Impact of physical activity and diet on lipoprotein particle concentrations in severely obese women participating in a 1-year lifestyle intervention

Authors

  • E. Aadland,

    Corresponding author
    1. Faculty of Health Studies, Sogn og Fjordane University College, Førde, Norway
    • Address for correspondence: Mr E Aadland, Faculty of Health Studies, Sogn og Fjordane University College, Box 523, 6803 Førde, Norway. E-mail: eivind.aadland@hisf.no

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  • J. R. Andersen,

    1. Faculty of Health Studies, Sogn og Fjordane University College, Førde, Norway
    2. Department of Surgery, Førde Central Hospital, Førde, Norway
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  • S. A. Anderssen,

    1. Department of Sports Medicine, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway
    2. Faculty of Teacher Education and Sports, Sogn og Fjordane University College, Sogndal, Norway
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  • O. M. Kvalheim

    1. Faculty of Health Studies, Sogn og Fjordane University College, Førde, Norway
    2. Department of Chemistry, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway
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Summary

What is already known about this subject

  • Physical activity and high aerobic fitness protects against cardiovascular disease and early death, besides having a very modest impact on lipoprotein-cholesterol in obese subjects.
  • Physical activity has been shown to favourably alter lipoprotein particle concentrations and apolipoprotein B with minimal weight loss in overweight to moderately obese subjects.

What this study adds

  • We studied the impact of physical activity on lipoprotein subclass particle concentrations in women with severe obesity.
  • Increased physical activity duration was associated with favourable changes, whereas increased PA intensity was associated with adverse changes in some lipoprotein particle subclasses in severely obese women.
  • Severely obese women that manage to increase their physical activity level can improve their lipoprotein profile, whether or not they lose fat mass

Physical activity (PA) and high aerobic fitness protects against cardiovascular disease and early death possibly among others because of an anti-atherogenic impact on lipoprotein particle concentrations. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of PA and diet on lipoprotein particle concentrations. Thirty-one severely obese women (age 43.6 ± 10.2 years; body mass index 43.0 ± 6.3 kg m−2) participated in a 1-year lifestyle intervention with repeated measurements of lipoprotein particle subclass concentrations and size of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL), as well as fat mass, PA and diet. Multiple regression was used to determine associations with change (Δ) in two principal components (PCs) describing lipoprotein distributions: ΔPC 1 LIPO (dominated by VLDL and LDL) and ΔPC 2 LIPO (dominated by large HDL and mean HDL particle size). ΔPA duration was the only variable that was significantly related to ΔPC 1 LIPO (partial r = −0.40, P = 0.008), while ΔPA intensity was the only variable that was significantly related to ΔPC 2 LIPO (partial r = −0.43, P = 0.003) in adjusted models. Increased PA duration was associated with favourable changes, whereas increased PA intensity was associated with adverse changes in some lipoprotein particle subclasses in severely obese women.

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