Accounting for Complementarity to Maximize Monitoring Power for Species Management

Authors

  • AYESHA I. T. TULLOCH,

    1. ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions, the NERP Environmental Decisions Hub, Centre for Biodiversity & Conservation Science, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • IADINE CHADÈS,

    1. CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences, Ecosciences Precinct, Queensland, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • HUGH P. POSSINGHAM

    1. ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions, the NERP Environmental Decisions Hub, Centre for Biodiversity & Conservation Science, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

To choose among conservation actions that may benefit many species, managers need to monitor the consequences of those actions. Decisions about which species to monitor from a suite of different species being managed are hindered by natural variability in populations and uncertainty in several factors: the ability of the monitoring to detect a change, the likelihood of the management action being successful for a species, and how representative species are of one another. However, the literature provides little guidance about how to account for these uncertainties when deciding which species to monitor to determine whether the management actions are delivering outcomes. We devised an approach that applies decision science and selects the best complementary suite of species to monitor to meet specific conservation objectives. We created an index for indicator selection that accounts for the likelihood of successfully detecting a real trend due to a management action and whether that signal provides information about other species. We illustrated the benefit of our approach by analyzing a monitoring program for invasive predator management aimed at recovering 14 native Australian mammals of conservation concern. Our method selected the species that provided more monitoring power at lower cost relative to the current strategy and traditional approaches that consider only a subset of the important considerations. Our benefit function accounted for natural variability in species growth rates, uncertainty in the responses of species to the prescribed action, and how well species represent others. Monitoring programs that ignore uncertainty, likelihood of detecting change, and complementarity between species will be more costly and less efficient and may waste funding that could otherwise be used for management.

Contabilización de la Complementariedad para Maximizar el Poder de Monitoreo para el Manejo de Especies

Resumen

Para seleccionar entre acciones de conservación que puedan beneficiar a muchas especies, los administradores necesitan monitorear las consecuencias de estas acciones. Las decisiones sobre que especies monitorear de un conjunto de diferentes especies que se están manejando son impedidas por la variabilidad natural en las poblaciones y la incertidumbre de ciertos factores: la habilidad del monitoreo para detectar un cambio, la probabilidad de que la acción de manejo sea benéfica para una especie, y que tan representativas son las especies una con la otra. Sin embargo la bibliografía proporciona poca dirección sobre cómo responder a estas incertidumbres cuando se decide que especies monitorear para determinar si las acciones de manejo entregan resultados. Diseñamos una aproximación que aplica la ciencia de las decisiones y selecciona el mejor juego complementario de especies para monitorear para cumplir con objetivos específicos de conservación. Creamos un índice para la selección de indicadores que responde a la probabilidad de detectar exitosamente una tendencia verdadera debido a la acción de manejo y si esa señal proporciona información sobre otra especie. Ilustramos el beneficio de nuestra aproximación al analizar un programa de monitoreo para el manejo de depredadores invasivos enfocado a la recuperación de 14 especies de mamíferos australianos nativos y de interés para la conservación. Nuestro método seleccionó a las especies que proporcionan mayor poder de monitoreo a costos relativamente bajos para la estrategia actual y a las aproximaciones que utilizan sólo una parte de las consideraciones importantes. Nuestra función de beneficio valió para la variabilidad natural en las tasas de crecimiento de especies, la incertidumbre en la respuesta de las especies a la acción prescrita y que tan bien las especies representan a otras. Programas de monitoreo que ignoran incertidumbres, la probabilidad de detectar cambios y la complementariedad entre especies serán más costosos y menos eficientes y pueden gastar recursos que podrían usarse para manejo.

Ancillary