Get access

Current Practice and Future Prospects for Social Data in Coastal and Ocean Planning

Authors

  • ELODIE LE CORNU,

    1. Center for Ocean Solutions, Stanford University, Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, Monterey, CA, U.S.A.
    2. Université Paul Valéry Montpellier III, Route de Mende, Montpellier, France
    Search for more papers by this author
  • JOHN N. KITTINGER,

    Corresponding author
    1. Center for Ocean Solutions, Stanford University, Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, Monterey, CA, U.S.A.
    2. Hawai'i Fish Trust, Betty and Gordon Moore Center for Science and Oceans, Conservation International, Honolulu, HI, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • J. ZACHARY KOEHN,

    1. Center for Ocean Solutions, Stanford University, Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, Monterey, CA, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • ELENA M. FINKBEINER,

    1. Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • LARRY B. CROWDER

    1. Center for Ocean Solutions, Stanford University, Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, Monterey, CA, U.S.A.
    2. Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Coastal and ocean planning comprises a broad field of practice. The goals, political processes, and approaches applied to planning initiatives may vary widely. However, all planning processes ultimately require adequate information on both the biophysical and social attributes of a planning region. In coastal and ocean planning practice, there are well-established methods to assess biophysical attributes; however, less is understood about the role and assessment of social data. We conducted the first global assessment of the incorporation of social data in coastal and ocean planning. We drew on a comprehensive review of planning initiatives and a survey of coastal and ocean practitioners. There was significantly more incorporation of social data in multiuse versus conservation-oriented planning. Practitioners engaged a wide range of social data, including governance, economic, and cultural attributes of planning regions and human impacts data. Less attention was given to ecosystem services and social–ecological linkages, both of which could improve coastal and ocean planning practice. Although practitioners recognize the value of social data, little funding is devoted to its collection and incorporation in plans. Increased capacity and sophistication in acquiring critical social and ecological data for planning is necessary to develop plans for more resilient coastal and ocean ecosystems and communities. We suggest that improving social data monitoring, and in particular spatial social data, to complement biophysical data, is necessary for providing holistic information for decision-support tools and other methods. Moving beyond people as impacts to people as beneficiaries, through ecosystem services assessments, holds much potential to better incorporate the tenets of ecosystem-based management into coastal and ocean planning by providing targets for linked biodiversity conservation and human welfare outcomes.

La Práctica Actual y los Prospectos Futuros para los Datos Sociales en la Planeación Costera y Oceánica

Resumen

La planeación costera oceánica incluye un campo amplio de práctica. Las metas, los procesos políticos y los acercamientos aplicados a la planeación de iniciativas pueden variar ampliamente. Sin embargo, todos los procesos de planeación requieren finalmente de información adecuada sobre los atributos sociales y biofísicos de una región de planeación. En la práctica de la planeación costera y oceánica existen métodos bien establecidos para evaluar los atributos biofísicos; sin embargo, el papel y la evaluación de los datos sociales son entendidos mucho menos. Llevamos a cabo la primera evaluación global de la incorporación de los datos sociales en la planeación costera y oceánica. Partimos de un resumen comprensivo de la planeación de iniciativas y un censo de practicantes costeros y oceánicos. Hubo una incorporación más significativa de datos sociales en el uso múltiple contra la planeación orientada por la conservación. Los practicantes ocuparon un rango extenso de datos sociales, incluidos los atributos de gobernación, económicos y culturales de las regiones de planeación y los datos de impacto humano. Se le prestó menos atención a los servicios ecosistémicos y a las conexiones socio-ecológicas, pudiendo ambas mejorar la práctica de planeación costera y oceánica. Aunque los practicantes reconocen el valor de los datos sociales, se le dedica poco financiamiento a su colección e incorporación en los planes. Un incremento en la capacidad y en la sofisticación para adquirir datos sociales y ecológicos críticos para la planeación es necesario para desarrollar planes para ecosistemas y comunidades costeras y oceánicas más resistentes. Sugerimos que mejorar el monitoreo de datos sociales, y en particular datos sociales espaciales, para complementar los datos biofísicos, es necesario para proporcionar información holística para las herramientas de apoyo a las decisiones y otros métodos. Ir más allá de las personas como impactos, y hacia las personas como beneficiarios, a través de la evaluación de servicios ecosistémicos, tiene mucho potencial para incorporar mejor los principios del manejo basado en ecosistemas a la planeación costera y oceánica al proporcionar objetivos para la conservación de la biodiversidad y los resultados de bienestar humano que estén conectados.

Ancillary