Identification of the internal anal opening and seton placement improves the outcome of deep postanal space abscess

Authors

  • K.-K. Tan,

    1. Division of Colorectal Surgery, University Surgical Cluster, National University Health System, Singapore City, Singapore
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  • X. Liu,

    1. Division of Colorectal Surgery, University Surgical Cluster, National University Health System, Singapore City, Singapore
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  • C. B. Tsang,

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Colorectal Surgery, University Surgical Cluster, National University Health System, Singapore City, Singapore
    • Correspondence to: Charles B. Tsang, Division of Colorectal Surgery, University Surgical Cluster, National University Health System, 1E Kent Ridge Road, Singapore City 119228, Singapore.

      E-mail: drcharlestsang@colorectalclinic.com

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  • D. C. Koh

    1. Division of Colorectal Surgery, University Surgical Cluster, National University Health System, Singapore City, Singapore
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  • This article was presented as a podium presentation in the Tripartite Colorectal Meeting in Cairns, Queensland, Australia, 3–7 July 2011, and as a poster in the ASCRS Annual Meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, 14–18 May 2011.

Abstract

Aim

This study aimed to determine if successful seton placement at the initial drainage procedure improves outcomes in the management of deep postanal space abscesses.

Method

A retrospective review was performed of all patients who underwent initial drainage of a DPA space abscess between December 2002 and August 2010. A seton was placed through the internal opening if it could be identified.

Results

Thirty-two patients of median age 41 (21–64) years formed the study group. Twenty-four (75.0%) had a seton inserted at the initial drainage procedure. The patients underwent a total of 56 operations. The median interval from the initial to the final operation was 5 (2–18) months with 17 (70.8%) patients having the final operation within 6 months. In the 8 (25.0%) patients whose internal opening could not be found, 26 operations were required with a median interval from the initial to the final surgery of 11 (3–24) months. Patients who had a seton successfully inserted at drainage underwent significantly earlier definitive surgery and required fewer operations (< 0.038).

Conclusion

Identification of an internal opening with placement of a seton at the initial drainage procedure is associated with earlier definitive surgery and fewer operations.

Ancillary