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SCHOOL CHOICE: SUPPORTERS AND OPPONENTS

Authors

  • DAVID M. BRASINGTON,

    1. Brasington: Department of Economics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45227-0371. Phone 513-556-2616, Fax 513-556-2669, E-mail david.brasington@ uc.edu
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  • DIANE HITE

    1. Hite: Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849. Phone 338-844-5655, Fax 334-844-5639, E-mail hitedia@auburn.edu
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    • The authors thank Srinivas Thouta and Steve Procopio for administering the survey. Brasington is grateful for a $10,000 grant from the Louisiana State University Council on Research. Thank you to Larry Kenny, Eric Brunner, Lena Birkelof, Katrin Anacker, Joe Molnar, Conner Bailey, and presentation attendees at Tulane University, Western Regional Science Association, University of Cincinnati, and Auburn University, for helpful comments and suggestions.


Abstract

We examine the attitudes of Ohio homeowners about school choice, which includes open enrollment programs, school vouchers, tuition tax credits, and charter schools. Previous studies examine more limited forms of choice and investigate fewer possible influences. Overall we report at least five new findings and five findings that contradict previous studies. We find the strongest predictors of opposition for school choice are people having graduate degrees and living in high-performing public school districts. We find people living in blue collar areas and using private schools to be the strongest predictors of support. Males tend to oppose choice and African Americans support it. We find no role for income, the convenience of alternative schools, or the protection of house values in support for school choice. Overall we report at least five new findings and five findings that contradict previous studies. (JEL H44, I22)

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