Get access

The perceived risks and benefits of quitting in smokers diagnosed with severe mental illness participating in a smoking cessation intervention: Gender differences and comparison to smokers without mental illness

Authors

  • Sacha L. Filia,

    Corresponding author
    1. Monash Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, Central Clinical School, The Alfred Hospital, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
    • Correspondence to Ms Sacha Filia, Monash Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, Central Clinical School, Monash University, The Alfred Hospital, Level 4, 607 Street Kilda Road, Melbourne, Vic. 3004, Australia. Tel: +61 3 9076 6564; Fax: +61 3 9076 6588; E-mail: sacha.filia@monash.edu

    Search for more papers by this author
  • Amanda L. Baker,

    1. Priority Research Centre for Translational Neuroscience and Mental Health, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Caroline T. Gurvich,

    1. Monash Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, Central Clinical School, The Alfred Hospital, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Robyn Richmond,

    1. School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jayashri Kulkarni

    1. Monash Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, Central Clinical School, The Alfred Hospital, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author

  • Ms Sacha L. Filia BSc(Hons), PhD Candidate, Research Fellow, Professsor Amanda L. Baker BA(Hons), MPsych, PhD, Professor, Dr Caroline T. Gurvich BA/BSc(Hons), DPsych(ClinNeuro), Clinical Neuropsychologist, Research Fellow, Professor Robyn Richmond BA, MA, PhD, MHEd, Professor, Professor Jayashri Kulkarni MBBS, MPM, FRANZCP, PhD, Professor, Director.

Abstract

Introduction and Aims

This study aimed to examine the perceived risks and benefits of quitting in smokers diagnosed with psychosis, including potential gender differences and comparisons to smokers in the general population.

Design and Methods

Data were collected from 200 people diagnosed with psychosis participating in a randomised controlled trial testing the effectiveness of a multi-component intervention for smoking cessation and cardiovascular disease risk reduction in people with severe mental illness. Results were compared with both treatment and non-treatment seeking smokers in the general population.

Results

Male and female smokers with psychosis generally had similar perceived risks and benefits of quitting. Females rated it significantly more likely that they would experience weight gain and negative affect upon quitting than males diagnosed with psychosis. Compared with smokers in the general population also seeking smoking cessation treatment, this sample of smokers with psychosis demonstrated fewer gender differences and lower ratings of perceived risks and benefits of quitting. The pattern of risk and benefit ratings in smokers diagnosed with psychosis was similar to those of non-treatment seeking smokers in the general population.

Discussion and Conclusions

These results increase our understanding of smoking in people with severe mental illness, and can directly inform smoking interventions to maximise successful abstinence for this group of smokers. For female smokers with psychosis, smoking cessation interventions need to address concerns regarding weight gain and negative affect. Intervention strategies aimed at enhancing beliefs about the benefits of quitting smoking for both male and female smokers with psychosis are necessary. [Filia S L, Baker A L, Gurvich C T, Richmond R, Kulkarni J. The perceived risks and benefits of quitting in smokers diagnosed with severe mental illness participating in a smoking cessation intervention: Gender differences and comparison to smokers without mental illness. Drug Alcohol Rev 2014;33:78–85]

Ancillary