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ddi12034-sup-0001-FigsS1-S5-TablesS1-S3.docWord document4967K

Figure S1 Frequency distribution of the size of 619 protected areas in the New World (a) and log-transformed size (b).

Figure S2 Relationship between total reported species richness and range-map-based richness for (a) amphibians, (b) birds and (c) mammals in protected areas of the New World. The values of the Pearson's product-moment correlation (r) are given, as well equations and coefficients of determination (R2) of the standardised major axis linear regressions.

Figure S3 Map of amphibian species richness in protected areas of the Western hemisphere, obtained from species checklists and from range maps.

Figure S4 Map of bird species richness in protected areas of the Western hemisphere, obtained from species checklists and from range maps.

Figure S5 Map of mammal species richness in protected areas of the Western hemisphere, obtained from species checklists and from range maps.

Table S1 Number of protected areas with data on species richness obtained from different sources (See Tables S2 and S3 for more information).

Table S2 Sources that were searched to obtain data on numbers and inventories of terrestrial vertebrates (e.g., from management plans, technical reports and other literature) in protected areas of the New World.

Table S3 Sources that were searched by country in addition to the ones in Table S2 (plus links) to obtain data on numbers and inventories of terrestrial vertebrates (e.g., from management plans, technical reports and other literature).

ddi12034-sup-0002-TableS4.docWord document1118KTable S4 Amphibian, bird and mammal richness in protected areas of the Western hemisphere.
ddi12034-sup-0003-TablesS5-S10.docWord document856K

Table S5 Representation of 3096 extant, native amphibian species of the Western hemisphere in 324 protected areas.

Table S6 Representation of 4100 extant, native bird species in 455 protected areas of the Western hemisphere.

Table S7 Representation of 1878 native, extant mammal species in 379 protected areas of the Western hemisphere.

Tables S8 Reserves included in a final network of priority protected areas in the Western hemisphere for amphibians, in the order in which they were selected by a richness-based algorithm (i.e. the site with the highest number of species that are not currently in the reserve is selected at each step) using species richness and presence in protected areas based on checklists and on range maps.

Table S9 Reserves included in a final network of priority protected areas for birds in the Western hemisphere, in the order in which they were selected by a richness-based algorithm (i.e. the site with the highest number of species that are not currently in the reserve is selected at each step) using species richness and presence in protected areas based on checklists and on range maps.

Table S10 Reserves included in a final network of priority protected areas for mammals in the Western hemisphere, in the order in which they were selected by a richness-based algorithm (i.e. the site with the highest number of species that are not currently in the reserve is selected at each step) using species richness and presence in protected areas based on checklists and on range maps.

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