Developmental Science

Cover image for Vol. 16 Issue 1

January 2013

Volume 16, Issue 1

Pages i–ii, 1–148

  1. ISSUE INFORMATION

    1. Top of page
    2. ISSUE INFORMATION
    3. EDITORIAL
    4. PAPERS
    5. SHORT REPORTS
    6. PAPERS
    1. You have free access to this content
      Issue Information (pages i–ii)

      Article first published online: 21 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/desc.12000

  2. EDITORIAL

    1. Top of page
    2. ISSUE INFORMATION
    3. EDITORIAL
    4. PAPERS
    5. SHORT REPORTS
    6. PAPERS
  3. PAPERS

    1. Top of page
    2. ISSUE INFORMATION
    3. EDITORIAL
    4. PAPERS
    5. SHORT REPORTS
    6. PAPERS
    1. The development of creative cognition across adolescence: distinct trajectories for insight and divergent thinking (pages 2–12)

      Sietske W. Kleibeuker, Carsten K.W. De Dreu and Eveline A. Crone

      Article first published online: 8 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-7687.2012.01176.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We examined developmental trajectories of creative cognition across adolescence. Participants (N = 98), divided into four age groups (12/13 yrs, 15/16 yrs, 18/19 yrs, and 25–30 yrs), were subjected to a battery of tasks gauging creative insight (visual;verbal) and divergent thinking (verbal; visuo-spatial). The two older age groups outperformed the two younger age groups on insight tasks.

    2. The COMT Val/Met polymorphism is associated with reading-related skills and consistent patterns of functional neural activation (pages 13–23)

      Nicole Landi, Stephen J. Frost, W. Einar Mencl, Jonathan L. Preston, Leslie K. Jacobsen, Maria Lee, Carolyn Yrigollen, Kenneth R. Pugh and Elena L. Grigorenko

      Article first published online: 3 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-7687.2012.01180.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In both children and adults there is large variability in reading skill, with approximately 5–10% of individuals characterized as having reading disability; these individuals struggle to learn to read despite adequate intelligence and opportunity. Although it is well established that a substantial portion of this variability is attributed to the genetic differences between individuals, specifics of the connections between reading and the genome are not understood. This article presents data that suggest that variation in the COMT gene, which has previously been associated with variation in higher-order cognition, is associated with reading and reading-related skills, at the level of both brain and behavior.

    3. (Non)words, (non)words, (non)words: evidence for a protolexicon during the first year of life (pages 24–34)

      Céline Ngon, Andrew Martin, Emmanuel Dupoux, Dominique Cabrol, Michel Dutat and Sharon Peperkamp

      Article first published online: 21 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-7687.2012.01189.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Previous research with artificial language learning paradigms has shown that infants are sensitive to statistical cues to word boundaries (Saffran, Aslin & Newport, 1996) and that they can use these cues to extract word-like units (Saffran, 2001). However, it is unknown whether infants use statistical information to construct a receptive lexicon when acquiring their native language. We show that at 11 months, French-learning infants recognize highly frequent sound sequences from their native language and fail to differentiate between words and nonwords among these sequences. These results are evidence that they have used statistical information to extract word candidates from their input and stored them in a “protolexicon”, containing both words and nonwords.

    4. Do subitizing deficits in developmental dyscalculia involve pattern recognition weakness? (pages 35–46)

      Sarit Ashkenazi, Nitza Mark-Zigdon and Avishai Henik

      Article first published online: 18 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-7687.2012.01190.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The abilities of children diagnosed with developmental dyscalculia (DD) were examined in two types of object enumeration: subitizing, and small estimation (5–9 dots). Subitizing is usually defined as a fast and accurate assessment of a number of small dots (range 1 to 4 dots), and estimation is an imprecise process to assess a large number of items (range 5 dots or more). Based on reaction time (RT) and accuracy analysis, our results indicated a deficit in the subitizing and small estimation range among DD participants in relation to controls. Dots were presented in canonical or random arrangement. DD participants presented a deficit in the estimation of canonically arranged dots. The present finding indicates that pattern recognition difficulties may play a significant role in subitizing deficits among those with DD.

    5. Minimal-group membership influences children's responses to novel experience with group members (pages 47–55)

      Mariah G. Schug, Anna Shusterman, Hilary Barth and Andrea L. Patalano

      Article first published online: 26 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-7687.2012.01193.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Children, like adults, tend to prefer ingroup over outgroup individuals, but how this group bias affects children's processing of information about social groups is not well understood. In this study, 5- and 6-year-old children were assigned to artificial groups. They observed instances of ingroup and outgroup members behaving in either a positive (egalitarian) or a negative (stingy) manner.

    6. Deficits in volitional oculomotor control align with language status in autism spectrum disorders (pages 56–66)

      David J. Kelly, Robin Walker and Courtenay Frazier Norbury

      Article first published online: 10 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-7687.2012.01188.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Eye-tracking paradigms are increasingly used to investigate higher-level social and cognitive processing in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, the integrity of the oculomotor system within ASD is unclear, with contradictory reports of aberrant eye-movements on basic oculomotor tasks. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether reducing population heterogeneity and distinguishing neurocognitive phenotypes can clarify discrepancies in oculomotor behaviour evident in previous reports.

    7. Later language development in narratives in children with perinatal stroke (pages 67–83)

      Judy S. Reilly, Sophie Wasserman and Mark Appelbaum

      Article first published online: 8 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-7687.2012.01192.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Studies of young children with unilateral perinatal stroke (PS) have confirmed the plasticity of the developing brain for acquiring language. While recent studies of typically developing children have demonstrated the significant development of language well into adolescence, we know little regarding the course of language development in the PS group as they mature. Will children with PS continue to show the same remarkable plasticity that they exhibited at younger ages? In the present paper we investigate later language and discourse in children with perinatal stroke (ages 7–16) using spoken personal narrative as the discourse context.

    8. Fearlessness in juvenile offenders is associated with offending rate (pages 84–90)

      Eva M. Syngelaki, Graeme Fairchild, Simon C. Moore, Justin C. Savage and Stephanie H.M. van Goozen

      Article first published online: 10 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-7687.2012.01191.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Poor fear conditioning is a correlate of violent offending in adults, but there is no evidence concerning juvenile offenders. Our aim was to compare emotional learning in juvenile offenders and controls and establish whether crime rate is related to seriousness of emotional learning problems. To this end, emotional learning was assessed in 42 juvenile offenders by measuring skin conductance responding (SCR) during fear conditioning.

    9. Getting the closer object? An information-based dissociation between vision for perception and vision for movement in early infancy (pages 91–100)

      Margot van Wermeskerken, John van der Kamp, Geert J.P. Savelsbergh and Claes von Hofsten

      Article first published online: 27 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/desc.12006

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In human adults two functionally and neuro-anatomically separate systems exist for the use of visual information in perception and the use of visual information to control movements (Milner & Goodale, ,). We investigated whether this separation is already functioning in the early stages of the development of reaching. To this end we investigated 6- and 7-month-old infants' preferential reaching and control of reaching for identical objects at identical physical distances in front of an illusory Ponzo-like background that made them appear to be located at different distances.

    10. Speech-evoked auditory brainstem responses reflect familial and cognitive influences (pages 101–110)

      Jane Hornickel, Deborah Lin and Nina Kraus

      Article first published online: 21 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/desc.12009

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The auditory brainstem response (ABR) to speech is linked to language skill; however, the impact of familiality had not been assessed. We collected ABRs to speech from children who were siblings, matched on reading ability, or matched only on age and sex. Response similarity (intersubject response-to-response correlations) was strongest for siblings, slightly weaker for children matched on reading ability, and weakest for children matched on age and sex only. These results suggest that auditory brainstem function can be influenced by siblingship and language skills, motivating the use of speech-evoked ABRs for assessing risk of communication impairments in families.

    11. Language is not necessary for color categories (pages 111–115)

      Ozge Ozturk, Shakila Shayan, Ulf Liszkowski and Asifa Majid

      Article first published online: 21 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/desc.12008

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The origin of color categories is under debate. Some researchers argue that color categories are linguistically constructed, while others claim they have a pre-linguistic, and possibly even innate, basis. Although there is some evidence that 4-6 month old infants respond categorically to color, these empirical results have been challenged in recent years.

      Corrected by:

      Erratum: Erratum

      Vol. 17, Issue 4, 644, Article first published online: 22 JUN 2014

  4. SHORT REPORTS

    1. Top of page
    2. ISSUE INFORMATION
    3. EDITORIAL
    4. PAPERS
    5. SHORT REPORTS
    6. PAPERS
    1. Atypical updating of face representations with experience in children with autism (pages 116–123)

      Louise Ewing, Elizabeth Pellicano and Gillian Rhodes

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/desc.12007

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Face identity aftereffects are significantly diminished in children with autism relative to typical children, which may reflect reduced perceptual updating with experience. Here, we investigated whether this atypicality also extends to non-face stimulus categories, which might signal a pervasive visual processing difference in individuals with autism. We used a figural aftereffect task to measure directly perceptual updating following exposure to distorted upright faces, inverted faces and cars, in typical children and children with autism.

  5. PAPERS

    1. Top of page
    2. ISSUE INFORMATION
    3. EDITORIAL
    4. PAPERS
    5. SHORT REPORTS
    6. PAPERS
    1. Environmental contributions to preschoolers' semantic fluency (pages 124–135)

      Gitit Kavé, Moran Shalmon and Ariel Knafo

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/desc.12010

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Semantic fluency was examined in Hebrew speaking 5-year-old monozygotic and dizygotic twins (N = 396, 198 pairs), 22% of them with mother-reported speech-related problems. There were positive correlations of similar magnitudes among monozygotic, same-sex dizygotic, and opposite-sex dizygotic twins. Analyses showed no genetic effects, alongside significant shared (39%) and non-shared environmental (61%) effects on fluency scores.

    2. ANS acuity and mathematics ability in preschoolers from low-income homes: contributions of inhibitory control (pages 136–148)

      Mary Wagner Fuhs and Nicole M. McNeil

      Article first published online: 20 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/desc.12013

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Recent findings by Libertus et al. (2011) suggest that there is an association between the acuity of young children's approximate number system (ANS) and their mathematics ability before exposure to instruction in formal schooling. The present study examined the generalizability and validity of these findings in a sample of preschoolers from low-income homes. Children attending Head Start (= 103) completed measures to assess ANS acuity, mathematics ability, receptive vocabulary, and inhibitory control.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION