Developmental Science

Cover image for Vol. 16 Issue 2

March 2013

Volume 16, Issue 2

Pages i–ii, 149–325

  1. ISSUE INFORMATION

    1. Top of page
    2. ISSUE INFORMATION
    3. PAPERS
    4. SHORT REPORTS
    5. PAPERS
    6. COMMENTARY
    7. ERRATUM
    1. You have free access to this content
      Issue Information (pages i–ii)

      Version of Record online: 23 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/desc.12001

  2. PAPERS

    1. Top of page
    2. ISSUE INFORMATION
    3. PAPERS
    4. SHORT REPORTS
    5. PAPERS
    6. COMMENTARY
    7. ERRATUM
    1. Probabilistic cue combination: less is more (pages 149–158)

      Daniel Yurovsky, Ty W. Boyer, Linda B. Smith and Chen Yu

      Version of Record online: 18 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/desc.12011

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      Learning about the structure of the world requires learning probabilistic relationships: rules in which cues do not predict outcomes with certainty. However, in some cases, the ability to track probabilistic relationships is a handicap, leading adults to perform non-normatively in prediction tasks. For example, in the dilution effect, predictions made from the combination of two cues of different strengths are less accurate than those made from the stronger cue alone. We show that dilution is an adult problem; 11-month-old infants combine strong and weak predictors normatively.

    2. Developmental trends in auditory processing can provide early predictions of language acquisition in young infants (pages 159–172)

      Weerasak Chonchaiya, Twila Tardif, Xiaoqin Mai, Lin Xu, Mingyan Li, Niko Kaciroti, Paul R. Kileny, Jie Shao and Betsy Lozoff

      Version of Record online: 20 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/desc.12012

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      Auditory processing capabilities at the subcortical level have been hypothesized to impact an individual's development of both language and reading abilities. The present study examined whether auditory processing capabilities relate to language development in healthy 9-month-old infants. Participants were 71 infants (31 boys and 40 girls) with both Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) and language assessments.

    3. Infants' mu suppression during the observation of real and mimicked goal-directed actions (pages 173–185)

      Petra Warreyn, Lieselot Ruysschaert, Jan R. Wiersema, Andrea Handl, Griet Pattyn and Herbert Roeyers

      Version of Record online: 20 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/desc.12014

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      Since their discovery in the early 90's, mirror neurons have been proposed to be related to many social-communicative abilities, such as imitation. However, research into the early manifestations of the putative neural mirroring system and its role in early social development is still inconclusive. In the current EEG study, mu suppression, generally thought to reflect activity in neural mirroring systems was investigated in 18- to 30-month olds during the observation of object manipulations as well as mimicked actions.

    4. Frontolimbic neural circuitry at 6 months predicts individual differences in joint attention at 9 months (pages 186–197)

      Jed T. Elison, Jason J. Wolff, Debra C. Heimer, Sarah J. Paterson, Hongbin Gu, Heather C. Hazlett, Martin Styner, Guido Gerig, Joseph Piven and for the IBIS Network

      Version of Record online: 20 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/desc.12015

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      Elucidating the neural basis of joint attention in infancy promises to yield important insights into the development of language and social cognition, and directly informs developmental models of autism. We describe a new method for evaluating responding to joint attention performance in infancy that highlights the 9 to 10 month period as a time interval of maximal individual differences. We then demonstrate that fractional anisotropy in the right uncinate fasciculus, a white matter fiber bundle connecting the amygdala to the ventral-medial prefrontal cortex and anterior temporal pole, measured in 6 month-olds predicts individual differences in responding to joint attention at 9 months of age.

  3. SHORT REPORTS

    1. Top of page
    2. ISSUE INFORMATION
    3. PAPERS
    4. SHORT REPORTS
    5. PAPERS
    6. COMMENTARY
    7. ERRATUM
    1. East–West cultural differences in context-sensitivity are evident in early childhood (pages 198–208)

      Toshie Imada, Stephanie M. Carlson and Shoji Itakura

      Version of Record online: 20 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/desc.12016

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      Accumulating evidence suggests that North Americans tend to focus on central objects whereas East Asians tend to pay more attention to contextual information in a visual scene. The present study examined children in the United States and Japan to investigate the developmental pattern in context-sensitivity and its relation to executive function. The study found that context-sensitivity increased with age across cultures. Nevertheless, Japanese children showed significantly greater context-sensitivity than American children. Also, context-sensitivity fully mediated the cultural difference in a set-shifting executive function task, which might help explain past findings that East Asian children outperformed their American counterparts on executive function.

  4. PAPERS

    1. Top of page
    2. ISSUE INFORMATION
    3. PAPERS
    4. SHORT REPORTS
    5. PAPERS
    6. COMMENTARY
    7. ERRATUM
    1. The mentalistic basis of core social cognition: experiments in preverbal infants and a computational model (pages 209–226)

      J. Kiley Hamlin, Tomer Ullman, Josh Tenenbaum, Noah Goodman and Chris Baker

      Version of Record online: 23 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/desc.12017

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      Evaluating individuals based on their pro- and anti-social behaviors is fundamental to successful human interaction. Recent research suggests that even preverbal infants engage in social evaluation; however, it remains an open question whether infants’ judgments are driven uniquely by an analysis of the mental states that motivate others’ helpful and unhelpful actions, or whether non-mentalistic inferences are at play. Here we present evidence from 10-month-olds, motivated and supported by a Bayesian computational model, for mentalistic social evaluation in the first year of life.

    2. Perception of the motion trajectory of objects from moving cast shadows in infant Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) (pages 227–233)

      Tomoko Imura, Ikuma Adachi, Yuko Hattori and Masaki Tomonaga

      Version of Record online: 23 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/desc.12020

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      The shadows cast by moving objects enable human adults and infants to infer the motion trajectories of objects. Nonhuman animals must also be able to discriminate between objects and their shadows and infer the spatial layout of objects from cast shadows. However, the evolutionary and comparative developmental origins of sensitivity to cast shadows have not been investigated.

    3. SES differences in language processing skill and vocabulary are evident at 18 months (pages 234–248)

      Anne Fernald, Virginia A. Marchman and Adriana Weisleder

      Version of Record online: 8 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/desc.12019

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      This longitudinal study examined developmental changes in language proficiency in a diverse group of English-learning infants from higher- and lower-SES families. Significant SES differences in both vocabulary and real-time language processing efficiency were already evident at age 18 months. By 24 months of age there was a 6-month gap between SES groups in processing skills critical to language development. Such a large disparity cannot simply be dismissed as a transitory delay, given that differences in trajectories of language growth established by 3 years of age tend to persist and are predictive of later school success or failure.

    4. Bidirectional influences between maternal parenting and children's peer problems: a longitudinal monozygotic twin difference study (pages 249–259)

      Shinji Yamagata, Yusuke Takahashi, Koken Ozaki, Keiko K. Fujisawa, Koichi Nonaka and Juko Ando

      Version of Record online: 20 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/desc.12021

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      This longitudinal twin study examined the bidirectional relationship between maternal parenting behaviors and children's peer problems that were not confounded by genetics and family environment. Mothers of 259 monozygotic twin pairs reported parenting behaviors and peer problems when twins were 42 and 48 months. Path analyses on monozygotic twin differences scores revealed that authoritative parenting (the presence of consistent discipline and lack of harsh parenting) and peer problems simultaneously influenced each other.

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Generalist genes and cognitive abilities in Chinese twins (pages 260–268)

      Bonnie Wing-Yin Chow, Connie Suk-Han Ho, Simpson Wai-Lap Wong, Mary M.Y. Waye and Dorothy V.M. Bishop

      Version of Record online: 7 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/desc.12022

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      This study considered how far nonverbal cognitive, language and reading abilities are affected by common genetic influences in a sample of 312 typically developing Chinese twin pairs aged from 3 to 11 years. Children were individually given tasks of Chinese word reading, receptive vocabulary, phonological memory, tone awareness, syllable and rhyme awareness, rapid automatized naming, morphological awareness and orthographic skills, and Raven's Colored Progressive Matrices.

    6. Speed isn't everything: complex processing speed measures mask individual differences and developmental changes in executive control (pages 269–286)

      Nicholas J. Cepeda, Katharine A. Blackwell and Yuko Munakata

      Version of Record online: 23 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/desc.12024

      The rate at which people process information appears to influence many aspects of cognition across the lifespan. However, many commonly accepted measures of “processing speed” may require goal maintenance, manipulation of information in working memory, and decision-making, blurring the distinction between processing speed and executive control and resulting in overestimation of processing-speed contributions to cognition. This concern may apply particularly to studies of developmental change, as even seemingly simple processing speed measures may require executive processes to keep children and older adults on task.

    7. Auditory habituation in the fetus and neonate: an fMEG study (pages 287–295)

      Jana Muenssinger, Tamara Matuz, Franziska Schleger, Isabelle Kiefer-Schmidt, Rangmar Goelz, Annette Wacker-Gussmann, Niels Birbaumer and Hubert Preissl

      Version of Record online: 23 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/desc.12025

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      Habituation - the most basic form of learning - is used to evaluate central nervous system (CNS) maturation and to detect abnormalities in fetal brain-development. In the current study, habituation, stimulus specificity and dishabituation of auditory evoked responses were measured in fetuses and newborns using fetal magnetoencephalography (fMEG). An auditory habituation paradigm consisting of 100 trains of five 500Hz tones, one 750Hz tone (dishabituator) and two more 500Hz tones respectively were presented to 41 fetuses (gestational age 30-39 weeks) and 22 newborns/babies (age 6-89 days).

    8. Target Article with Commentaries: Developmental niche construction (pages 296–313)

      Emma G. Flynn, Kevin N. Laland, Rachel L. Kendal and Jeremy R. Kendal

      Version of Record online: 23 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/desc.12030

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      Niche construction is the modification of components of the environment through an organism's activities. Humans modify their environments mainly through ontogenetic and cultural processes. It is this reliance on learning, plasticity and culture that lends human niche construction a special potency as the constructed niche is ecologically inherited between generations t and t+1. In this paper we aim to facilitate discussion between researchers interested in niche construction and those interested in human development by highlighting some of the related processes.

  5. COMMENTARY

    1. Top of page
    2. ISSUE INFORMATION
    3. PAPERS
    4. SHORT REPORTS
    5. PAPERS
    6. COMMENTARY
    7. ERRATUM
    1. On hermit crabs and humans (pages 314–316)

      Michael S.C. Thomas

      Version of Record online: 3 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/desc.12031

  6. ERRATUM

    1. Top of page
    2. ISSUE INFORMATION
    3. PAPERS
    4. SHORT REPORTS
    5. PAPERS
    6. COMMENTARY
    7. ERRATUM
    1. You have free access to this content
      Erratum (page 324)

      Version of Record online: 23 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/desc.12060

      This article corrects:

      Information from multiple modalities helps 5-month-olds learn abstract rules

      Vol. 12, Issue 4, 504–509, Version of Record online: 10 FEB 2009

    2. You have free access to this content
      Erratum (page 325)

      Version of Record online: 23 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/desc.12061

      This article corrects:

      What’s mine is mine: twelve-month-olds use possessive pronouns to identify referents

      Vol. 14, Issue 4, 859–864, Version of Record online: 24 MAR 2011

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