Diabetic Medicine

Cover image for Vol. 30 Issue 10

October 2013

Volume 30, Issue 10

Pages 1147–1266

  1. Editor's Selection: This Month's Highlighted Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Selection: This Month's Highlighted Articles
    3. Review Article
    4. Commentary
    5. Systematic Review
    6. Review Article
    7. Research Articles
    8. Letters
    9. Erratum
    1. GLP-1-based diabetes therapies; trial by media (page 1147)

      G. A. Hitman, R. D. Leslie and R. I. G. Holt

      Version of Record online: 16 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/dme.12299

  2. Review Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Selection: This Month's Highlighted Articles
    3. Review Article
    4. Commentary
    5. Systematic Review
    6. Review Article
    7. Research Articles
    8. Letters
    9. Erratum
  3. Commentary

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Selection: This Month's Highlighted Articles
    3. Review Article
    4. Commentary
    5. Systematic Review
    6. Review Article
    7. Research Articles
    8. Letters
    9. Erratum
  4. Systematic Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Selection: This Month's Highlighted Articles
    3. Review Article
    4. Commentary
    5. Systematic Review
    6. Review Article
    7. Research Articles
    8. Letters
    9. Erratum
    1. Sulphonylureas and risk of cardiovascular disease: systematic review and meta-analysis (pages 1160–1171)

      O. J. Phung, E. Schwartzman, R. W. Allen, S. S. Engel and S. N. Rajpathak

      Version of Record online: 16 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/dme.12232

  5. Review Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Selection: This Month's Highlighted Articles
    3. Review Article
    4. Commentary
    5. Systematic Review
    6. Review Article
    7. Research Articles
    8. Letters
    9. Erratum
    1. Biological variation of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with diabetes (pages 1172–1180)

      A. J. Dawson, T. Sathyapalan, S. L. Atkin and E. S. Kilpatrick

      Version of Record online: 16 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/dme.12160

  6. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Selection: This Month's Highlighted Articles
    3. Review Article
    4. Commentary
    5. Systematic Review
    6. Review Article
    7. Research Articles
    8. Letters
    9. Erratum
    1. Epidemiology

      Diminishing differences in treatment between patients with colorectal cancer with and without diabetes: a population-based study (pages 1181–1188)

      M. M. J. Zanders, L. N. van Steenbergen, H. R. Haak, H. J. T. Rutten, J. F. M. Pruijt, P. M. P. Poortmans, V. E. P. P. Lemmens and L. V. van de Poll-Franse

      Version of Record online: 28 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/dme.12253

      What's new?

      • Because of the increasing and high prevalence of diabetes and cancer, an increasing number of oncologists will be confronted with individuals suffering from both diseases. This study used data from the population-based Eindhoven Cancer Registry that has unique data on cancer treatment. Consequently, previous studies using this registry are highly cited.
      • Our study revealed that the administration of chemotherapy and radiotherapy increased between 1995 and 2010 in patients with colorectal cancer with and without diabetes. However, patients with colorectal cancer with diabetes continue to receive chemotherapy less frequently than those without diabetes.
    2. In-treatment HDL cholesterol levels and development of new diabetes mellitus in hypertensive patients: The LIFE Study (pages 1189–1197)

      P. M. Okin, D. A. Hille, B. P. Wiik, S. E. Kjeldsen, L. H. Lindholm, B. Dahlöf and R. B. Devereux

      Version of Record online: 24 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/dme.12213

    3. Pre-diabetes in adults 45 years and over in Ireland: the Survey of Lifestyle, Attitudes and Nutrition in Ireland 2007 (pages 1198–1203)

      C. M. Buckley, J. Madden, K. Balanda, S. Barron, L. Fahy, J. Harrington, I. J. Perry and P. M. Kearney

      Version of Record online: 12 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/dme.12226

    4. Treatment

      A randomized, double-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled trial of 6 weeks benfotiamine treatment on postprandial vascular function and variables of autonomic nerve function in Type 2 diabetes (pages 1204–1208)

      A. Stirban, A. Pop and D. Tschoepe

      Version of Record online: 12 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/dme.12240

      What's new?

      • This study investigates the effects of 6 weeks of benfotiamine therapy on postprandial vascular function.
      • The magnitude of the postprandial response is dependent on the baseline vascular function: when fasting vascular function is already markedly impaired, no further significant postprandial deterioration is possible and therefore effects of potential beneficial interventions are not obvious. This might have implications for further study designs.
      • In people with diabetes and marked impairment of vascular function, either long-term therapies are necessary to restore vascular function, or there is a point of no return. Both hypotheses deserve further investigation.
    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Trends in selection and timing of first-line pharmacotherapy in older patients with Type 2 diabetes diagnosed between 1994 and 2006 (pages 1209–1213)

      P. D. Foster, M. M. Mamdani, D. N. Juurlink, B. R. Shah, J. M. Paterson and T. Gomes

      Version of Record online: 24 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/dme.12214

      What's new?

      • Evidence-based guidelines for Type 2 diabetes management have changed worldwide to prompt urgent and aggressive treatment.
      • However, there is a dearth of data describing changes in actual management practices.
      • Our investigation describes changing preferences in first-line oral anti-hyperglycaemic agents and reveals a surprising increase in time from diagnosis to pharmacologic treatment.
      • We expect that further investigation of this time lag in treatment will uncover means by which to improve Type 2 diabetes management in older populations.
    6. Pathophysiology

      Thirty days of resveratrol supplementation does not affect postprandial incretin hormone responses, but suppresses postprandial glucagon in obese subjects (pages 1214–1218)

      F. K. Knop, E. Konings, S. Timmers, P. Schrauwen, J. J. Holst and E. E. Blaak

      Version of Record online: 7 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/dme.12231

      What's new?

      • Supplementation with resveratrol, a natural polyphenolic compound found in red wine, for 30 days does not increase gut incretin hormones in obese otherwise healthy subjects.
      • Resveratrol supplementation suppresses postprandial glucagon responses, which may represent a novel protective mechanism against the development of disturbed glucose tolerance and Type 2 diabetes.
    7. Differences in post-mortem findings after stillbirth in women with and without diabetes (pages 1219–1224)

      A. Edwards, A. Springett, J. Padfield, J. Dorling, G. Bugg and P. Mansell

      Version of Record online: 24 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/dme.12272

      What's new?

      • This is the first study of post-mortem findings after stillbirth in women with maternal diabetes compared with matched control subjects.
      • The results of the study indicate that approximately one half of stillbirths in women with diabetes may be attributable to a subacute metabolic disturbance, often occurring in association with a small placenta.
      • The findings are of potential interest in understanding the cause of the increased incidence of stillbirth in women with diabetes.
    8. Genetics

      Association between KCNQ1 genetic variants and QT interval in a Chinese population (pages 1225–1229)

      W. Yu, F. Zhang, W. Hu, R. Zhang, C. Wang, J. Lu, F. Jiang, S. Tang, D. Peng, M. Chen, Y. Bao, K. Xiang, C. Hu and W. Jia

      Version of Record online: 20 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/dme.12237

    9. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Investigation of known estimated glomerular filtration rate loci in patients with Type 2 diabetes (pages 1230–1235)

      H. A. Deshmukh, C. N. A. Palmer, A. D. Morris and H. M. Colhoun

      Version of Record online: 14 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/dme.12211

      What's new?

      • This is the first study comparing common genetic variants associated with estimated GFR between the general population and patients with Type 2 diabetes.
      • This is the first report of the interaction of genetic effects of estimated GFR-associated loci (UMOD GCKR and SHROOM3) with albuminuria in patients with Type 2 diabetes.
      • The study stresses the need to adjust for albuminuria while investigating the genetic determinants of renal function.
    10. Health Economics

      The cost-effectiveness of the Dose Adjustment for Normal Eating (DAFNE) structured education programme: an update using the Sheffield Type 1 Diabetes Policy Model (pages 1236–1244)

      J. Kruger, A. Brennan, P. Thokala, H. Basarir, R. Jacques, J. Elliott, S. Heller and J. Speight

      Version of Record online: 19 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/dme.12270

      What's new?

      • The study uses new data from the National Institute for Health Research DAFNE research programme to estimate the cost-effectiveness of skills training in flexible intensive insulin therapy (as provided in the DAFNE programme) compared with no training.
      • The study updates an earlier economic evaluation of DAFNE using improved methods and new data.
      • The study extends the economic evaluation of DAFNE to cover a lifetime horizon and suggests that over this period the intervention is cost-effective from a National Health Service perspective despite limited long-term improvements in HbA1c.
    11. Patient time costs attributable to healthcare use in diabetes: results from the population-based KORA survey in Germany (pages 1245–1249)

      A. Icks, H. Claessen, K. Strassburger, R. Waldeyer, N. Chernyak, F. Jülich, W. Rathmann, B. Thorand, C. Meisinger, C. Huth, I.-M. Rückert, M. Schunk, G. Giani and R. Holle

      Version of Record online: 24 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/dme.12263

      What's new?

      • Patient time costs have been described as being considerable; however, data are highly limited. We estimated patient time costs attributable to outpatient and inpatient care in study participants with diagnosed diabetes, previously undetected diabetes, impaired glucose regulation and normal glucose tolerance.
      • Patient time costs were substantial—even higher than medication costs in the same study population. They are higher in participants with diagnosed diabetes, but also in those with undetected diabetes and impaired glucose regulation compared with those with normal glucose tolerance.
      • Research is needed in larger populations to receive more precise and definite estimates that can be used in health economic evaluation.
    12. Care Delivery

      Use of complementary markers in assessing glycaemic control in people with diabetic kidney disease undergoing iron or erythropoietin treatment (pages 1250–1254)

      J. Konya, J. M. Ng, H. Cox, M. Cooke, N. Lewis, S. Bhandari, S. L. Atkin and E. S. Kilpatrick

      Version of Record online: 9 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/dme.12249

      What's new?

      • HbA1c values are unreliable in patients with diabetes who receive iron and/or erythropoiesis-stimulating agents for their severe chronic kidney disease. This study shows that while HbA1c fell following both iron and erythropoiesis-stimulating agent treatment, mean blood glucose as well as other glycaemic markers (glycated albumin, fructosamine and 1,5 anhydroglucitol) remained unchanged.
      • HbA1c still correlated most closely with mean blood glucose overall. This suggests that combined use of HbA1c (to assess mean blood glucose) with another marker (to assess true changes in glycaemia following iron/erythropoiesis-stimulating agent treatment) may complement one another in this group of patients.
    13. Determinants of self-monitoring of blood glucose in patients with Type 1 diabetes: a multi-centre study in Brazil (pages 1255–1262)

      M. B. Gomes, L. R. M. Tannus, R. A. Cobas, A. S. M. Matheus, P. Dualib, A. T. Zucatti, C. Cani, A. D. Guedes, F. M. Santos, J. Sepulveda, M. Tolentino, M. C. Façanha, A. C. R. A. Faria, S. Lavigne, A. P. Montenegro, M. Rodacki, M. de Fatima Guedes, R. Szundy, M. M. Cordeiro, P. T. S. Santos, C. A. Negrato and on behalf of the Brazilian Type 1 Diabetes Study Group (BrazDiab1SG)

      Version of Record online: 13 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/dme.12236

  7. Letters

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Selection: This Month's Highlighted Articles
    3. Review Article
    4. Commentary
    5. Systematic Review
    6. Review Article
    7. Research Articles
    8. Letters
    9. Erratum
  8. Erratum

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Selection: This Month's Highlighted Articles
    3. Review Article
    4. Commentary
    5. Systematic Review
    6. Review Article
    7. Research Articles
    8. Letters
    9. Erratum
    1. You have free access to this content

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