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Oral Tranexamic Acid Enhances the Efficacy of Low-Fluence 1064-Nm Quality-Switched Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet Laser Treatment for Melasma in Koreans: A Randomized, Prospective Trial

Authors

  • Jung U Shin MD,

    1. Department of Dermatology, Severance Hospital, Cutaneous Biology Research Institute, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea
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    • The first two authors contributed equally to this work and should be considered as first authors.
  • Jihun Park MD,

    1. Department of Dermatology, Severance Hospital, Cutaneous Biology Research Institute, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea
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    • The first two authors contributed equally to this work and should be considered as first authors.
  • Sang Ho Oh MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Dermatology, Severance Hospital, Cutaneous Biology Research Institute, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea
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  • Ju Hee Lee MD, PhD

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Dermatology, Severance Hospital, Cutaneous Biology Research Institute, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea
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  • The authors have indicated no significant interest with commercial supporters.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Ju Hee Lee, MD, PhD, Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Biology Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, Korea, or e-mail: juhee@yuhs.ac

Abstract

Background

Tranexamic acid (TA) has recently gained in popularity in the treatment of pigmentary disorders.

Objective

To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of oral TA combined with low-fluence 1064-nm quality-switched neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (QSNY) laser for the treatment of melasma.

Materials and methods

Forty-eight patients with melasma were enrolled in the study and subsequently divided into two groups: a combination group and a laser treatment group. All patients were treated with two sessions of low-fluence QSNY laser, and patients in the combination group took 8 weeks of oral TA. Two blinded dermatologists evaluated patients using the Modified Melasma Area and Severity Index (mMASI) and a clinical improvement scale.

Results

Mean mMASI score 4 weeks after the second treatment decreased significantly in both groups from base line. Based on overall clinical improvement, a greater number of patients scored as grade 3 and more in the combination group; no patients were scored as grade 4 in the laser-alone group.

Conclusions

Oral TA may prove a safe and efficient treatment option for melasma in combination with low-fluence QSNY laser therapy.

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