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A case of tertiary neurosyphilis presenting with moth-eaten bone lesions

Authors

  • Xue-Gang Xu,

    1. Department of Dermatology, The Second Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, China
    2. Department of Dermatology, No.1 Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, China
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  • Yuan-Hong Li,

    1. Department of Dermatology, No.1 Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, China
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  • Xing-Hua Gao,

    1. Department of Dermatology, No.1 Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, China
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  • Hong-Duo Chen,

    1. Department of Dermatology, No.1 Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, China
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  • Ya-Qin Zhang

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Dermatology, The Second Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, China
    • Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Ya-Qin Zhang, MD, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Dermatology, The Second Hospital of Jilin University, 218 Zi-qiang Street, Changchun, 130041, China, or email: yaqingang@aol.com. Co-correspondence: Hong-Duo Chen, MD, Department of Dermatology, No.1 Hospital of China Medical University, 155 North Nanjing Street, Shenyang, 110001, China, or email: hongduochen@hotmail.com.

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  • Disclosure statement: The authors disclose no potential financial conflict of interest with this study.

Abstract

Syphilis, the “great imitator,” with regard to skin diseases, is a chronic systemic infectious disease with a clinical course that waxes and wanes. The incidence of tertiary syphilis had decreased drastically these decades. We report a case of tertiary neurosyphilis presenting with moth-eaten bone lesions of the lower extremities. To the best of our knowledge, we have not seen such reports.

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