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Ecology and Evolution

Cover image for Vol. 1 Issue 1

September 2011

Volume 1, Issue 1

Pages 0–105, i–ii

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. Original Research
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Issue Information (page 0)

      Article first published online: 29 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.43

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. Original Research
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Open debate and progress in ecology and evolution (pages i–ii)

      Allen J. Moore

      Article first published online: 13 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.5

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      It is a fundamental obligation of scientists to publish their work, to make it accessible to a wide audience and to contribute this knowledge to the community. Ecology and Evolution will publish some of the very best papers we can produce while preserving the originality of thought and diversity of opinion that is such a vital part of research

  3. Original Research

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. Original Research
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Natural selection on body size is mediated by multiple interacting factors: a comparison of beetle populations varying naturally and experimentally in body size (pages 1–14)

      Angela R. Amarillo-Suárez, R. Craig Stillwell and Charles W. Fox

      Article first published online: 20 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1

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      Resource quality and intraspecific competition may mediate selection on body size producing large-scale geographic patterns. In two sequential experiments, we examine how variation in larval competition and resource quality (seed size) affects the fitness consequences of variation in body size in a scramble-competing seed-feeding beetle, Stator limbatus.

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      Evolution and plasticity of anuran larval development in response to desiccation. A comparative analysis (pages 15–25)

      Alex Richter-Boix, Miguel Tejedo and Enrico L. Rezende

      Article first published online: 4 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.2

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      Anurans breed in a variety of aquatic habitats with contrasting levels of desiccation risk, which may result in selection for faster development during larval stages. Employing a comparative phylogenetic approach including data from published and unpublished studies encompassing 62 observations across 30 species, we tested if species breeding in ephemeral ponds (high risk) develop faster than those from permanent ponds (low risk) and/or show increased developmental plasticity in response to drying conditions.

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      Population delimitation across contrasting evolutionary clines in deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) (pages 26–36)

      D-S Yang and G. Kenagy

      Article first published online: 14 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.3

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      A concrete definition of a ‘population’ remains elusive. Two contrasting patterns of geographic variation in deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) converge within the state of Oregon, USA. Populations of these mice diverge morphologically across an east–west axis, and they diverge in mitochondrial DNA haplotypes across a north–south axis. We investigate these geographically contrasting patterns of differentiation in the context of ecological and evolutionary definitions (paradigms) of populations.

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      Oosorption in response to poor food: complexity in the trade-off between reproduction and survival (pages 37–45)

      Patricia J. Moore and Alfredo Attisano

      Article first published online: 20 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.4

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      We tested the hypothesis that oosorption is an evolved mechanism by which females can reallocate resources from current reproductive effort to survival and future reproduction, when conditions for reproduction are poor, by examining the reproductive physiology and life-history outcome under poor quality food in populations of the milkweed bug (Oncopeltus fasciatus) that have adapted to live on sunflower seed.

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      Phylogeography of the ant Myrmica rubra and its inquiline social parasite (pages 46–62)

      Jenni Leppänen, Kari Vepsäläinen and Riitta Savolainen

      Article first published online: 3 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.6

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      Widely distributed Palearctic insects are ideal for studying phylogeographic patterns owing to their high potential to survive in many Pleistocene refugia and—after glaciation—to recolonize vast, continuous areas. Nevertheless, such species have received little phylogeographic attention. Here, we investigate the Pleistocene refugia and subsequent postglacial colonization of the common, abundant, and widely distributed ant Myrmica rubra over most of its Palearctic area, using mitochondrial DNA.

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      Criteria for assessing climate change impacts on ecosystems (pages 63–72)

      Craig Loehle

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.7

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      There is concern about the potential impacts of climate change on species and ecosystems. To address this concern, a large body of literature has developed in which these impacts are assessed. In this study, criteria for conducting reliable and useful assessments of impacts of climate change are suggested.

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      Small founding number and low genetic diversity in an introduced species exhibiting limited invasion success (speckled dace, Rhinichthys osculus) (pages 73–84)

      Andrew P. Kinziger, Rodney J. Nakamoto, Eric C. Anderson and Bret C. Harvey

      Article first published online: 24 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.8

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      Molecular evaluations of successful invaders are common, however studies of introduced species that have had limited invasion success, or have died out completely, are rare. We studied an introduced population of speckled dace (Rhinichthys osculus) from northern California, USA that has rapidly increased in abundance but remained restricted to a 25-km stretch of river since its introduction in the mid-1980s.

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      Invasion of dwarf bamboo into alpine snow-meadows in northern Japan: pattern of expansion and impact on species diversity (pages 85–96)

      Gaku Kudo, Yukihiro Amagai, Buho Hoshino and Masami Kaneko

      Article first published online: 7 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.9

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      During the last 32 years a dwarf bamboo species, Sasa kurilensis, has expanded its distribution area by up to 47% toward snow-meadows, especially on southeastern facing slopes. Other plants are excluded after invasion by this dwarf bamboo, resulting in low species density. The rapid vegetation change in these almost pristine alpine environments isolated from human activity implies that global climate change already influences the alpine ecosystem.

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      Macroscale evolutionary patterns of flight muscle dimorphism in the carrion beetle Necrophila japonica (pages 97–105)

      Hiroshi Ikeda and Teiji Sota

      Article first published online: 9 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.15

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      Some insect species exhibit polymorphisms in flight muscles or wings, which provide opportunities for studying the factors that drive dispersal polymorphisms and the evolution of flightlessness in insects. We investigated the macroscale evolutionary pattern of flightlessness in the widespread Japanese beetle Necrophila japonica (Coleoptera: Silphidae), which exhibits flight muscle dimorphisms using phylogeographic approaches.

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