You have open access to this content

Ecology and Evolution

Cover image for Vol. 1 Issue 2

October 2011

Volume 1, Issue 2

Pages 0–227

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Research
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Issue Information (page i)

      Article first published online: 13 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.63

  2. Original Research

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Research
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Spatial-genetic structuring in a red-breasted merganser (Mergus serrator) colony in the Canadian Maritimes (pages 107–118)

      David J. Fishman, Shawn R. Craik, David Zadworny and Rodger D. Titman

      Article first published online: 19 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.10

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Using polymorphic microsatellites, we had set out to characterize the level of genetic-spatial organization within a colony of female red-breasted mergansers (Mergus serrator) breeding on a series of small barrier islands in Kouchibouguac National Park, NB, Canada. Additionally, using nesting data from this colony, we explored possibilities for the existence of kin associations and/or cooperative interactions between these individuals; specifically in the form of the synchronization of breeding activities (i.e., incubation initiation).

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Life-history traits maintain the genomic integrity of sympatric species of the spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) group on an isolated forest island (pages 119–131)

      Lisa M. Lumley and Felix A.H. Sperling

      Article first published online: 11 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.11

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We sought to determine how many species of the spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) complex reside in Cypress Hills, an isolated remnant coniferous forest in western Canada. We integrated data on behavior, ecology, morphology, mitochondrial DNA, and simple sequence repeats, comparing Cypress Hills populations to those from other regions of North America to determine which species they resembled most.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Ungulate preference for burned patches reveals strength of fire–grazing interaction (pages 132–144)

      Brady W. Allred, Samuel D. Fuhlendorf, David M. Engle and R. Dwayne Elmore

      Article first published online: 12 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.12

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The interactions between fire and grazing are widespread throughout fire–dependent landscapes. The utilization of burned areas by grazing animals establishes the fire–grazing interaction, but the preference for recently burned areas relative to other influences (water, topography, etc.) is unknown. In this study, we determine the strength of the fire–grazing interaction by quantifying the influence of fire on ungulate site selection. We compare the preference for recently burned patches relative to the influence of other environmental factors that contribute to site selection; compare that preference between native and introduced ungulates; test relationships between area burned and herbivore preference; and determine forage quality and quantity as mechanisms of site selection. We used two large ungulate species at two grassland locations within the southern Great Plains, USA

    4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Variation in MHC genotypes in two populations of house sparrow (Passer domesticus) with different population histories (pages 145–159)

      Åsa Alexandra Borg, Sindre Andre Pedersen, Henrik Jensen and Helena Westerdahl

      Article first published online: 8 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.13

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Small populations are likely to have a low genetic ability for disease resistance due to loss of genetic variation through inbreeding and genetic drift. We evaluated inter- and intrapopulation variation in MHC genotypes between an inbred (Aldra) and a relatively outbred population (Hestmannøy) of house sparrows (Passer domesticus) in a metapopulation at Helgeland, Norway. Genomic (gDNA) and transcribed (cDNA) alleles of functional MHC class I and IIB loci, along with neutral noncoding microsatellite markers, were analyzed to obtain relevant estimates of genetic variation.

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Adaptation to a seasonally varying environment: a strong latitudinal cline in reproductive diapause combined with high gene flow in Drosophila montana (pages 160–168)

      Venera I. Tyukmaeva, Tiina S. Salminen, Maaria Kankare, K. Emily Knott and Anneli Hoikkala

      Article first published online: 13 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.14

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Adaption to seasonal changes in the northern hemisphere include an ability to predict the forthcoming cold season from gradual changes in environmental cues early enough to prepare for the harsh winter conditions. The magnitude and speed of changes in these cues vary between the latitudes, which induces strong selection pressures for local adaptation. We studied adaptation to seasonal changes in Drosophila montana, a northern maltfly, by defining the photoperiodic conditions leading to adult reproductive diapause along a latitudinal cline in Finland and by measuring genetic differentiation and the amount of gene flow between the sampling sites with microsatellites.

    6. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Comparison of population-genetic structuring in congeneric kelp- versus rock-associated snails: a test of a dispersal-by-rafting hypothesis (pages 169–180)

      Raisa Nikula, Hamish G. Spencer and Jonathan M. Waters

      Article first published online: 22 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.16

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Phylogeographic studies indicate that many marine invertebrates lacking autonomous dispersal ability are able to achieve trans-oceanic colonization by rafting on buoyant macroalgae. However, less is known about the impact of rafting on on-going population-genetic connectivity of intertidal species associated with buoyant macroalgae. We hypothesize that such species will have higher levels of population-genetic connectivity than those exploiting nonbuoyant substrates such as rock. We tested this hypothesis by comparing nuclear multilocus population-genetic structuring in two sister topshell species, which both have a planktonic larval phase but are fairly well segregated by their habitat preference of low-tidal bull-kelp holdfasts versus mid-to-low tidal bare rock.

    7. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Multimodal dispersal during the range expansion of the tropical house gecko Hemidactylus mabouia (pages 181–190)

      Kristen H. Short and Kenneth Petren

      Article first published online: 12 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.18

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Dispersal influences both the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of range expansion. While some studies have demonstrated a role for human-mediated dispersal during invasion, the genetic effects of such dispersal remain to be understood, particularly in terrestrial range expansions. In this study we investigated multimodal dispersal during the range expansion of the invasive gecko Hemidactylus mabouia in Florida using 12 microsatellite loci. We investigated dispersal patterns at the regional scale (metropolitan areas), statewide scale (state of Florida), and global scale (including samples from the native range).

    8. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Post-Pleistocene range expansion of the recently imperiled eastern little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus lucifugus) from a single southern refugium (pages 191–200)

      Michael D. Dixon

      Article first published online: 1 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.20

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Myotis lucifugus, once among the most widespread and common bats in North America, has been forecast to be extirpated east of the Rockies in as few as 16 years by the spread of white-nose syndrome. Recent genetic research has demonstrated that this species is paraphyletic and part of a broader species complex; however, only one lineage (Myotis lucifugus lucifugus [M. l. lucifugus]) is present in eastern North America. I used molecular tools and niche modeling to validate this and investigate the role that historical biogeography has played in the phylogenetic and population genetic structure of this species to determine if the eastern subspecies represents an evolutionarily distinct population.

    9. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The habitat disruption induces immune-suppression and oxidative stress in honey bees (pages 201–217)

      Tomomi Morimoto, Yuriko Kojima, Taku Toki, Yayoi Komeda, Mikio Yoshiyama, Kiyoshi Kimura, Keijiro Nirasawa and Tatsuhiko Kadowaki

      Article first published online: 8 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.21

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The honey bee is a major insect used for pollination of many commercial crops worldwide. Although the use of honey bees for pollination can disrupt the habitat, the effects on their physiology have never been determined. In this study, we characterized the physiological states of honey bees used for long-term pollination in strawberry and eggplant greenhouses. To understand the physiological states of honey bees used for long-term pollination in greenhouses, we characterized their gene expression profiles by microarray.

    10. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Genetic Connectivity among Populations of an Endangered Snake Species from Southeastern Australia (Hoplocephalus bungaroides, Elapidae) (pages 218–227)

      Sylvain Dubey, Joanna Sumner, David A. Pike, J. Scott Keogh, Jonathan K. Webb and Richard Shine

      Article first published online: 16 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.25

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The broad-headed snake, Hoplocephalus bungaroides, is a small venomous species restricted to a handful of disjunct reserves near Sydney, Australia. Mark-recapture studies have indicated low vagility for this ambush predator, suggesting that gene flow also may be low. However, our analyses of 11 microsatellite loci from 163 snakes collected in Morton National Park, from six sites within a 10-km diameter, suggest relatively high rates of gene flow among sites.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION