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Habitat use, home range, movements and interactions of introduced Lepomis gibbosus and native Salmo trutta in a small stream of Southern England

Authors

  • Saulius Stakėnas,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Freshwater Ecology, Institute of Ecology, Nature Research Centre, Akademijos 2, Vilnius, Lithuania
    • Salmon & Freshwater Team, Centre for Environment, Fisheries & Aquaculture Science, Lowestoft, U.K
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  • Lorenzo Vilizzi,

    1. Murray-Darling Freshwater Research Centre, Wodonga, Australia
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  • Gordon H. Copp

    1. Salmon & Freshwater Team, Centre for Environment, Fisheries & Aquaculture Science, Lowestoft, U.K
    2. Centre for Conservation Ecology and Environmental Science, Bournemouth University, Poole, Dorset, UK
    3. Environmental and Life Sciences Graduate Program, Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario, Canada
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  • This article is published with the permission of the Controller of HMSO and the Queen's Printer for Scotland.

Correspondence: S. Stakėnas, Department of Freshwater Ecology, Institute of Ecology, Nature Research Centre, Akademijos 2, LT-08412, Vilnius, Lithuania. E-mail: saulius.stakenas@gmail.com

Abstract

Radio telemetry data were analysed to assess the microhabitat use, movement patterns, home range overlap and interspecific interactions of non-native pumpkinseed Lepomis gibbosus (L.) and native brown trout Salmo trutta (L.) in a small English stream located immediately below a commercial angling lake from which pumpkinseed escaped. Although both species favoured pool habitats, brown trout preferred higher velocities and coarser substrata compared with pumpkinseed. Also, some individual brown trout preferred deeper waters than did pumpkinseed. Home range area of brown trout was substantially larger than that of pumpkinseed in spring and summer, and for both species, home range area in autumn was significantly smaller than in the other seasons. Range centre distribution analysis revealed that both species were distributed significantly nonrandomly within the stream during all seasons. There was substantial home range overlap between the two species in all seasons, the greatest being in spring. Overall distances moved were greatest during spring for both species, with brown trout moving greater distances relative to pumpkinseed. However, the absence of mutual attraction or avoidance between the species, as well as the lack of cohesion in preferred habitats and strong territorial fidelity, suggests little or no impact of introduced pumpkinseed on resident brown trout.

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