Population structure of Chrysoporthe austroafricana in southern Africa determined using Vegetative Compatibility Groups (VCGs)

Authors

  • M. Vermeulen,

    1. Department of Microbiology & Plant Pathology, DST/NRF Centre of Excellence in Tree Health Biotechnology (CTHB), Forestry & Agricultural Biotechnology Institute (FABI), University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa
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  • M. Gryzenhout,

    1. Department of Plant Sciences, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa
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  • M. J. Wingfield,

    1. Department of Microbiology & Plant Pathology, DST/NRF Centre of Excellence in Tree Health Biotechnology (CTHB), Forestry & Agricultural Biotechnology Institute (FABI), University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa
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  • J. Roux

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Microbiology & Plant Pathology, DST/NRF Centre of Excellence in Tree Health Biotechnology (CTHB), Forestry & Agricultural Biotechnology Institute (FABI), University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa
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E-mail: Jolanda.Roux@fabi.up.ac.za

Summary

Chrysoporthe austroafricana is one of the most damaging pathogens of Eucalyptus trees in southern Africa. It also occurs on non-native Tibouchina granulosa trees and native Syzygium species. Additional isolates of the pathogen from previously unstudied countries in the region have become available from survey studies. The aim of this study was to use VCGs to consider the diversity in populations of isolates collected in various countries in southern Africa (Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa and Zambia) and from different hosts. We also wanted to determine whether there are shared VCGs among these countries and hosts in southern Africa and establish a VCG tester strain database. Results showed a high diversity amongst isolates from different countries and hosts, but suggested little movement of VCGs among countries or hosts based on the available isolates. A total of 108 VCG tester strains were identified for southern Africa.

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