Clinical high-risk state does not predict later psychosis in a delinquent adolescent population

Authors

  • Marko Manninen,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare
    2. Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki
    • Corresponding author: Mr Marko Manninen, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare, PO Box 30, FI-00271 Helsinki, Finland. Email: marko.manninen@thl.fi

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  • Maija Lindgren,

    1. Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare
    2. Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki
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  • Sebastian Therman,

    1. Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare
    2. Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki
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  • Matti Huttunen,

    1. Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare
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  • Hanna Ebeling,

    1. Clinic of Child Psychiatry, Oulu University and University Hospital, Oulu, Finland
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  • Irma Moilanen,

    1. Clinic of Child Psychiatry, Oulu University and University Hospital, Oulu, Finland
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  • Jaana Suvisaari

    1. Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare
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Abstract

Aim

Adolescents with severe disruptive behaviour have an elevated risk for adult psychosis. We investigated whether the Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes (SIPS) is a useful psychosis risk-screening tool for adolescents with disruptive behaviour.

Method

Fifty-three adolescents residing in a reform school due to severe behavioural problems were interviewed with SIPS to ascertain clinical high-risk (CHR) state. CHR status was compared to self-reported psychiatric problems, and to registry data on hospital treatments for mental health disorders during a 5-year follow-up time.

Results

CHR was associated with self-reported internalizing problems and thought problems. It failed to predict psychoses but was associated with hospital treatment for mood and conduct disorders.

Conclusion

The SIPS interview has limited power for predicting psychosis among adolescents with severe behavioural problems. However, SIPS appears to be useful for screening and predicting other psychiatric problems.

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