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The significance of possible selves in patients of an early intervention programme for psychotic disorders

Authors

  • Ross M.G. Norman,

    Corresponding author
    1. Prevention and Early Intervention Program for Psychoses (PEPP), London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario, Canada
    2. Department of Psychiatry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada
    • Corresponding author: Dr Ross M.G. Norman, Department of Psychiatry and Epidemiology & Biostatistics, University of Western Ontario, London Health Sciences – Victoria Hospital, A2-643, 800 Commissioners Road, East, London, ON, Canada, N6A 5W9. Email: rnorman@uwo.ca

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  • Deborah Windell,

    1. Prevention and Early Intervention Program for Psychoses (PEPP), London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario, Canada
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  • Jill Lynch,

    1. Prevention and Early Intervention Program for Psychoses (PEPP), London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario, Canada
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  • Rahul Manchanda

    1. Prevention and Early Intervention Program for Psychoses (PEPP), London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario, Canada
    2. Department of Psychiatry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada
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Abstract

Aims

To assess the possible importance of patients' perceptions of possible future selves in determining self-esteem and mood.

Methods

One hundred and two patients of an early intervention programme for psychotic disorders completed measures of perceived positive and negative current and possible future selves, as well as indices of self-esteem and mood.

Results

Measures of current and possible selves generally showed bivariate correlations with self-esteem, depression and anger/hostility. Perceived negative possible self was the most important independent predictor of self-esteem, depression and anger/hostility.

Conclusions

Perceptions of possible negative future selves may be a particularly important determinant of self-esteem and negative mood states. Addressing fears about possible future self is likely to be an important aspect of recovery from psychotic disorders.

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