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Migrant background and ethnic minority status as predictors for duration of untreated psychosis

Authors

  • Mari Nerhus,

    1. Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Oslo, Norway
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  • Akiah Ottesen Berg,

    1. Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Oslo, Norway
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  • Marit Haram,

    1. Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Oslo, Norway
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  • Levi Røstad Kvitland,

    1. Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Oslo, Norway
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  • Ole Andreas Andreassen,

    1. Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Oslo, Norway
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  • Ingrid Melle

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Oslo, Norway
    • Corresponding author: Dr Ingrid Melle, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research Ullevaal Hospital Building 49, P.O. Box 4956 Nydalen, N-0424 Oslo, Norway. Email: ingrid.melle@medisin.uio.no

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Abstract

Aim

The aim of the study was to explore if patients with migration and/or ethnic minority background have longer duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) than patients from the reference population, and in case to what extent this was best explained by ethnic minority status or migration background, including age at migration.

Methods

Four hundred sixty-two first-episode patients were included. The Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition Axis I Disorders was used for diagnostic purposes. Patients were interviewed about migration history and ethnicity using structured questionnaires.

Results

Being part of an ethnic minority group had a trend-level significance, and migration after the age of 6 had a statistically significant association with prolonged DUP.

Conclusions

Age at migration has a moderate, but statistically significant effect on DUP. The findings indicate migrating after school start is associated with a longer DUP in immigrant populations.

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