Development and pilot testing of an online monitoring tool of depression symptoms and side effects for young people being treated for depression

Authors

  • Sarah E. Hetrick,

    Corresponding author
    1. Centre for Excellence in Youth Mental Health, Orygen Youth Health Research Centre, Centre for Youth Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    • Corresponding author: Dr Sarah E. Hetrick, Centre for Excellence in Youth Mental Health, Orygen Youth Health Research Centre, Centre for Youth Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, Locked Bag 10, Parkville, Melbourne, Vic. 3052, Australia. Email: shetrick@unimelb.edu.au

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  • Maria Kristina Dellosa,

    1. School of Psychological Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
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    • The study was undertaken while Ms Dellosa was a student at the University of Melbourne; Kristina is now working at the Youth Mood Clinic, Orygen Youth Health, Locked Bag 10, Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia.
  • Magenta B. Simmons,

    1. Centre for Excellence in Youth Mental Health, Orygen Youth Health Research Centre, Centre for Youth Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
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  • Lisa Phillips

    1. Department of Psychology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
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Abstract

Aim

To develop and examine the feasibility of an online monitoring tool of depressive symptoms, suicidality and side effects.

Methods

The online tool was developed based on guideline recommendations, and employed already validated and widely used measures. Quantitative data about its use, and qualitative information on its functionality and usefulness were collected from surveys, a focus group and individual interviews.

Results

Fifteen young people completed the tool between 1 and 12 times, and reported it was easy to use. Clinicians suggested it was too long and could be completed in the waiting room to lessen impact on session time. Overall, clients and clinicians who used the tool found it useful.

Conclusions

Results show that an online monitoring tool is potentially useful as a systematic means for monitoring symptoms, but further research is needed including how to embed the tool within clinical practice.

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