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FEBS Journal

Cover image for Vol. 278 Issue 5

March 2011

Volume 278, Issue 5

Pages 687–860

  1. Review Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Review Articles
    3. Original Articles
    4. Corrigendum
    5. Author index
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      Macromolecular NMR spectroscopy for the non-spectroscopist (pages 687–703)

      Ann H. Kwan, Mehdi Mobli, Paul R. Gooley, Glenn F. King and Joel P. Mackay

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08004.x

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      NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying the structure and function of biological macromolecules. As the first of two reviews on macromolecular NMR spectroscopy aimed at the non-spectroscopist, we provide an introduction to the technique, including sample requirements, what to expect from simple NMR experiments, NMR structure determination and how to judge the quality of NMR-derived structures.

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      Macromolecular NMR spectroscopy for the non-spectroscopist: beyond macromolecular solution structure determination (pages 704–715)

      Michael Bieri, Ann H. Kwan, Mehdi Mobli, Glenn F. King, Joel P. Mackay and Paul R. Gooley

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08005.x

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      In the second of two articles intended for non-spectroscopists, we describe major uses of NMR in protein science beyond solution structure determination, including the use of NMR to monitor molecular properties, behaviours and interactions as well as to measure protein dynamics. Finally, we outline new and expanding NMR areas of interest to researchers in the life sciences.

  2. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Review Articles
    3. Original Articles
    4. Corrigendum
    5. Author index
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      Structural evidence of α-aminoacylated lipoproteins of Staphylococcus aureus (pages 716–728)

      Miwako Asanuma, Kenji Kurokawa, Rie Ichikawa, Kyoung-Hwa Ryu, Jun-Ho Chae, Naoshi Dohmae, Bok Luel Lee and Hiroshi Nakayama

      Article first published online: 12 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2010.07990.x

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      The determination of exact lipidated structures of Staphylococcus aureus lipoproteins is crucial for elucidating the molecular basis of the interaction of host microorganisms. Based on analytical data of lipoprotein lipase treatment and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), we demonstrate that major lipoproteins of S. aureus are mainly in the N-acylated triacyl form, suggesting that S. aureus has an unidentified enzyme catalyzing N-acylation of diacylated lipoproteins.

      Corrected by:

      Erratum

      Vol. 278, Issue 7, 1186, Article first published online: 9 MAR 2011

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      Enhancing the protein production levels in Escherichia coli with a strong promoter (pages 729–739)

      Hanna Tegel, Jenny Ottosson and Sophia Hober

      Article first published online: 12 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2010.07991.x

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      In order to further understand the underlying reasons for different protein production levels in Escherichia coli, the effects of three different promoters (T7, trc and lacUV5) were investigated. The total amount of target protein as well as the amount of soluble protein was analyzed and correlated to the transcription levels. Regulation of protein production was shown to be a combination of the transcription and translation efficiency.

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      Requirement for asparagine in the aquaporin NPA sequence signature motifs for cation exclusion (pages 740–748)

      Dorothea Wree, Binghua Wu, Thomas Zeuthen and Eric Beitz

      Article first published online: 12 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2010.07993.x

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      Aquaporins (AQP) contain two highly conserved Asn-Pro-Ala (NPA) motifs. We functionally characterised a novel aquaglyceroporin from Burkholderia cenocepacia carrying one SPA instead of NPA. Asn and Ser were freely interchangeable at both NPA sites without affecting protein expression, water, glycerol, and methylamine permeability. An analogous mammalian AQP1 N76S mutant excluded protons and potassium, yet leaked sodium ions.

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      The subcellular organization of strictosidine biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus epidermis highlights several trans-tonoplast translocations of intermediate metabolites (pages 749–763)

      Grégory Guirimand, Anthony Guihur, Olivia Ginis, Pierre Poutrain, François Héricourt, Audrey Oudin, Arnaud Lanoue, Benoit St-Pierre, Vincent Burlat and Vincent Courdavault

      Article first published online: 12 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2010.07994.x

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      In Catharanthus roseus epidermis, strictosidine biosynthesis and deglucosylation occur in the vacuole and the nucleus, respectively, whereas strictosidine precursors (tryptamine and secologanin) are synthesized in the cytosol. This complex subcellular compartmentation implicates orientated translocation events across the tonoplast for intermediate metabolites, and could account for the regulation of the biosynthesis of the anticancer monoterpene indole alkaloids vinblastine and vincristine.

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      Lipins from plants are phosphatidate phosphatases that restore lipid synthesis in a pah1Δ mutant strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (pages 764–775)

      Elzbieta Mietkiewska, Rodrigo M. P. Siloto, Jay Dewald, Saleh Shah, David N. Brindley and Randall J. Weselake

      Article first published online: 12 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2010.07995.x

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      We describe the functional characterization of Arabidopsis and Brassica napus homologues of the phosphatidate phosphohydrolase gene (PAH1). Recombinant expression studies confirmed that homologous PAHs from plants can rescue different phenotypes exhibited by the yeast pah1Δ strain. In addition, we demonstrated that conserved residues G83, D707, D709 and S752 are required for phosphatidate phosphatase activity of Arabidopsis PAH1, but are not required for nuclear localization.

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      Glucose oxidase prevents programmed cell death of the silkworm anterior silk gland through hydrogen peroxide production (pages 776–785)

      Hiroto Matsui, Motonori Kakei, Masafumi Iwami and Sho Sakurai

      Article first published online: 24 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2010.07996.x

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      We identified an inhibitory factor against programmed cell death (PCD) of silkworm anterior silk glands as glucose oxidase (GOD). GOD catalyzes the oxidation of glucose and generates hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide inhibitsthe execution of PCD during the feeding stage. At the onset of spinning, GOD is discharged with silk thread, and then the execution of PCD starts for metamorphosis.

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      microRNA-203 suppresses bladder cancer development by repressing bcl-w expression (pages 786–792)

      Juanjie Bo, Guoliang Yang, Kailing Huo, Haifeng Jiang, Lianhua Zhang, Dongming Liu and Yiran Huang

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2010.07997.x

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      We verified that the expression of microRNA-203 (miR-203) was decreased in bladder cancer tissues. Moreover, ectopic expression of miR-203 promoted the apoptosis of human bladder cancer cell lines. The expression of miR-203 decreased both in vitro and in vivo. Western blot analysis showed that the expression level of miR-203 was negatively correlated with bcl-w level in tumor tissues.

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      Structures of type B ribose 5-phosphate isomerase from Trypanosoma cruzi shed light on the determinants of sugar specificity in the structural family (pages 793–808)

      Ana L. Stern, Agata Naworyta, Juan J. Cazzulo and Sherry L. Mowbray

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2010.07999.x

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      Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (Rpi) is a key activity of the pentose phosphate pathway. Kinetic studies of RpiB from Trypanosoma cruzi show it can isomerize d-ribose 5-phosphate, but not d-allose 6-phosphate; the latter instead inhibits the enzyme. The Escherichia coli enzyme can isomerize both types of sugars. X-ray structures show how changes in a loop near the active site can explain the difference.

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      The structure of maize polyamine oxidase K300M mutant in complex with the natural substrates provides a snapshot of the catalytic mechanism of polyamine oxidation (pages 809–821)

      Annarita Fiorillo, Rodolfo Federico, Fabio Polticelli, Alberto Boffi, Franco Mazzei, Massimo Di Fusco, Andrea Ilari and Paraskevi Tavladoraki

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2010.08000.x

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      Structural bases governing the catalytic mechanism of polyamine oxidation by Zea Mays polyamine oxidase were revealed by studying the crystal structure of its K300M mutant. The data demonstrate that a water molecule (HOH309) hydrogen-bound to the amino group of the K300 side chain is involved in the correct positioning of the substrates within the active site, modulates the FAD redox potential and participates in the FAD reoxidation reaction.

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      A distinct sequence in the adenine nucleotide translocase from Artemia franciscana embryos is associated with insensitivity to bongkrekate and atypical effects of adenine nucleotides on Ca2+ uptake and sequestration (pages 822–836)

      Csaba Konràd, Gergely Kiss, Beata Töröcsik, János L. Lábár, Akos A. Gerencser, Miklós Mándi, Vera Adam-Vizi and Christos Chinopoulos

      Article first published online: 24 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2010.08001.x

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      In mitochondria isolated from Artemia embryos, bongkrekate had no effect on either Ca2+ uptake or the ADP-ATP exchange rate. The Artemia mRNA coding for the adenine nucleotide translocase transcribes a protein that exhibits a stretch of amino acids in the 198-225 region with 48-56% similarity to those from other species, including the deletion of three amino acids in positions 211, 212 and 219.

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      Nuclear factor kappa B and tumor necrosis factor-alpha modulation of transcription of the mouse testis- and pre-implantation development-specific Rnf33/Trim60 gene (pages 837–850)

      Kong-Bung Choo, Min-Chuan Hsu, Yao-Hui Tsai, Wan-Yi Lin and Chiu-Jung Huang

      Article first published online: 2 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2010.08002.x

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      Rnf33/Trim60 is a mouse preimplantation development- and testis-specific gene. In luciferase assay, EMSA and siRNA knockdown experiments, Rnf33 is shown to be regulated by the p65/p50 NF-κB subunits and by ΤΝFα via an intronic κB element. Our data are consistent with involvement of the RNF33 protein in spermatogenesis via interaction with kinesin motor proteins of the microtubule (submitted).

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      Identification of the N-terminal region of TjZNT2, a Zrt/Irt-like protein family metal transporter, as a novel functional region involved in metal ion selectivity (pages 851–858)

      Sho Nishida, Yasuhiro Morinaga, Hitoshi Obata and Takafumi Mizuno

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08003.x

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      We found that different ion specificities between two plant metal transporters of the ZIP family, TjZNT1 and TjZNT2, are derived from the different N-terminal structures. The ion selectivity of TjZNT2 was changed by the truncations of its N-terminal extension that is absent in native TjZNT1. Our results suggest that the N-terminus is a novel substrate selector in the ZIP family.

  3. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Review Articles
    3. Original Articles
    4. Corrigendum
    5. Author index
    1. You have free access to this content
      Corrigendum (page 859)

      Article first published online: 17 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08009.x

  4. Author index

    1. Top of page
    2. Review Articles
    3. Original Articles
    4. Corrigendum
    5. Author index
    1. You have free access to this content
      Author index (page 860)

      Article first published online: 17 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2010.07841.x

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