You have free access to this content

The FEBS Journal

Cover image for Vol. 278 Issue 7

April 2011

Volume 278, Issue 7

Pages 1001–1187

  1. Minireview Series

    1. Top of page
    2. Minireview Series
    3. Minireview
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Erratum
    7. Author Index
    1. You have free access to this content
      Vertebrate sex determination: questioning the hierarchy (page 1001)

      Amaury Herpin and Manfred Schartl

      Version of Record online: 25 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08028.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An introduction to a minireview series that describes the canonical mammalian sex determination pathway, focusing on the relationships between SRY and its direct SOX9 downstream target and their regulation, and the exciting questions connected to DMRT1’s role as a master sex determinant in fish, frog and birds.

  2. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Minireview Series
    3. Minireview
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Erratum
    7. Author Index
    1. You have free access to this content
      Sex determination and the control of Sox9 expression in mammals (pages 1002–1009)

      Susanne Jakob and Robin Lovell-Badge

      Version of Record online: 25 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08029.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The autosomal gene Sox9 is essential for Sertoli cell differentiation, and consequently for testis determination, in mammals. Sox9 is subject to positive and negative regulatory controls in the early gonad, which establish its activity or silence, promoting the male or female pathway. Initial decisions are reinforced and maintained throughout life by feedback loops and by reciprocal repression of the opposite pathway.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Dmrt1 genes at the crossroads: a widespread and central class of sexual development factors in fish (pages 1010–1019)

      Amaury Herpin and Manfred Schartl

      Version of Record online: 25 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08030.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A remarkable amount of descriptive expression data has been gathered in a large variety of fish, in particular with respect to early gonadal differentiation and sex change. This minireview aims at distilling the current knowledge of fish dmrt1s, in terms of expression and regulation. It is shown how gonadal identities correlate with dimorphic dmrt1 expression in gonochoristic and hermaphroditic fish species. In addition, it is also described how sex steroid hormones affect gonadal identity and dmrt1 expression

    3. You have free access to this content
      A ZZ/ZW-type sex determination in Xenopus laevis (pages 1020–1026)

      Shin Yoshimoto and Michihiko Ito

      Version of Record online: 25 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08031.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A W-linked gene, DM-W was isolated as a paralogue of DMRT1 in Xenopus laevis. In this review, we discuss recent findings from the discovery of DM-W in terms of its molecular evolution and its function as a female sex-determining gene, and introduce a new model for a ZZ/ZW-type sex determination elicited by DM-W and DMRT1 in this species.

    4. You have free access to this content
      Sex determination and sexual differentiation in the avian model (pages 1027–1034)

      Justin Chue and Craig A. Smith

      Version of Record online: 25 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08032.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This mini-review summarises our current understanding of avian sex determination and gonadal development. In particular, the recent demonstration that sex is cell autonomous in birds and the key role of DMRT1 in testis development are discussed. FOXL2 and RSPO-1 appear to have a conserved role in ovarian development.

  3. Review Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Minireview Series
    3. Minireview
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Erratum
    7. Author Index
    1. You have free access to this content
      Trypanosoma brucei: a model micro-organism to study eukaryotic phospholipid biosynthesis (pages 1035–1046)

      Mauro Serricchio and Peter Bütikofer

      Version of Record online: 3 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08012.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma brucei, can acquire lipids from its environment, however, it is also capable of de novo synthesis of all major phospholipid classes. To promote trypanosomes as a model organism to study lipid biosynthesis, we review the pathways involved in phospholipid formation in T. brucei and highlight differences to corresponding pathways in other eukaryotes.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Oxylipins in fungi (pages 1047–1063)

      Florian Brodhun and Ivo Feussner

      Version of Record online: 23 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08027.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Several fungi are known to produce diverse fatty acid derived oxidized metabolites, the oxylipins. While much information about biosynthetic pathways and the physiological significance of these bioactive compounds in plants and mammals accumulated during time, the knowledge about fungal oxylipins is still scarce. This review aims to present a synopsis of the scientific progress made over the last years.

    3. You have free access to this content
      α-enolase: a promising therapeutic and diagnostic tumor target (pages 1064–1074)

      Michela Capello, Sammy Ferri-Borgogno, Paola Cappello and Francesco Novelli

      Version of Record online: 24 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08025.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In tumor cells, the metabolic enzyme α-enolase is up-regulated and supports anaerobic proliferation (Warburg effect). It is expressed at the cell surface, where it promotes cancer invasion, and is subjected to a specific array of post-translational modifications. Both α-enolase overexpression and its post-translational modifications can trigger a specific humoral and cellular immune response and could be of diagnostic and prognostic value in cancer.

  4. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Minireview Series
    3. Minireview
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Erratum
    7. Author Index
    1. You have free access to this content
      2-Amino-nonyl-6-methoxyl-tetralin muriate activity against Candida albicans augments endogenous reactive oxygen species production – a microarray analysis study (pages 1075–1085)

      Rong Mei Liang, Xiao Lan Yong, Yun Ping Jiang, Yong Hong Tan, Bao Di Dai, Shi Hua Wang, Ting Ting Hu, Xi Chen, Nan Li, Zhao Hui Dong, Xiao Chun Huang, Jun Chen, Yong Bing Cao and Yuan Ying Jiang

      Version of Record online: 23 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08021.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      10b treatment decreased the expression of energy metabolism-related genes, increased generation of endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS), decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (AM−1·m), ubiquinone-cytochrome C reductase (complex III) activity and intracellular ATP level in Candida albicans SC5314 strain. Also, addition of antioxidant ascorbic acid (AA) reduced the antifungal activity of 10b significantly.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Factor-inhibiting hypoxia-inducible factor (FIH) catalyses the post-translational hydroxylation of histidinyl residues within ankyrin repeat domains (pages 1086–1097)

      Ming Yang, Rasheduzzaman Chowdhury, Wei Ge, Refaat B. Hamed, Michael A. McDonough, Timothy D. W. Claridge, Benedikt M. Kessler, Matthew E. Cockman, Peter J. Ratcliffe and Christopher J. Schofield

      Version of Record online: 23 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08022.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Factor-inhibiting hypoxia-inducible factor (FIH) is an asparaginyl hydroxylase that catalyses the β-hydroxylation of an Asn-residue in the C-terminal transcriptional activation domain of the hypoxia inducible factor and of highly conserved Asn-residues within the ubiquitous ankyrin repeat domain protein family. Here we report that FIH also catalyses the β-hydroxylation of histidinyl residues in the ankyrin repeat domain of tankyrase-2, further expanding the scope of FIH-catalysed hydroxylations.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Secondary substrate binding strongly affects activity and binding affinity of Bacillus subtilis and Aspergillus niger GH11 xylanases (pages 1098–1111)

      Sven Cuyvers, Emmie Dornez, Mohammad N. Rezaei, Annick Pollet, Jan A. Delcour and Christophe M. Courtin

      Version of Record online: 16 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08023.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The secondary substrate binding site (SBS) of Bacillus subtilis and Aspergillus niger glycoside hydrolase family 11 xylanases was studied by site-directed mutagenesis and evaluation of activity and binding properties of mutant enzymes on different substrates. Modification of the SBS resulted in a decreased relative activity on polymeric versus oligomeric substrates and a decreased binding affinity on natural substrates.

    4. You have free access to this content
      Modulation of F0F1-ATP synthase activity by cyclophilin D regulates matrix adenine nucleotide levels (pages 1112–1125)

      Christos Chinopoulos, Csaba Konràd, Gergely Kiss, Eugeniy Metelkin, Beata Töröcsik, Steven F. Zhang and Anatoly A. Starkov

      Version of Record online: 23 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08026.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cyclophilin D binds to the F0F1-ATP synthase and decreases its activity, without altering the the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT)-mediated ATP flux rates in intact mitochondria. This is attributed to the ∼2.2 times lower flux control coefficient of F0F1-ATP synthase than that of ANT. Therefore, in intact mitochondria the absence of cyclophilin D or its inhibition by cyclosporin A affects only matrix adenine nucleotides levels.

    5. You have free access to this content
      The Arabidopsis protein kinase Pto-interacting 1-4 is a common target of the oxidative signal-inducible 1 and mitogen-activated protein kinases (pages 1126–1136)

      Celine Forzani, Alessandro Carreri, Sergio de la Fuente van Bentem, David Lecourieux, Fatma Lecourieux and Heribert Hirt

      Version of Record online: 25 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08033.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This study analysed how the protein kinase Pto-interacting 1-4 (PTI1-4) signals in Arabidopsis. Our results showed in vivo that PTI1-4 was found in the same protein complex with OXI1 or with MPK6. In addition, OXI1 and MPK6 were able in vitro to phosphorylate PTI1-4. These results suggest that PTI1-4 signals via OXI1 and MPK6 signalling cascades.

    6. You have free access to this content
      Acceleration of disulfide-coupled protein folding using glutathione derivatives (pages 1137–1144)

      Masaki Okumura, Masatoshi Saiki, Hiroshi Yamaguchi and Yuji Hidaka

      Version of Record online: 1 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08039.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Glutathione analogs, Arg-Cys-Gly and Glu-Cys-Arg, were designed to investigate the disulfide-coupled folding of proteins. Detailed folding analyses of lysozyme and prouroguanylin using the reagents indicated that a positively charged redox molecule such as Arg-Cys-Gly is preferred to accelerate disulfide-exchange reactions and that the Arg-Cys-Gly redox system is effective in mediating the formation of native disulfide bonds in proteins.

    7. You have free access to this content
      Silintaphin-1 – interaction with silicatein during structure-guiding bio-silica formation (pages 1145–1155)

      Ute Schloßmacher, Matthias Wiens, Heinz C. Schröder, Xiaohong Wang, Klaus P. Jochum and Werner E. G. Müller

      Version of Record online: 4 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08040.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Silintaphin-1, a recently discovered scaffold protein, supports biocatalytic activity and self-assembly of silicatein, an enzyme mediating biosilica deposition during siliceous sponge spicule formation. The filaments formed in vitro resemble the axial filaments found within the spicules in nature.

    8. You have free access to this content
      A novel ErbB2 epitope targeted by human antitumor immunoagents (pages 1156–1166)

      Fulvia Troise, Maria Monti, Antonello Merlino, Flora Cozzolino, Carmine Fedele, Irene Russo Krauss, Filomena Sica, Piero Pucci, Giuseppe D’Alessio and Claudia De Lorenzo

      Version of Record online: 1 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08041.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Erbicin derived immunoagents (EDIAs) are novel human, antitumor immunoconjugates selectively cytotoxic for ErbB2-positive cancer cells. Interestingly, EDIA are non-cardiotoxic and active on some Herceptin-resistant tumors. We report that EDIA bind to an epitope in the extracellular domain I of ErbB2, different from that recognised by Herceptin and other human/humanized anti-ErbB2 antibodies, which could be used as a novel therapeutic target.

    9. You have free access to this content
      Sirt1 and mir-9 expression is regulated during glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic β-islets (pages 1167–1174)

      Deepti Ramachandran, Upasana Roy, Swati Garg, Sanchari Ghosh, Sulabha Pathak and Ullas Kolthur-Seetharam

      Version of Record online: 4 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08042.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Mir-9 and the NAD-dependent protein deacetylase Sirt1 have been implicated in insulin secretion. We report that mir-9 and Sirt1 protein levels are actively regulated in vivo in β-islets during GSIS. We show that mir-9 targets and regulates Sirt1 expression. This is relevant in the pancreatic β-islets. It highlights a crosstalk between an NAD-dependent protein deacetylase and microRNA in pancreatic β-cells.

    10. You have free access to this content
      Starch-binding domains in the CBM45 family – low-affinity domains from glucan, water dikinase and α-amylase involved in plastidial starch metabolism (pages 1175–1185)

      Mikkel A. Glaring, Martin J. Baumann, Maher Abou Hachem, Hiroyuki Nakai, Natsuko Nakai, Diana Santelia, Bent W. Sigurskjold, Samuel C. Zeeman, Andreas Blennow and Birte Svensson

      Version of Record online: 1 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08043.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Isolated CBM45-type starch-binding domains from glucan, water dikinase and plastidial α-amylase were expressed as recombinant proteins and characterised. Affinities for starch and soluble cyclodextrins were measured by adsorption assays, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) analyses. The data indicate that CBM45 is a low-affinity domain and suggest potential implications for the regulation of plastidial starch metabolism.

  5. Erratum

    1. Top of page
    2. Minireview Series
    3. Minireview
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Erratum
    7. Author Index
    1. You have free access to this content
      Erratum (page 1186)

      Version of Record online: 9 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08076.x

      This article corrects:

      Structural evidence of α-aminoacylated lipoproteins of Staphylococcus aureus

      Vol. 278, Issue 5, 716–728, Version of Record online: 12 JAN 2011

  6. Author Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Minireview Series
    3. Minireview
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Erratum
    7. Author Index
    1. You have free access to this content
      Author index (page 1187)

      Version of Record online: 18 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.07843.x

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION