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FEBS Journal

Cover image for Vol. 279 Issue 2

January 2012

Volume 279, Issue 2

Pages 193–359

  1. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Original Articles
    3. Corrigendum
    4. Author index
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Inhibition mechanism of human galectin-7 by a novel galactose-benzylphosphate inhibitor (pages 193–202)

      Geoffrey Masuyer, Talat Jabeen, Christopher T. Öberg, Hakon Leffler, Ulf J. Nilsson and K. Ravi Acharya

      Article first published online: 30 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08414.x

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      Human galectin-7 (hGal-7) has been highlighted as an important marker in many types of cancer. Producing ligands able to selectively target hGal-7 will offer promising tools for deciphering cancer processes in which hGal-7 is involved, as well as present potential solutions for future therapeutics. Here we report the high resolution crystal structure of hGal-7 in complex with a synthetic 2-O-benzylphosphate-galactoside inhibitor.

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      The guanine cap of human guanylate-binding protein 1 is responsible for dimerization and self-activation of GTP hydrolysis (pages 203–210)

      Mark Wehner, Simone Kunzelmann and Christian Herrmann

      Article first published online: 30 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08415.x

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      The GTPase activity of the human guanylate binding protein 1 (hGBP1) is regulated by dimerization of the GTP binding domains. This dimerization results in a concentration-dependent self-activation of GTP turnover. In this study we identify the guanine cap as the key regulator for dimerization and an intramolecular contact between switch I and the guanine cap which transmits the nucleotide state.

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      Identification of interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 as a critical component that induces post-transcriptional activation of IκB-ζ (pages 211–222)

      Tomoyuki Ohba, Yujiro Ariga, Takashi Maruyama, Nha K. Truong, Jun-ichiro Inoue and Tatsushi Muta

      Article first published online: 30 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08416.x

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      IκB-ζ, an essential inflammatory regulator, is specifically induced by Toll-like receptor ligands or interleukin-1β by post-transcriptional activation via a 165-nucleotide element in IκB-ζ mRNA. Here, we found that while either IRAK1/4 or TRAF6 induces NF-κB activation, activation of IRAK1/4, but not that of TRAF6, are sufficient to elicit the post-transcriptional activation of IκB-ζ, suggesting a new pathway activated by IRAK1.

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      Construction and humanization of a functional bispecific EGFR × CD16 diabody using a refolding system (pages 223–233)

      Ryutaro Asano, Makoto Nakayama, Hiroko Kawaguchi, Tsuguo Kubota, Takeshi Nakanishi, Mitsuo Umetsu, Hiroki Hayashi, Yu Katayose, Michiaki Unno, Toshio Kudo and Izumi Kumagai

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08417.x

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      To restore growth inhibitory activity of a humanized bispecific EGFR × CD16 diabody (hEx16), we efficiently prepared 15 different hEx16 mutants by using a proven in vitro refolding method. Some mutants showed a recovery of binding strength to over 10 times the original strength of hEx16 and the cancer cell growth inhibition was also restored for several mutants.

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      DNA binding activity of Helicobacter pylori DnaB helicase: the role of the N-terminal domain in modulating DNA binding activities (pages 234–250)

      Ram G. Nitharwal, Vijay Verma, Naidu Subbarao, Santanu Dasgupta, Nirupam R. Choudhury and Suman K. Dhar

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08418.x

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      In this study, we have analysed the DNA binding activity of H. pylori replicative helicase, DnaB. While the C-terminal region of HpDnaB is important for its DNA binding activity, the N-terminus masks the DNA binding activity profoundly. The masking effect can be overcome either by deleting the N-terminus or by interaction with a partner like the C-terminus of DnaG primase.

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      EphrinA5 suppresses colon cancer development by negatively regulating epidermal growth factor receptor stability (pages 251–263)

      Tong-Hong Wang, Junn-Liang Chang, Jar-Yi Ho, Hsiao-Chun Wu and Tse-Ching Chen

      Article first published online: 30 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08419.x

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      We investigated the role of ephrinA5 during colon cancer progression. In colon cancer cell line models, ephrinA5 exerted an inhibitory effect on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) by promoting c-Cbl-mediated EGFR degradation and reduced colon cancer cell proliferation, migration, and chemotherapeutic resistance. Our findings identify a novel mechanism that could be utilized to improve the therapeutic efficiency of EGFR targeting strategies.

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      Filamentous actin is a substrate for protealysin, a metalloprotease of invasive Serratia proteamaculans (pages 264–274)

      Olga Tsaplina, Tatiana Efremova, Ilya Demidyuk and Sofia Khaitlina

      Article first published online: 30 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08420.x

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      Homologous bacterial metalloproteases ECP32/grimelysin from Serratia grimesii and protealysin from Serratia proteamaculans are involved in the invasion of those non-pathogenic bacteria in eukaryotic cells. Using anti-protealysin antibodies, we show that invasion of both S. proteamaculans and recombinant E. coli synthesizing protealysin is accompanied by translocation of the enzyme into 3T3-SV40 cells. Furthermore, protealysin limitedly cleaves F-actin efficiently enhancing actin dynamics.

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      Catalytically active filaments – pyruvate decarboxylase from Neurospora crassa. pH-controlled oligomer structure and catalytic function (pages 275–284)

      Stefanie Hüttl, Juliane Fiebig, Steffen Kutter, Gerd Hause, Hauke Lilie, Michael Spinka and Stephan König

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08421.x

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      Pyruvate decarboxylase species from yeasts and plant seeds studied so far are allosterically activated by their substrate pyruvate. However, detailed kinetic studies on the enzyme from Neurospora crassa demonstrate for the first time the lack of substrate activation for a yeast pyruvate decarboxylase species. The quaternary structure of this enzyme species is also peculiar as it forms filamentous structures.

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      Cu(I)- and proton-binding properties of the first N-terminal soluble domain of Bacillus subtilis CopA (pages 285–298)

      Liang Zhou, Chloe Singleton, Oliver Hecht, Geoffrey R. Moore and Nick E. Le Brun

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08422.x

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      CopA, a P-type ATPase transporter involved in copper detoxification in Bacillus subtilis, contains two soluble Atx1-like domains separated by a short linker at its N-terminus. Here, the first soluble domain in isolation, CopAa, was found to exhibit complex high affinity Cu(I)-binding behaviour involving multiple ions and protein association. These properties are distinct from those of the two domain protein CopAab.

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      Ester-linked hen egg white lysozyme shows a compact fold in a molecular dynamics simulation – possible causes and sensitivity of experimentally observable quantities to structural changes maintaining this compact fold (pages 299–315)

      Andreas P. Eichenberger, Lorna J. Smith and Wilfred F. van Gunsteren

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08424.x

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      The structure of native, partly- and fully ester-linked HEWL has been studied in a molecular dynamics simulation. The protein does not unfold upon esterification but shows a rearranged, more compact fold. The information content of NMR data appeared insufficient to detect the local conformational rearrangements, as is shown by a comparison of experimental NMR data to simulated averaged values.

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      Identification and characterization of novel spliced variants of PRMT2 in breast carcinoma (pages 316–335)

      Jing Zhong, Ren-Xian Cao, Xu-Yu Zu, Tao Hong, Jing Yang, Ling Liu, Xin-Hua Xiao, Wen-Jun Ding, Qiang Zhao, Jiang-Hua Liu and Ge-Bo Wen

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08426.x

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      Here we identified the molecular and cell biological characterization of three novel PRMT2 splice variants isolated from breast cancer cells. Coimmunoprecipitation assays in MCF7 cells and HepG2 cells, demonstrated that endogenous PRMT2 variants physically interacts with ERα/AR, respectively. Confocal microscopy suggested a colocalization of PRMT2 variants and ERα/AR in a nuclear area.

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      PP3 forms stable tetrameric structures through hydrophobic interactions via the C-terminal amphipathic helix and undergoes reversible thermal dissociation and denaturation (pages 336–347)

      Lise R. L. Pedersen, Søren B. Nielsen, Jon G. Hansted, Torben E. Petersen, Daniel E. Otzen and Esben S. Sørensen

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08428.x

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      The milk protein proteose peptone component 3 (PP3), also called lactophorin, forms stable well-defined multimeric structures. The monomers associate to tetramers through hydrophobic interactions via the hydrophobic surface of the C-terminal amphipathic α-helices. The study suggests that PP3 tetramers act as reservoirs of PP3 molecules, which in the monomeric state may stabilize the milk fat globule.

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      Identification of Tyr74 and Tyr177 as substrate oxidation sites in cationic cell wall-bound peroxidase from Populus alba L. (pages 348–357)

      Jun Shigeto, Yoshitaka Itoh, Yuji Tsutsumi and Ryuichiro Kondo

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08429.x

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      Our present study provides the direct evidence that Tyr74 and Tyr177 located on the protein surface of cationic cell-wall-bound peroxidase (CWPO-C), instead of heme pocket, have a central role in oxidation of guiacyl and syringyl compounds. This study also suggests that peroxidases, which generate tyrosine radicals on the surface, are responsible for lignifications.

  2. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Original Articles
    3. Corrigendum
    4. Author index
    1. You have free access to this content
      Corrigendum (page 358)

      Article first published online: 30 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08427.x

      This article corrects:
  3. Author index

    1. Top of page
    2. Original Articles
    3. Corrigendum
    4. Author index
    1. You have free access to this content
      Author index (page 359)

      Article first published online: 3 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2011.08322.x

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