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The FEBS Journal

Cover image for Vol. 279 Issue 8

April 2012

Volume 279, Issue 8

Pages 1355–1513

  1. Minireview Series

    1. Top of page
    2. Minireview Series
    3. Original Articles
    4. Author index
    1. You have free access to this content
      Quinolinic acid: neurotoxicity (page 1355)

      Gilles J. Guillemin

      Version of Record online: 27 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2012.08493.x

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      This minireview series reviews some of the most recent findings about quinolinic acid’s cellular toxicity and its implications in diseases such as HIV associated neurocognitive disorders, depressive disorders and schizophrenia, and finally therapeutic strategies with drugs able to interfere with quinolinic acid production and/or effects

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      Quinolinic acid, the inescapable neurotoxin (pages 1356–1365)

      Gilles J. Guillemin

      Version of Record online: 27 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2012.08485.x

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      Quinolinic acid (QUIN) is a brain endogenous excitotoxin produced by infiltrating macrophages and activated microglia during neuroinflammation. QUIN acts as a neurotoxin; gliotoxin, proinflammatory mediator, pro-oxidant molecule and can alter the integrity and cohesion of the blood–brain barrier. We review here some of the most recent findings about the effects of QUIN and its mode of action

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      The kynurenine pathway and quinolinic acid: pivotal roles in HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (pages 1366–1374)

      Apsara Kandanearatchi and Bruce J. Brew

      Version of Record online: 27 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2012.08500.x

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      This brief review will first consider HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) followed by the current understanding of its neuropathogenesis. Against this background the role of the kynurenine pathway (KP) will be detailed. Evidence both direct and indirect will be discussed for involvement of the KP at each step in the neuropathogenesis of HAND

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      Kynurenines: from the perspective of major psychiatric disorders (pages 1375–1385)

      Aye M. Myint

      Version of Record online: 27 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2012.08551.x

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      This minireview discussed the role of kynurenine pathway metabolites in major psychiatric disorders such as major depression, bipolar disorders and schizophrenia, from the aspects of interaction of kynurenines with other neurochemicals in the brain, interaction of kynurenines in the body and brain through immune activation, clinical implication of kynurenines in these disorders and future perspectives regarding therapeutics and diagnostics

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      Kynurenine pathway inhibition as a therapeutic strategy for neuroprotection (pages 1386–1397)

      Trevor W. Stone, Caroline M. Forrest and L. Gail Darlington

      Version of Record online: 27 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2012.08487.x

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      Tryptophan is oxidised along the kynurenine pathway to quinolinic acid, an agonist at N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, and kynurenic acid which is an antagonist. This minireview summarises the potential role of kynurenines in brain disorders as well as chemical strategies for drug development, some of which have been tested in animal models of infection, stroke, cerebral malaria and trypanosomiasis

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      ESCRT and calpain – old and new relationships (page 1398)

      Masatoshi Maki

      Version of Record online: 23 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2012.08561.x

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      Apparently unrelated systems often merge and work together to achieve diverse biological functions. This minireview series was aimed to unveil new facets of ESCRTs and calpains: ESCRT proteins in MVB formation, virus budding and cell division; the ambient pH sensing and adaptation in association with ESCRTs and the calpain system; evolutionary and physical linkage between calpains and PEF proteins

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      Differential requirements of mammalian ESCRTs in multivesicular body formation, virus budding and cell division (pages 1399–1406)

      Eiji Morita

      Version of Record online: 23 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2012.08534.x

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      The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs) mediate membrane fission of the bud neck in multivesicular body (MVB) vesicle formation, virus budding, and cytokinesis. Several recent studies have revealed that not all ESCRT factors are required for each biological process. This minireview summarizes our current understanding of the different requirements for ESCRT factors in three different biological processes

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      The signaling mechanism of ambient pH sensing and adaptation in yeast and fungi (pages 1407–1413)

      Tatsuya Maeda

      Version of Record online: 23 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2012.08548.x

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      The Rim101 pathway mediates ambient pH sensing and adaptation in yeast. The pathway consists of a sensing complex and a proteolytic complex, the latter of which proteolyses and thereby activates the key transcription factor Rim101. Since the proteolytic complex is formed and activated on multimerized ESCRT-III, the organization, regulation, and function of this pathway depend on the function of ESCRTs

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      Evolutionary and physical linkage between calpains and penta-EF-hand Ca2+-binding proteins (pages 1414–1421)

      Masatoshi Maki, Yuki Maemoto, Yohei Osako and Hideki Shibata

      Version of Record online: 23 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2012.08560.x

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      Phylogenetic comparison of dissected domain structures of classical and non-classical calpain subfamily members and experimentally confirmed protein–protein interaction networks infer that there is an evolutionary and physical linkage between mammalian calpains and penta-EF-hand (PEF) Ca2+-binding proteins involving the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) system

  2. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Minireview Series
    3. Original Articles
    4. Author index
    1. You have free access to this content
      Splice variants of the condensin II gene Ncaph2 include alternative reading frame translations of exon 1 (pages 1422–1432)

      Angelo Theodoratos, Laurence O. W. Wilson, Katharine M. Gosling and Aude M. Fahrer

      Version of Record online: 16 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2012.08530.x

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      Ncaph2 is a component of the condensin II complex, involved in the condensation of chromatin. Here we investigate the transcription and translation of the gene, identifying several alternative splice forms. One such form results in the first exon being translated in an alternative reading frame, producing a protein with a unique amino-terminus

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      Intrinsic DNA synthesis fidelity of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus reverse transcriptase (pages 1433–1444)

      Verónica Barrioluengo, Yi Wang, Stuart F. J. Le Grice and Luis Menéndez-Arias

      Version of Record online: 16 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2012.08532.x

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      Pre-steady-state kinetics of nucleotide incorporation and M13mp2-based forward mutation assays were used to determine the accuracy of XMRV and Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) reverse transcriptases (RTs). Both polymerases showed higher fidelity than the HIV-1BH10 RT. XMRV and MoMLV RTs showed differences in extension efficiencies for specific mispairs and in their ability to introduce frameshifts and large deletions

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      Differential IgE sensitization to cypress pollen associated to a basic allergen of 14 kDa (pages 1445–1455)

      Youcef Shahali, Jean-Pierre Sutra, Denis Charpin, Adriano Mari, Laurence Guilloux, Hélène Sénéchal and Pascal Poncet

      Version of Record online: 14 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2012.08536.x

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      The cypress pollen represents the first cause of respiratory allergies in Mediterranean basin. The aim of this study was to characterize a novel 14-kDa cypress pollen allergen (BP14). IgE reactivity to BP14 is specific to Cupressaceae and discriminates two groups of patients allergic to cypress pollen. It might correspond to a relevant marker of the cypress pollen sensitization process

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      ‘Intelligent’ ribozyme whose activity is altered in response to K+ as a result of quadruplex formation (pages 1456–1463)

      Takashi Nagata, Yu Sakurai, Yukari Hara, Tsukasa Mashima, Tsutomu Kodaki and Masato Katahira

      Version of Record online: 16 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2012.08538.x

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      The stem of a hammerhead ribozyme was replaced by r(GGAGGAGGAGGA) that changes its structure from single-stranded to compact quadruplex forms in response to K+, with some linker residues. The developed molecules switch their activity either positively or negatively in response to K+. This switching capability may have therapeutic applications because the intra- and extracellular K+ concentrations are very different

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      Interleukin-8 gene regulation in epithelial cells by Vibrio cholerae: role of multiple promoter elements, adherence and motility of bacteria and host MAPKs (pages 1464–1473)

      Madhubanti Sarkar, Swati Bhowmick, Antonella Casola and Keya Chaudhuri

      Version of Record online: 14 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2012.08539.x

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      The inflammatory cytokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) is produced by Vibrio cholerae-infected epithelial cells. Here we aim to understand transcriptional regulation of IL-8 gene expression. Maximal Vibrio cholerae-induced IL-8 gene transcription required the presence and co operation of multiple promoter elements. IL-8 expression was significantly modulated by adherence and motility of the bacteria with maximal involvement of ERK1/2 MAPK pathways

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      Orientation of the amino-terminal domain of ClpB affects the disaggregation of the protein (pages 1474–1484)

      Sayaka Mizuno, Yosuke Nakazaki, Masasuke Yoshida and Yo-hei Watanabe

      Version of Record online: 16 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2012.08540.x

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      ClpB is a ring-shaped chaperone that can reactivate protein aggregates. Structural studies have suggested that the N-terminal domain (NTD) of ClpB is highly mobile. Using inter-domain cross-linking, we investigated the effects of the restriction of conformational shift of the NTD. The results indicate that the NTD supports the substrate binding and that its conformational shift assists the disaggregation process

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      Deletion of myosin light chain kinase in endothelial cells has a minor effect on the lipopolysaccharide-induced increase in microvascular endothelium permeability in mice (pages 1485–1494)

      Yang Yu, Ning Lv, Zheng Lu, Yan-Yan Zheng, Wen-Cheng Zhang, Chen Chen, Ya-Jing Peng, Wei-Qi He, Fan-Qing Meng, Min-Sheng Zhu and Hua-Qun Chen

      Version of Record online: 16 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2012.08541.x

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      Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) was reported to play a critical role in endothelial permeability. A mouse model was generated with MLCK selectively deleted in endothelial cells. Lipopolysaccharide-induced increase in microvascular permeability was not significantly attenuated in main organs of gene knockout mice except for esophagus and eyeballs, raising a new viewpoint against the role of MLCK in endothelial cells

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      Investigation of the relationship between the structure and function of Ts2, a neurotoxin from Tityus serrulatus venom (pages 1495–1504)

      Camila T. Cologna, Steve Peigneur, Joane K. Rustiguel, M. Cristina Nonato, Jan Tytgat and Eliane C. Arantes

      Version of Record online: 4 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2012.08545.x

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      The scorpion α-toxin Ts2, previously described as β-toxin, inhibits the fast inactivation of NaV1.2, NaV1.3, NaV1.5, NaV1.6 and NaV1.7 channels but does not affect NaV1.4, NaV1.8 or DmNaV1. Interestingly, Ts2 shifts the voltage dependence of activation of NaV1.3. The three-dimensional structure of this toxin was modeled based on the high sequence identity (72%) shared with Ts1, another T. serrulatus toxin

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      Design, recombinant expression and convenient A-chain N-terminal europium-labelling of a fully active human relaxin-3 analogue (pages 1505–1512)

      Wei-Jie Zhang, Xiao Luo, Ge Song, Xin-Yi Wang, Xiao-Xia Shao and Zhan-Yun Guo

      Version of Record online: 21 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2012.08550.x

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      A fully active easily-labeled relaxin-3 analogue was designed and recombinantly prepared in the present study. The analogue can be conveniently mono-labeled by various functional probes at the A-chain N-terminus due to the presence of a single primary amine moiety. The DOTA/europium-labeled analogue represents a suitable tracer for studying interactions of the G-protein coupled receptor RXFP3 with various natural or synthetic ligands

  3. Author index

    1. Top of page
    2. Minireview Series
    3. Original Articles
    4. Author index
    1. You have free access to this content
      Author index (page 1513)

      Version of Record online: 4 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2012.08328.x

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