European Journal of Lipid Science and Technology

Cover image for Vol. 115 Issue 5

May 2013

Volume 115, Issue 5

Pages 473–590

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Commentary
    7. Review Articles
    8. Research Articles
    9. Short Communications
    10. Meeting Report
    1. You have free access to this content
      Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 5/2013

      Version of Record online: 10 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201370001

  2. Editorial board

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Commentary
    7. Review Articles
    8. Research Articles
    9. Short Communications
    10. Meeting Report
    1. You have free access to this content
      Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 5/2013

      Version of Record online: 10 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201370002

  3. In this Issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Commentary
    7. Review Articles
    8. Research Articles
    9. Short Communications
    10. Meeting Report
    1. You have free access to this content
      Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 5/2013

      Version of Record online: 10 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201370003

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Commentary
    7. Review Articles
    8. Research Articles
    9. Short Communications
    10. Meeting Report
    1. You have free access to this content
      Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 5/2013

      Version of Record online: 10 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201370004

  5. Commentary

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Commentary
    7. Review Articles
    8. Research Articles
    9. Short Communications
    10. Meeting Report
    1. You have free access to this content
      Horsemeat as a source of valuable fatty acids (pages 473–474)

      José M. Lorenzo

      Version of Record online: 10 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300137

  6. Review Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Commentary
    7. Review Articles
    8. Research Articles
    9. Short Communications
    10. Meeting Report
    1. Modulation of insulin resistance by PUFA in metabolic tissues (pages 475–482)

      Martin Kopál, Jana Muchová and Zdeňka Ďuračková

      Version of Record online: 11 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200229

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Insulin binds to receptor tyrosin kinase and activates PI-3K/Akt kinase pathway resulting in incorporation GLUT4 to cell membrane. Insulin also acts via PI-3K/Akt kinase pathway on the regulation of gene expression. The activation of SREBP-1c is mediated via PI-3K and by this way insulin regulate lipid metabolism. ACC – glycerol phosphate acyltransferase, FAS – fatty acid synthase, FOXO – forkhead box protein, PDK1–phosphatidylinositol dependent kinase1, PI-3K – phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, RTK – receptor tyrosin kinase, SCD1–stearyl-CoA desaturase-1.

  7. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Commentary
    7. Review Articles
    8. Research Articles
    9. Short Communications
    10. Meeting Report
    1. Hydroxyl-modified cationic lipids with a carbamate linkage as gene delivery vehicles (pages 483–489)

      Weihong Qiao and Min Zhou

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200265

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hydroxyl-modified cationic lipids with a carbamate linkage for delivery of DNA to the cervix cells were designed and synthesized. Lipoplexes were obtained by mixing liposomes and plasmid DNA at different mass ratios. Particle sizes and Zeta potentials were measured by Nanoparticle Size and Zeta Potential Measurement. The transfection in Hela cervical cancer cell lines was investigated through inversion fluorescence microscope. The cytotoxicity was evaluated by MTT assay.

    2. Stepwise catalytic transformations of renewable feedstock arising from plant oils (pages 490–500)

      Antoine Dupé, Virginie Le Ravalec, Cédric Fischmeister and Christian Bruneau

      Version of Record online: 1 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200364

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Diels–Alder reaction and ruthenium-catalyzed nucleophilic allylic substitution: two synthetic approaches to prepare functionalized fatty acid derivatives from biosourced dienes.

    3. Impact of endogenous canola phenolics on the oxidative stability of oil-in-water emulsions (pages 501–512)

      Ann-Dorit Moltke Sørensen, James Friel, Jill K. Winkler-Moser, Charlotte Jacobsen, Dayanidhi Huidrom, Narsi Reddy and Usha Thiyam-Holländer

      Version of Record online: 11 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200354

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      Concentration of hexanal [µg/mL] in emulsions with endogenous phenolics (350 µM) during storage [Hours]. The molecular structures of the endogenous canola phenolics are illustrated to compare structure with antioxidant efficacy. Sample codes: Sinapic acid, Sinapine, Canolol, Whole extract.

    4. Antioxidant activity of yerba mate extracts: Interactions between the individual polyphenols (pages 513–525)

      Julia Valerga, Robin Shorthose and Maria C. Lanari

      Version of Record online: 1 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200304

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Antioxidant activity of yerba mate extracts: Interactions between the individual polyphenols.

    5. Fourier transform mid-infrared spectroscopy evaluation of early stages of virgin olive oil autoxidation (pages 526–534)

      Nikolaos Nenadis, Ioannis Tsikouras, Polidoros Xenikakis and Professor Maria Z. Tsimidou

      Version of Record online: 13 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200317

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      FT-MIR/ATR discrimination of virgin olive oil early stages of oxidation.

    6. Erucic acid evaluation in rapeseed and canola oil by Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (pages 535–540)

      Syed Tufail Hussain Sherazi, Sarfraz Arain, Sarfaraz Ahmed Mahesar, Muhammad Iqbal Bhanger and Abdul Rauf Khaskheli

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200272

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A simple method for the determination of erucic acid in rapeseed and canola oil was developed. Single bounce attenuated total reflectance (SB-ATR) Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was applied without using any solvent. FTIR method was validated by cross validation and also supported by GC-MS technique.

    7. Relevance of minor components stability in commercial olive oil quality during the market period (pages 541–548)

      Giuseppe Fregapane, Aurora Gómez-Rico, Antonio M. Inarejos and M. Desamparados Salvador

      Version of Record online: 13 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200209

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The volatiles content in commercial olive oils – both at the beginning and after 1 year of market period – was significantly higher in LP-VOO (low phenolics oils) than in HP-VOO (high phenolics) and much lower in OO (olive oil). The observed relationship of a lower volatiles content in richer phenolics oils and vice versa is probably due to the olive variety – its chemical composition and enzymes activities – but also to the agronomical and technological processing conditions used.

    8. Influence of harvest year and cultivar on wax composition of olive oils (pages 549–555)

      Angelo Maria Giuffrè

      Version of Record online: 13 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200235

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Wax esters with significant differences. ANOVA experiment: cultivar, harvest year, cultivar × harvest year. Total detected wax esters (TDWEs). Total European and I.O.C. wax esters (TECWEs). **p ≤ 0.01; *p ≤ 0.05; n.s., not significant.

    9. Influence of kernel roasting on bioactive components and oxidative stability of pine nut oil (pages 556–563)

      Luyun Cai, Ailing Cao, Guzanuer Aisikaer and Tiejin Ying

      Version of Record online: 13 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200337

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Changes in bioactive components (mg/kg oil) of oils extracted fromroastedpine nut.

    10. Enzymatic hydrolysis of palm stearin to produce diacylglycerol with a highly thermostable lipase (pages 564–570)

      Yang Xu, Shaohua Guo, Weifei Wang, Yonghua Wang and Bo Yang

      Version of Record online: 11 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200373

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A highly thermostable lipase (T1 lipase), which was discovered to show 1,3-regiospecific activity toward TAGs, was firstly applied to the hydrolysis of high-melting palm stearin to produce diacylglycerol.

  8. Short Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Commentary
    7. Review Articles
    8. Research Articles
    9. Short Communications
    10. Meeting Report
    1. pH-Profiling of thermoactive lipases and esterases: Caveats and further notes (pages 571–575)

      Monica Hriscu, Laura Chiş, Monica Toşa and Professor Florin Dan Irimie

      Version of Record online: 11 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200305

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      pH profiling of a recombinant A. flavithermus esterase with the p-NP method.

    2. Evaluation of total and saturated monoglyceride content in biodiesel at low concentration (pages 576–582)

      Paolo Bondioli, Laura Della Bella and Gabriele Rivolta

      Version of Record online: 11 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200309

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The results of the analytical setup of a new method for total and saturated monoglycerides in biodiesel allow to fulfill a request coming from the automotive world for the reduction of these partial glycerides in biodiesel to be used pure or in blend with diesel fuel. The currently available methods do not have the necessary precision properties at concentrations lower than 0.3% and do not allow to separately evaluate the saturated monoglycerides content. The proposed method is based on acetylation of hydroxy groups of the sample, followed by micro column solid phase separation, isolation of polar fraction containing all acetylated glycerides and GC quantification with internal standard. By using this technique a cleaner GC path, is obtained thus allowing the identification and the quantification of peaks.

    3. Effect of talc and water addition on olive oil quality and antioxidants (pages 583–588)

      Ana I. Carrapiso, Amparo García, M. Jesús Petrón and Lourdes Martín

      Version of Record online: 7 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200252

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Effect of talc addition to Carrasqueña cv. paste on the olive oil yield, extractabiliy, oil quality phenol and tocopherol content and instrumental color. n.s.: p>0.05.

  9. Meeting Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Commentary
    7. Review Articles
    8. Research Articles
    9. Short Communications
    10. Meeting Report
    1. You have free access to this content

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