Direction-specific adaptation of motion-onset auditory evoked potentials

Authors

  • Ramona Grzeschik,

    1. Department of Ophthalmology, Visual Processing Laboratory, Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany
    2. Department of Experimental Audiology, Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany
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  • Martin Böckmann-Barthel,

    1. Department of Experimental Audiology, Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany
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  • Roland Mühler,

    1. Department of Experimental Audiology, Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany
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  • Jesko L. Verhey,

    1. Department of Experimental Audiology, Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany
    2. Center for Behavioral Brain Sciences, Magdeburg, Germany
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  • Michael B. Hoffmann

    Corresponding author
    1. Center for Behavioral Brain Sciences, Magdeburg, Germany
    • Department of Ophthalmology, Visual Processing Laboratory, Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany
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Correspondence: Michael B. Hoffmann, 1Department of Ophthalmology, as above.

E-mail: michael.hoffmann@med.ovgu.de

Abstract

Auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) to motion onset in humans are dominated by a fronto-central complex, with a change-negative deflection 1 (cN1) and a change-positive deflection 2 (cP2) component. Here the contribution of veridical motion detectors to motion-onset AEPs was investigated with the hypothesis that direction-specific adaptation effects would indicate the contribution of such motion detectors. AEPs were recorded from 33 electroencephalographic channels to the test stimulus, i.e. motion onset of horizontal virtual auditory motion (60° per s) from straight ahead to the left. AEPs were compared in two experiments for three conditions, which differed in their history prior to the motion-onset test stimulus: (i) without motion history (Baseline), (ii) with motion history in the same direction as the test stimulus (Adaptation Same), and (iii) a reference condition with auditory history. For Experiment 1, condition (iii) comprised motion in the opposite direction (Adaptation Opposite). For Experiment 2, a noise in the absence of coherent motion (Matched Noise) was used as the reference condition. In Experiment 1, the amplitude difference cP2 − cN1 obtained for Adaptation Same was significantly smaller than for Baseline and Adaptation Opposite. In Experiment 2, it was significantly smaller than for Matched Noise. Adaptation effects were absent for cN1 and cP2 latencies. These findings demonstrate direction-specific adaptation of the motion-onset AEP. This suggests that veridical auditory motion detectors contribute to the motion-onset AEP.

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