European Journal of Neuroscience

Cover image for Vol. 34 Issue 11

December 2011

Volume 34, Issue 11

Pages 1711–1885

  1. EDITORIAL

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL
    3. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    4. SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    5. NEUROSYSTEMS
    6. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    1. You have free access to this content
      EJN in the digital age: introducing the ‘EJN blog’ (page 1711)

      Jean-Marc Fritschy and Martin Sarter

      Version of Record online: 28 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07945.x

  2. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL
    3. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    4. SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    5. NEUROSYSTEMS
    6. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    1. Excitatory amino acid transporter 2 and excitatory amino acid transporter 1 negatively regulate calcium-dependent proliferation of hippocampal neural progenitor cells and are persistently upregulated after injury (pages 1712–1723)

      Jennifer A. Gilley and Steven G. Kernie

      Version of Record online: 17 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07888.x

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      Using a transgenic mouse (Mus musculus) in which nestin-expressing progenitors are labeled with enhanced green fluorescent protein, we previously characterized the expression of excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (GltI) and excitatory amino acid transporter 1 (Glast) on early neural progenitors in vivo. To address their functional role in this cell population, we manipulated their expression in P7 neurospheres isolated from the dentate gyrus.

    2. Developmental regulation of G protein-gated inwardly-rectifying K+ (GIRK/Kir3) channel subunits in the brain (pages 1724–1736)

      Laura Fernández-Alacid, Masahiko Watanabe, Elek Molnár, Kevin Wickman and Rafael Luján

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07886.x

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      G protein-gated inwardly-rectifying K+ (GIRK/family 3 of inwardly-rectifying K+) channels are coupled to neurotransmitter action and can play important roles in modulating neuronal excitability. We investigated the temporal and spatial expression of GIRK1, GIRK2 and GIRK3 subunits in the developing and adult brain of mice and rats using biochemical, immunohistochemical and immunoelectron microscopic techniques.

    3. Altered apoptotic responses in neurons lacking RhoB GTPase (pages 1737–1746)

      Sara Barberan, Kara McNair, Khalil Iqbal, Nicola C. Smith, George C. Prendergast, Trevor W. Stone, Stuart R. Cobb and Brian J. Morris

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07891.x

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      Caspase 3 activation has been linked to the acute neurotoxic effects of central nervous system damage, as in traumatic brain injury or cerebral ischaemia, and also to the early events leading to long-term neurodegeneration, as in Alzheimer’s disease. However, the precise mechanisms activating caspase 3 in neuronal injury are unclear. RhoB is a member of the Rho GTPase family that is dramatically induced by cerebral ischaemia or neurotrauma, both in preclinical models and clinically.

  3. SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL
    3. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    4. SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    5. NEUROSYSTEMS
    6. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    1. The role of cortical and hypothalamic histamine-3 receptors in the modulation of central histamine neurotransmission: an in vivo electrophysiology and microdialysis study (pages 1747–1755)

      Gunnar Flik, Eliyahu Dremencov, Thomas I. H. F. Cremers, Joost H. A. Folgering and Ben H. C. Westerink

      Version of Record online: 2 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07893.x

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      The current study aimed to investigate the effect of histamine-3 (H3) receptors, expressed in the tuberomammillary nucleus (TMN) of the hypothalamus and in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), on histamine neurotransmission in the rat brain. The firing activity of histamine neurons in the TMN was measured using in vivo extracellular single-unit electrophysiology, under propofol anesthesia.

    2. Bidirectional pattern-specific plasticity of the slow afterhyperpolarization in rats: role for high-voltage activated Ca2+ channels and Ih (pages 1756–1765)

      C. C. Kaczorowski

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07899.x

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      A burst of action potentials in hippocampal neurons is followed by a slow afterhyperpolarization (sAHP) that serves to limit subsequent firing. A reduction in the sAHP accompanies acquisition of several types of learning, whereas increases in the sAHP are correlated with cognitive impairment.

  4. NEUROSYSTEMS

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL
    3. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    4. SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    5. NEUROSYSTEMS
    6. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    1.  

      Commentary on Featured Article
      You have free access to this content
    2. Featured Article
      The integrity of cholinergic basal forebrain neurons depends on expression of Nkx2-1 (pages 1767–1782)

      Lorenza Magno, Oliver Kretz, Bettina Bert, Sara Ersözlü, Johannes Vogt, Heidrun Fink, Shioko Kimura, Angelika Vogt, Hannah Monyer, Robert Nitsch and Thomas Naumann

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07890.x

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      The transcription factor Nkx2-1 belongs to the homeobox-encoding family of proteins that have essential functions in prenatal brain development. Nkx2-1 is required for the specification of cortical interneurons and several neuronal subtypes of the ventral forebrain.

    3. Ablation of connexin30 in transgenic mice alters expression patterns of connexin26 and connexin32 in glial cells and leptomeninges (pages 1783–1793)

      B. D. Lynn, O. Tress, D. May, K. Willecke and J. I. Nagy

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07900.x

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      Expression of connexin26 (Cx26), Cx30 and Cx43 in astrocytes and expression of Cx29, Cx32 and Cx47 in oligodendrocytes of adult rodent brain has been well documented, as has the interdependence of connexin expression patterns of macroglial cells in Cx32- and Cx47-knockout mice. To investigate this interdependence further, we examined immunofluorescence labelling of glial connexins in transgenic Cx30 null mice.

    4. Glutamatergic input is selectively increased in dorsal raphe subfield 5-HT neurons: role of morphology, topography and selective innervation (pages 1794–1806)

      LaTasha K. Crawford, Caryne P. Craige and Sheryl G. Beck

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07882.x

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      Characterization of glutamatergic input to dorsal raphe (DR) serotonin (5-HT) neurons is crucial for understanding how the glutamate and 5-HT systems interact in psychiatric disorders. Markers of glutamatergic terminals, vGlut1, 2 and 3, reflect inputs from specific forebrain and midbrain regions.

    5. Artificial feeding synchronizes behavioral, hormonal, metabolic and neural parameters in mother-deprived neonatal rabbit pups (pages 1807–1816)

      Elvira Morgado, Claudia Juárez, Angel I. Melo, Belisario Domínguez, Michael N. Lehman, Carolina Escobar, Enrique Meza and Mario Caba

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07898.x

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      Nursing in the rabbit is under circadian control, and pups have a daily anticipatory behavioral arousal synchronized to this unique event, but it is not known which signal is the main entraining cue. In the present study, we hypothesized that food is the main entraining signal.

    6. Sensorimotor integration for speech motor learning involves the inferior parietal cortex (pages 1817–1822)

      Mamie Shum, Douglas M. Shiller, Shari R. Baum and Vincent L. Gracco

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07889.x

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      Sensorimotor integration is important for motor learning. The inferior parietal lobe, through its connections with the frontal lobe and cerebellum, has been associated with multisensory integration and sensorimotor adaptation for motor behaviors other than speech.

    7. Cortical activity patterns predict robust speech discrimination ability in noise (pages 1823–1838)

      Jai A. Shetake, Jordan T. Wolf, Ryan J. Cheung, Crystal T. Engineer, Satyananda K. Ram and Michael P. Kilgard

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07887.x

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      The neural mechanisms that support speech discrimination in noisy conditions are poorly understood. In quiet conditions, spike timing information appears to be used in the discrimination of speech sounds. In this study, we evaluated the hypothesis that spike timing is also used to distinguish between speech sounds in noisy conditions that significantly degrade neural responses to speech sounds.

    8. Corticomotor representation to a human forearm muscle changes following cervical spinal cord injury (pages 1839–1846)

      Patrick Freund, John Rothwell, Michael Craggs, Alan J. Thompson and Sven Bestmann

      Version of Record online: 14 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07895.x

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      Functional imaging studies, using blood oxygen level-dependent signals, have demonstrated cortical reorganization of forearm muscle maps towards the denervated leg area following spinal cord injury (SCI). The extent of cortical reorganization was predicted by spinal atrophy.

  5. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL
    3. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    4. SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    5. NEUROSYSTEMS
    6. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    1. Corticomotor excitability and plasticity following complex visuomotor training in young and old adults (pages 1847–1856)

      John Cirillo, Gabrielle Todd and John G. Semmler

      Version of Record online: 17 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07870.x

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      Previous studies with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) have shown that advancing age may influence plasticity induction in human motor cortex (M1), but these changes have been assessed with TMS-induced paradigms or simple motor tasks. The aim of this study was to examine changes in corticospinal excitability and intracortical inhibition as markers of corticomotor plasticity following complex motor training in young and old adults.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Stimulus-induced dissociation of neuronal firing rates and local field potential gamma power and its relationship to the blood oxygen level-dependent signal in macaque primary visual cortex (pages 1857–1870)

      M. J. Bartolo, M. A. Gieselmann, V. Vuksanovic, D. Hunter, L. Sun, X. Chen, L. S. Delicato and A. Thiele

      Version of Record online: 14 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07877.x

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      The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal is regularly used to assign neuronal activity to cognitive function. Recent analyses have shown that the local field potential (LFP) gamma power is a better predictor of the fMRI BOLD signal than spiking activity.

    3. Intentional signals during saccadic and reaching delays in the human posterior parietal cortex (pages 1871–1885)

      Gaspare Galati, Giorgia Committeri, Sabrina Pitzalis, Gina Pelle, Fabiana Patria, Patrizia Fattori and Claudio Galletti

      Version of Record online: 23 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07885.x

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      In the monkey posterior parietal cortex (PPC), there is clear evidence of anatomically segregated neuronal populations specialized for planning saccades and arm-reaching movements. However, functional neuroimaging studies in humans have yielded controversial results.

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