European Journal of Neuroscience

Cover image for Vol. 34 Issue 12

December 2011

Volume 34, Issue 12

Pages 1887–2066

  1. TECHNICAL SPOTLIGHT

    1. Top of page
    2. TECHNICAL SPOTLIGHT
    3. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    4. NEUROSYSTEMS
    5. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    6. CORRIGENDA
    1. Computation of measures of effect size for neuroscience data sets (pages 1887–1894)

      Harald Hentschke and Maik C. Stüttgen

      Version of Record online: 14 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07902.x

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      The overwhelming majority of research in the neurosciences employs P-values stemming from tests of statistical significance to decide on the presence or absence of an effect of some treatment variable. Although a continuous variable, the P-value is commonly used to reach a dichotomous decision about the presence of an effect around an arbitrary criterion of 0.05.

  2. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. TECHNICAL SPOTLIGHT
    3. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    4. NEUROSYSTEMS
    5. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    6. CORRIGENDA
    1. Gap junction-mediated calcium waves define communication networks among murine postnatal neural progenitor cells (pages 1895–1905)

      Benjamin Lacar, Stephanie Z. Young, Jean-Claude Platel and Angélique Bordey

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07901.x

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      In the postnatal neurogenic niche, two populations of astrocyte-like cells (B cells) persist, one acting as neural progenitor cells (NPCs, B1 cells) and one forming a structural boundary between the neurogenic niche and the striatum (B2 cells, niche astrocytes). Despite being viewed as two distinct entities, we found that B1 and B2 cells express the gap junction protein connexin 43 and display functional coupling involving 50–60 cells.

    2. The genetic signature of perineuronal oligodendrocytes reveals their unique phenotype (pages 1906–1922)

      Sara Szuchet, Joseph A. Nielsen, Gabor Lovas, Miriam S. Domowicz, Javier M. de Velasco, Dragan Maric and Lynn D. Hudson

      Version of Record online: 2 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07922.x

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      Oligodendrocytes – best known for assembling central nervous system myelin – can be categorized as precursors, myelin-forming cells and non-myelinating perineuronal cells. Perineuronal oligodendrocytes have been well characterized morphologically and ultrastructurally, but knowledge about their function remains scanty.

    3. Semaphorin 3C is not required for the establishment and target specificity of the GABAergic septohippocampal pathway in vitro (pages 1923–1933)

      Sara E. Rubio, Albert Martínez, Sophie Chauvet, Fanny Mann, Eduardo Soriano and Marta Pascual

      Version of Record online: 17 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07906.x

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      The septohippocampal (SH) pathway comprises cholinergic and GABAergic fibers. Whereas the former establish synaptic contacts with all types of hippocampal neurons, the latter form complex baskets specifically on interneurons.

  3. NEUROSYSTEMS

    1. Top of page
    2. TECHNICAL SPOTLIGHT
    3. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    4. NEUROSYSTEMS
    5. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    6. CORRIGENDA
    1. Gene expression analysis in the parvalbumin-immunoreactive PV1 nucleus of the mouse lateral hypothalamus (pages 1934–1943)

      F. Girard, Z. Meszar, C. Marti, F. P. Davis and M. Celio

      Version of Record online: 1 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07918.x

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      A solitary, elongated cluster of parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons has been previously observed in the rodent ventrolateral hypothalamus. However, the function of this so-called PV1 nucleus is unknown.

    2. Identification and characterization of an insular auditory field in mice (pages 1944–1952)

      Hiroyuki Sawatari, Yoshihide Tanaka, Makoto Takemoto, Masataka Nishimura, Kayoko Hasegawa, Kazuya Saitoh and Wen-Jie Song

      Version of Record online: 25 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07926.x

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      We used voltage-sensitive-dye-based imaging techniques to identify and characterize the insular auditory field (IAF) in mice. Previous research has identified five auditory fields in the mouse auditory cortex, including the primary field and the anterior auditory field. This study confirmed the existence of the primary field and anterior auditory field by examining the tonotopy in each field.

    3. Age-related changes in the guinea pig auditory cortex: relationship with brainstem changes and comparison with tone-induced hearing loss (pages 1953–1965)

      Boris Gourévitch and Jean-Marc Edeline

      Version of Record online: 17 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07905.x

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      Elderly people often show degraded hearing performance and have difficulties in understanding speech, particularly in noisy environments. Although loss in peripheral hearing sensitivity is an important factor in explaining these low performances, central alterations also have an impact but their exact contributions remained unclear.

    4. Neuronal activity in the superior colliculus related to saccade initiation during coordinated gaze–reach movements (pages 1966–1982)

      Vicente Reyes-Puerta, Roland Philipp, Werner Lindner and Klaus-Peter Hoffmann

      Version of Record online: 1 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07911.x

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      One must be quick and precise when foveating targets to be reached, because the eyes have to guide the hand trajectory by visual feedback, and we may miss a rapidly moving target if our grasping is not fast and accurate enough. To this end, our brains developed mechanisms coordinating gaze and hand movements to optimize the way in which we foveate and reach.

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Close temporal coupling of neuronal activity and tissue oxygen responses in rodent whisker barrel cortex (pages 1983–1996)

      Jennifer Li, Diego S. Bravo, A. Louise Upton, Gary Gilmour, Mark D. Tricklebank, Marianne Fillenz, Chris Martin, John P. Lowry, David M. Bannerman and Stephen B. McHugh

      Version of Record online: 13 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07927.x

    6. Primary food reward and reward-predictive stimuli evoke different patterns of phasic dopamine signaling throughout the striatum (pages 1997–2006)

      Holden D. Brown, James E. McCutcheon, Jackson J. Cone, Michael E. Ragozzino and Mitchell F. Roitman

      Version of Record online: 29 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07914.x

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      Phasic changes in dopamine activity play a critical role in learning and goal-directed behavior. Unpredicted reward and reward-predictive cues evoke phasic increases in the firing rate of the majority of midbrain dopamine neurons – results that predict uniformly broadcast increases in dopamine concentration throughout the striatum.

    7. Recovery of axonal myelination sheath and axonal caliber in the mouse corpus callosum following damage induced by N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate (pages 2007–2014)

      Juana Utrera, Rafael Romero, Ester Verdaguer, Fèlix Junyent and Carme Auladell

      Version of Record online: 2 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07928.x

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      Disulfiram is an aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitor used for the treatment of alcohol dependence and of cocaine addiction. It has been demonstrated that subchronic administration of disulfiram or N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDTC), the main derivative of disulfiram, to rats can produce central–peripheral distal axonopathy.

    8. HIV-1 gp120 upregulates matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors in a rat model of HIV encephalopathy (pages 2015–2023)

      Jean-Pierre Louboutin, Beverly A. S. Reyes, Lokesh Agrawal, Elisabeth J. Van Bockstaele and David S. Strayer

      Version of Record online: 17 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07908.x

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      Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are implicated in diverse processes, such as neuroinflammation, leakiness of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) and direct cellular damage in neurodegenerative and other CNS diseases. Tissue destruction by MMPs is regulated by their endogenous tissue inhibitors (TIMPs).

    9. Exposure to hypergravity during specific developmental periods differentially affects metabolism and vestibular reactions in adult C57BL /6j mice (pages 2024–2034)

      Mickael Bojados and Marc Jamon

      Version of Record online: 29 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07919.x

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      The development of the posturo-motor control of movement is conditioned by Earth’s gravity. Missing or altered gravity during the critical periods of development delays development and induces durable changes in the vestibular, cerebellar, or muscular structures, but these are not consistently mirrored at a functional level.

    10. Fatigue-induced increase in intracortical communication between mid/anterior insular and motor cortex during cycling exercise (pages 2035–2042)

      Lea Hilty, Nicolas Langer, Roberto Pascual-Marqui, Urs Boutellier and Kai Lutz

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07909.x

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      In the present study, intracortical communication between mid/anterior insular and motor cortex was investigated during a fatiguing cycling exercise. From 16 healthy male subjects performing a constant-load test at 60% peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) until volitional exhaustion, electroencephalography data were analysed during repetitive, artefact-free periods of 1-min duration.

  4. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. TECHNICAL SPOTLIGHT
    3. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    4. NEUROSYSTEMS
    5. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    6. CORRIGENDA
    1. Modulation of neuromagnetic responses to face stimuli by preceding biographical information (pages 2043–2053)

      Satoshi Tsujimoto, Takemasa Yokoyama, Yasuki Noguchi, Shinichi Kita and Ryusuke Kakigi

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07903.x

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      When we encode faces in memory, we often do so in association with biographical information regarding the person. To examine the neural dynamics underlying such encoding processes, we devised a face recognition task and recorded cortical activity using magnetoencephalography.

    2. Do brain responses to emotional images and cigarette cues differ? An fMRI study in smokers (pages 2054–2063)

      Francesco Versace, Jeffrey M. Engelmann, Edward F. Jackson, Vincent D. Costa, Jason D. Robinson, Cho Y. Lam, Jennifer A. Minnix, Victoria L. Brown, David W. Wetter and Paul M. Cinciripini

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07915.x

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      Chronic smoking is thought to cause changes in brain reward systems that result in overvaluation of cigarette-related stimuli and undervaluation of natural rewards. We tested the hypotheses that, in smokers, brain circuits involved in emotional processing: (i) would be more active during exposure to cigarette-related than neutral pictures; and (ii) would be less active to pleasant compared with cigarette-related pictures, suggesting a devaluation of intrinsically pleasant stimuli.

  5. CORRIGENDA

    1. Top of page
    2. TECHNICAL SPOTLIGHT
    3. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    4. NEUROSYSTEMS
    5. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    6. CORRIGENDA
    1. You have free access to this content
      Refinement of metre perception – training increases hierarchical metre processing (page 2064)

      Eveline Geiser, Pascale Sandmann, Lutz Jäncke and Martin Meyer

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07932.x

      This article corrects:

      Refinement of metre perception – training increases hierarchical metre processing

      Vol. 32, Issue 11, 1979–1985, Version of Record online: 3 NOV 2010

    2. You have free access to this content
      Shifting and scaling adaptation to dynamic stimuli in somatosensory cortex (pages 2065–2066)

      J. A. Garcia-Lazaro, S. S. M. Ho, A. Nair and J. W. H. Schnupp

      Version of Record online: 29 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07964.x

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