European Journal of Neuroscience

Cover image for Vol. 34 Issue 9

November 2011

Volume 34, Issue 9

Pages 1345–1511

  1. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    3. SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    4. NEUROSYSTEMS
    5. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    1. Medium spiny neurons of the neostriatal matrix exhibit specific, stereotyped changes in dendritic arborization during a critical developmental period in mice (pages 1345–1354)

      Hyunchul Lee and Atomu Sawatari

      Version of Record online: 13 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07852.x

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      In mice, the matrix compartment of the striatum (caudate/putamen) undergoes major developmental changes during the second postnatal week, including the establishment of corticostriatal and nigrostriatal afferents, the maturation of parvalbumin-positive interneurons and the appearance of perineuronal nets. It is not known if any of these events influence the dendritic structure of medium spiny neurons, the principal output cells of the striatum.

    2. Postnatal development of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA-expressing neurons in mouse neostriatum (pages 1355–1367)

      Masao Masuda, Masami Miura, Ritsuko Inoue, Michiko Imanishi, Sachiko Saino-Saito, Masahiko Takada, Kazuto Kobayashi and Toshihiko Aosaki

      Version of Record online: 17 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07873.x

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      The striatum harbors a small number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA-containing GABAergic neurons that express TH immunoreactivity after dopamine depletion, some of which reportedly resembled striatal medium spiny projection neurons (MSNs). To clarify whether the TH mRNA-expressing neurons were a subset of MSNs, we characterized their postnatal development of electrophysiological and morphological properties using a transgenic mouse strain expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under the control of the rat TH gene promoter.

  2. SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS

    1. Top of page
    2. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    3. SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    4. NEUROSYSTEMS
    5. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    1.  

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    2. Featured Article
      Loss of striatal cannabinoid CB1 receptor function in attention-deficit / hyperactivity disorder mice with point-mutation of the dopamine transporter (pages 1369–1377)

      Maura Castelli, Mauro Federici, Silvia Rossi, Valentina De Chiara, Francesco Napolitano, Valeria Studer, Caterina Motta, Lucia Sacchetti, Rosaria Romano, Alessandra Musella, Giorgio Bernardi, Alberto Siracusano, Howard H. Gu, Nicola B. Mercuri, Alessandro Usiello and Diego Centonze

      Version of Record online: 31 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07876.x

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      Abnormal dopamine (DA) transmission in the striatum plays a pivotal role in attention-deficit /hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). As striatal DA signalling modulates the endocannabinoid system (ECS), the present study was aimed at investigating cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) function in a model of ADHD obtained by triple point-mutation in the dopamine transporter (DAT) gene in mice, making them insensitive to cocaine [DAT cocaine-insensitive (DAT-CI) mice].

    3. Opposite function of dopamine D1 and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in striatal cannabinoid-mediated signaling (pages 1378–1389)

      Tanya L. Daigle, William C. Wetsel and Marc G. Caron

      Version of Record online: 31 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07874.x

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      It is well established that the cannabinoid and dopamine systems interact at various levels to regulate basal ganglia function. Although it is well known that acute administration of cannabinoids to mice can modify dopamine-dependent behaviors, the intraneuronal signaling pathways employed by these agents in the striatum are not well understood.

  3. NEUROSYSTEMS

    1. Top of page
    2. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    3. SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    4. NEUROSYSTEMS
    5. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    1. A simple method for characterizing passive and active neuronal properties: application to striatal neurons (pages 1390–1405)

      Nathan F. Lepora, Craig P. Blomeley, Darren Hoyland, Enrico Bracci, Paul G. Overton and Kevin Gurney

      Version of Record online: 31 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07879.x

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      The study of active and passive neuronal dynamics usually relies on a sophisticated array of electrophysiological, staining and pharmacological techniques. We describe here a simple complementary method that recovers many findings of these more complex methods but relies only on a basic patch-clamp recording approach.

    2. The influence of orexins on the firing rate and pattern of rat intergeniculate leaflet neurons – electrophysiological and immunohistological studies (pages 1406–1418)

      Dobromila Pekala, Tomasz Blasiak, Morten Raastad and Marian H. Lewandowski

      Version of Record online: 31 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07868.x

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      Orexins influence various physiological processes associated with feeding behaviour, endocrine functions and wakefulness. One component of mammalian circadian timing systems, intergeniculate leaflet (IGL) of the lateral geniculate nucleus, is thought to contribute to circadian entrainment by processing photic and non-photic/arousal-related signals.

    3. Carbonic anhydrase-related protein VIII is expressed in rod bipolar cells and alters signaling at the rod bipolar to AII-amacrine cell synapse in the mammalian retina (pages 1419–1431)

      T. Puthussery, J. Gayet-Primo and W. R. Taylor

      Version of Record online: 17 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07861.x

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      Mutation of the gene encoding carbonic anhydrase-related protein VIII (CAVIII) results in motor coordination deficits in mice and humans, due to loss of this protein in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. Recent studies have indicated that the CAVIII gene, Car8, is also expressed in rod bipolar cells (RBCs), a critical glutamatergic neuron for scotopic vision.

    4. Pyruvate’s blood glutamate scavenging activity contributes to the spectrum of its neuroprotective mechanisms in a rat model of stroke (pages 1432–1441)

      Matthew Boyko, Alexander Zlotnik, Benjamin F. Gruenbaum, Shaun E. Gruenbaum, Sharon Ohayon, Ruslan Kuts, Israel Melamed, Adi Regev, Yoram Shapira and Vivian I. Teichberg

      Version of Record online: 21 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07864.x

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      In previous studies, we have shown that by increasing the brain-to-blood glutamate efflux upon scavenging blood glutamate with either oxaloacetate or pyruvate, one achieves highly significant neuroprotection particularly in the context of traumatic brain injury. The current study examines, for the first time, how the blood glutamate scavenging properties of glutamate–pyruvate transaminase (GPT), alone or in combination with pyruvate, may contribute to the spectrum of its neuroprotective mechanisms and improve the outcome of rats exposed to brain ischemia, as they do after head trauma.

    5. Social defeat stress induces hyperthermia through activation of thermoregulatory sympathetic premotor neurons in the medullary raphe region (pages 1442–1452)

      Battuvshin Lkhagvasuren, Yoshiko Nakamura, Takakazu Oka, Nobuyuki Sudo and Kazuhiro Nakamura

      Version of Record online: 6 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07863.x

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      Psychological stress-induced hyperthermia is a fundamental autonomic response in mammals. However, the central circuitry underlying this stress response is poorly understood.

    6. Differential contributions of rostral and caudal frontal forelimb areas to compensatory process after neonatal hemidecortication in rats (pages 1453–1460)

      Tatsuya Umeda and Tadashi Isa

      Version of Record online: 31 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07866.x

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      Following brain damage, especially in juvenile animals, large-scale reorganization is known to occur in the remaining brain structures to compensate for functional deficits. In rats with neonatal hemidecortication, corticospinal fibers originating from the undamaged side of the sensorimotor cortex issue collateral sprouts to the ipsilateral spinal gray matter that mediate cortical excitation to ipsilateral forelimb motoneurons and compensate for the deficit in forelimb movements.

    7. Cutaneous afferent input does not modulate motor intracortical inhibition in ageing men (pages 1461–1469)

      Ashleigh E. Smith, Michael C. Ridding, Ryan D. Higgins, Gary A. Wittert and Julia B. Pitcher

      Version of Record online: 31 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07869.x

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      Afferent input has been shown to be a powerful modulator of cortical inhibition. Such modulation is likely to be important for the control of ongoing movement, but may also play a role in facilitating neuroplastic reorganisation.

    8. Subthalamo-pallidal interactions underlying parkinsonian neuronal oscillations in the primate basal ganglia (pages 1470–1484)

      Yoshihisa Tachibana, Hirokazu Iwamuro, Hitoshi Kita, Masahiko Takada and Atsushi Nambu

      Version of Record online: 31 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07865.x

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      Parkinson’s disease is characterized by degeneration of nigral dopaminergic neurons, leading to a wide variety of psychomotor dysfunctions. Accumulated evidence suggests that abnormally synchronized oscillations in the basal ganglia contribute to the expression of parkinsonian motor symptoms.

  4. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    3. SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    4. NEUROSYSTEMS
    5. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    1. Anticipation of meals during restricted feeding increases activity in the hypothalamus in rats (pages 1485–1491)

      Linda A. W. Verhagen, Mieneke C. M. Luijendijk, Jan-Willem de Groot, Linda P. G. van Dommelen, Anne G. Klimstra, Roger A. H. Adan and Tom A. P. Roeling

      Version of Record online: 31 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07880.x

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      Rats exposed to timed restricted meals develop anticipation of food. They increase their activity levels in the hours preceding food access; this has been described as food-anticipatory activity (FAA).

    2. Effects of Bax gene deletion on social behaviors and neural response to olfactory cues in mice (pages 1492–1499)

      Melissa M. Holmes, Lee Niel, Jeff J. Anyan, Andrew T. Griffith, D. Ashley Monks and Nancy G. Forger

      Version of Record online: 31 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07881.x

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      Bax is a pro-death protein that plays a crucial role in developmental neuronal cell death. Bax−/− mice exhibit increased neuron number and lack several neural sex differences. Here we examined the effects of Bax gene deletion on social behaviors (olfactory preference, social recognition, social approach, and aggression) and the neural processing of olfactory cues.

    3. Flavour exposures after conditioned aversion or preference trigger different brain processes in anaesthetised pigs (pages 1500–1511)

      A. Gaultier, M. C. Meunier-Salaün, C. H. Malbert and D. Val-Laillet

      Version of Record online: 17 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07848.x

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      We describe the behavioural consequences of conditioned flavour aversion and preference in pigs and have investigated the brain circuits involved in the representation of flavours with different hedonic values. The study was performed on eight 30-kg pigs.

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