European Journal of Neuroscience

Cover image for Vol. 35 Issue 1

January 2012

Volume 35, Issue 1

Pages 1–165

  1. REVIEW

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW
    3. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    4. SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    5. NEUROSYSTEMS
    6. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    1. How many neurons do you have? Some dogmas of quantitative neuroscience under revision (pages 1–9)

      Roberto Lent, Frederico A. C. Azevedo, Carlos H. Andrade-Moraes and Ana V. O. Pinto

      Version of Record online: 13 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07923.x

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      Owing to methodological shortcomings and a certain conservatism that consolidates wrong assumptions in the literature, some dogmas have become established and reproduced in papers and textbooks, derived from quantitative features of the brain. The first dogma states that the cerebral cortex is the pinnacle of brain evolution – based on the observations that its volume is greater in more ‘intelligent’ species, and that cortical surface area grows more than any other brain region, to reach the largest proportion in higher primates and humans.

  2. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW
    3. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    4. SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    5. NEUROSYSTEMS
    6. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    1. Fluoxetine rescues impaired hippocampal neurogenesis in a transgenic A53T synuclein mouse model (pages 10–19)

      Zacharias Kohl, Beate Winner, Kiren Ubhi, Edward Rockenstein, Michael Mante, Martina Münch, Carolee Barlow, Todd Carter, Eliezer Masliah and Jürgen Winkler

      Version of Record online: 2 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07933.x

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      The accumulation of alpha-synuclein in Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites of different neuronal populations is one of the neuropathological hallmarks in Parkinson disease (PD). Overexpression of human wildtype or mutant alpha-synuclein affects the generation of new neurons in the adult dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus in models of PD.

    2. P/Q-type and T-type calcium channels, but not type 3 transient receptor potential cation channels, are involved in inhibition of dendritic growth after chronic metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1 and protein kinase C activation in cerebellar Purkinje cells (pages 20–33)

      Olivia S. Gugger, Jana Hartmann, Lutz Birnbaumer and Josef P. Kapfhammer

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07942.x

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      The development of a neuronal dendritic tree is modulated both by signals from afferent fibers and by an intrinsic program. We have previously shown that chronic activation of either type 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1s) or protein kinase C (PKC) in organotypic cerebellar slice cultures of mice and rats severely inhibits the growth and development of the Purkinje cell dendritic tree.

    3. Profound defects in pupillary responses to light in TRPM-channel null mice: a role for TRPM channels in non-image-forming photoreception (pages 34–43)

      Steven Hughes, Carina A. Pothecary, Aarti Jagannath, Russell G. Foster, Mark W. Hankins and Stuart N. Peirson

      Version of Record online: 2 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07944.x

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      TRPM1 is a spontaneously active non-selective cation channel that has recently been shown to play an important role in the depolarizing light responses of ON bipolar cells. Consistent with this role, mutations in the TRPM1 gene have been identified as a principal cause of congenital stationary night blindness.

    4. Parallel development of orientation maps and spatial frequency selectivity in cat visual cortex (pages 44–55)

      Toshiki Tani, Jérôme Ribot, Kazunori O’Hashi and Shigeru Tanaka

      Version of Record online: 2 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07954.x

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      In an early stage of the postnatal development of cats, orientation maps mature and spatial frequency selectivity is consolidated. To investigate the time course of orientation map maturation associated with the consolidation of spatial frequency selectivity, we performed optical imaging of intrinsic signals in areas 17 and 18 of cats under the stimulation of drifting square-wave gratings with different orientations and spatial frequencies.

  3. SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW
    3. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    4. SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    5. NEUROSYSTEMS
    6. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    1. Functional evidence for D-serine inhibition of non-N-methyl-D-aspartate ionotropic glutamate receptors in retinal neurons (pages 56–65)

      Bryan A. Daniels, Leah Wood, François Tremblay and William H. Baldridge

      Version of Record online: 1 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07925.x

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      D-Serine is an important signaling molecule throughout the central nervous system, acting as an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor coagonist. This study investigated the D-serine modulation of non-N-methyl-D-aspartate ionotropic glutamate receptors expressed by inner retinal neurons.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Unique somato-dendritic distribution pattern of Kv4.2 channels on hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells (pages 66–75)

      Katalin Kerti, Andrea Lorincz and Zoltan Nusser

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07907.x

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      A-type K+ current (IA) plays a critical role in controlling the excitability of pyramidal cell (PC) dendrites. In vitro dendritic patch-pipette recordings have demonstrated a prominent, sixfold increase in IA density along the main apical dendrites of rat hippocampal CA1 PCs.

    3. Mixed electrical–chemical transmission between hippocampal mossy fibers and pyramidal cells (pages 76–82)

      Carmen Vivar, Roger D. Traub and Rafael Gutiérrez

      Version of Record online: 13 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07930.x

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      Morphological and electrophysiological studies have shown that granule cell axons, the mossy fibers (MFs), establish gap junctions and therefore electrical communication among them. That granule cells express gap junctional proteins in their axons suggests the possibility that their terminals also express them.

  4. NEUROSYSTEMS

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW
    3. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    4. SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    5. NEUROSYSTEMS
    6. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    1.  

      Commentary on Featured Article
      You have free access to this content
      Dissecting the projections of different groups of raphe serotonergic neurons (Commentary on Bang et al.) (pages 83–84)

      Ali Jahanshahi, Yasin Temel and Harry W. M. Steinbusch

      Version of Record online: 2 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07983.x

    2. FEATURED ARTICLE
      Projections and interconnections of genetically defined serotonin neurons in mice (pages 85–96)

      Sun Jung Bang, Patricia Jensen, Susan M. Dymecki and Kathryn G. Commons

      Version of Record online: 13 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07936.x

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      Brain serotonin neurons are heterogeneous and can be distinguished by several anatomical and physiological characteristics. Toward resolving this heterogeneity into classes of functional relevance, subtypes of mature serotonin neurons were previously identified based on gene expression differences initiated during development in different rhombomeric (r) segments of the hindbrain.

    3. Electrophysiological responses of rat olfactory tubercle neurons to biologically relevant odours (pages 97–105)

      Olivier Rampin, Camille Bellier and Yves Maurin

      Version of Record online: 25 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07940.x

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      Biologically relevant odours were used to stimulate olfactory tubercle neurons in anaesthetized male rats. Among 120 recorded neurons, 118 showed spontaneous activity (mean firing rate, 15.0 ± 1.4 spikes/s).

    4. Interference in dichotic listening: the effect of contralateral noise on oscillatory brain networks (pages 106–118)

      Bernhard Ross, Takahiro Miyazaki and Takako Fujioka

      Version of Record online: 15 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07935.x

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      Coupling of thalamocortical networks through synchronous oscillations at gamma frequencies (30–80 Hz) has been suggested as a mechanism for binding of auditory sensory information into an object representation, which then becomes accessible for perception and cognition. This study investigated whether contralateral noise interferes with this step of central auditory processing.

    5. You have free access to this content
      Transcranial direct current stimulation preconditioning modulates the effect of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in the human motor cortex (pages 119–124)

      Giuseppe Cosentino, Brigida Fierro, Piera Paladino, Simona Talamanca, Simone Vigneri, Antonio Palermo, Giuseppe Giglia and Filippo Brighina

      Version of Record online: 2 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07939.x

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      Experimental studies emphasize the importance of homeostatic plasticity as a mean of stabilizing the properties of neural circuits. In the present work we combined two techniques able to produce short-term (5-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, rTMS) and long-term (transcranial direct current stimulation, tDCS) effects on corticospinal excitability to evaluate whether and how the effects of 5-Hz rTMS can be tuned by tDCS preconditioning.

    6. You have free access to this content
      The application of spaced theta burst protocols induces long-lasting neuroplastic changes in the human motor cortex (pages 125–134)

      Mitchell R. Goldsworthy, Julia B. Pitcher and Michael C. Ridding

      Version of Record online: 25 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07924.x

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      There is some limited evidence suggesting that the spaced application of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) protocols may extend the duration of induced neuroplastic changes. However, this has yet to be demonstrated in the human primary motor cortex (M1).

  5. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW
    3. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    4. SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    5. NEUROSYSTEMS
    6. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    1. Early postnatal stress alters extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling in the corticolimbic system modulating emotional circuitry in adult rats (pages 135–145)

      Shuhei Ishikawa, Yasuhiro Saito, Yoshiki Yanagawa, Satoru Otani, Sachiko Hiraide, Kei-ichi Shimamura, Machiko Matsumoto and Hiroko Togashi

      Version of Record online: 15 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07921.x

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      The present study elucidated whether early life stress alters the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway that underlies fear retrieval and fear extinction based on a contextual fear conditioning paradigm, using a juvenile stress model. Levels of phospho-ERK (pERK), the active form of ERK, increased after fear retrieval in the hippocampal CA1 region but not in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC).

    2. Dopaminergic enhancement of local food-seeking is under global homeostatic control (pages 146–159)

      Jeff A. Beeler, Cristianne R. M. Frazier and Xiaoxi Zhuang

      Version of Record online: 27 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07916.x

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      Recent work has implicated dopaminergic mechanisms in overeating and obesity with some researchers suggesting parallels between the dopamine dysregulation associated with addiction and an analogous dysregulation in obesity. The precise role of dopamine in mediating reward and reinforcement, however, remains controversial.

    3. Activation of the medial prefrontal cortex by escapable stress is necessary for protection against subsequent inescapable stress-induced potentiation of morphine conditioned place preference (pages 160–165)

      Robert R. Rozeske, Andre Der-Avakian, Linda R. Watkins and Steven F. Maier

      Version of Record online: 25 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07929.x

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      Stress can be a predisposing factor in the development of psychiatric disorders. However, not all individuals develop psychiatric disorders following a traumatic event. An attempt to understand these individual differences has led to a focus on factors that produce resistance.

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