European Journal of Neuroscience

Cover image for Vol. 35 Issue 10

Special Issue: Special Feature: Development And Plasticity Of Thalamocortical Systems

May 2012

Volume 35, Issue 10

Pages 1522–1654

  1. DEVELOPMENT AND PLASTICITY OF THALAMOCORTICAL SYSTEMS

    1. Top of page
    2. DEVELOPMENT AND PLASTICITY OF THALAMOCORTICAL SYSTEMS
    3. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    1. EDITORIAL

      Development and plasticity of thalamocortical systems (pages 1522–1523)

      Denis Jabaudon and Guillermina López Bendito

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08117.x

    2. Unveiling the diversity of thalamocortical neuron subtypes (pages 1524–1532)

      Francisco Clascá, Pablo Rubio-Garrido and Denis Jabaudon

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08033.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Our current understanding of thalamocortical (TC) circuits is largely based on studies investigating so-called ‘specific’ thalamic nuclei, which receive and transmit sensory-triggered input to specific cortical target areas. TC neurons in these nuclei have a striking point-to-point topography and a stereotyped laminar pattern of termination in the cortex, which has made them ideal models to study the organization, plasticity, and development of TC circuits.

    3. Patterning of pre-thalamic somatosensory pathways (pages 1533–1539)

      Gabrielle Pouchelon, Laura Frangeul, Filippo M. Rijli and Denis Jabaudon

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08059.x

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      The topographical mapping of input is a fundamental organizing principle of sensory pathways. In the somatosensory system, a precise topographical representation of the face is first generated in the brainstem and then faithfully replicated in the thalamus and cortex.

    4. Development and critical period plasticity of the barrel cortex (pages 1540–1553)

      Reha S. Erzurumlu and Patricia Gaspar

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08075.x

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      Schematic diagram illustrating the classical structural plasticity in the barrel cortex following row C whisker lesions or infraorbital nerve transection. These effects are only seen when peripheral lesions are performed up to postnatal day 3. The patterns and deficits are routinely assessed by histochemical stains such as succinic dehydrogenase or cytochrome oxidase histochemistry or with immunohistochemistry for TCA markers such as 5-HTT or vesicular glutamate transporter 2 or by Nissl or Golgi stains for neuronal and dendritic organization.

    5. Diversity of thalamic progenitor cells and postmitotic neurons (pages 1554–1562)

      Yasushi Nakagawa and Tomomi Shimogori

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08089.x

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      The vertebrate thalamus contains multiple sensory nuclei, and relays sensory information to corresponding cortical areas. Moreover, the thalamus actively regulates information transmission to the cortex by modulating the response magnitude, firing mode and synchrony of neurons according to behavioral demands.

    6. Insights into the complex influence of 5-HT signaling on thalamocortical axonal system development (pages 1563–1572)

      Esmee S. B. van Kleef, Patricia Gaspar and Alexandre Bonnin

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.8096.x

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      The topographic organization of the thalamocortical axons (TCAs) in the barrel field (BF) in the rodent primary somatosensory cortex results from a succession of temporally and spatially precise developmental events. Prenatally, growth and guidance mechanisms enable TCAs to navigate through the forebrain and reach the cortex.

    7. Mechanisms controlling the guidance of thalamocortical axons through the embryonic forebrain (pages 1573–1585)

      Zoltán Molnár, Sonia Garel, Guillermina López-Bendito, Patricia Maness and David J. Price

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08119.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Thalamocortical axons must cross a complex cellular terrain through the developing forebrain and this terrain has to be understood for us to learn how thalamocortical axons reach their destinations. Selective fasciculation, guidepost cells, various diencephalic and telencephalic gradients have been implicated in thalamocortical guidance.

    8. Termination and initial branch formation of SNAP-25-deficient thalamocortical fibres in heterochronic organotypic co-cultures (pages 1586–1594)

      Daniel Blakey, Michael C. Wilson and Zoltán Molnár

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08120.x

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      We are interested in the role of neural activity mediated through regulated vesicular release in the stopping and early branching of the thalamic projections in the cortex. Axon outgrowth, arrival at the cortical subplate, side-branch formation during the waiting period and cortical plate innervation of embryonic thalamocortical projections occurs without major abnormalities in the absence of regulated release in Snap25/ mice [Washbourne et al. (2002)]We are interested in the role of neural activity mediated through regulated vesicular release in the stopping and early branching of the thalamic projections in the cortex. Axon outgrowth, arrival at the cortical subplate, side-branch formation during the waiting period and cortical plate innervation of embryonic thalamocortical projections occurs without major abnormalities in the absence of regulated release in Snap25/ mice [Washbourne et al. (2002)]

    9. Shaping brain connections through spontaneous neural activity (pages 1595–1604)

      Nobuhiko Yamamoto and Guillermina López-Bendito

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08101.x

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      An overwhelming number of observations demonstrate that neural activity and genetic programs interact to specify the composition and organization of neural circuits during all stages of development. Spontaneous neuronal activities have been documented in several developing neural regions in both invertebrates and vertebrates, and their roles are mostly conserved among species.

  2. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. DEVELOPMENT AND PLASTICITY OF THALAMOCORTICAL SYSTEMS
    3. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    1. Pre- and postnatal exposure to kynurenine causes cognitive deficits in adulthood (pages 1605–1612)

      Ana Pocivavsek, Hui-Qiu Wu, Greg I. Elmer, John P. Bruno and Robert Schwarcz

      Article first published online: 19 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08064.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Levels of kynurenic acid (KYNA), an endogenous product of tryptophan degradation, are elevated in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid of individuals with schizophrenia (SZ). This increase has been implicated in the cognitive dysfunctions seen in the disease since KYNA is an antagonist of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and the NMDA receptor, both of which are critically involved in cognitive processes and in a defining neurodevelopmental period in the pathophysiology of SZ.

    2. Obstacle avoidance locomotor tasks: adaptation, memory and skill transfer (pages 1613–1621)

      Evelyne Kloter and Volker Dietz

      Article first published online: 16 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08066.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The aim of this study was to explore the neural basis of adaptation, memory and skill transfer during human stepping over obstacles. Whilst walking on a treadmill, subjects had to perform uni- and bilateral obstacle steps.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Pathway-specific plasticity in the human spinal cord (pages 1622–1629)

      Christian Leukel, Wolfgang Taube, Sandra Beck and Martin Schubert

      Article first published online: 4 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08067.x

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      The aim of the present study was to artificially induce plasticity in the human spinal cord and evaluate whether this plasticity is pathway specific. For this purpose, a technique called paired associative stimulation (PAS) was applied.

    4. Short-term crossmodal plasticity of the auditory steady-state response in blindfolded sighted individuals (pages 1630–1636)

      Latifa Lazzouni, Patrice Voss and Franco Lepore

      Article first published online: 18 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08088.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This study investigated the effect of short-term visual deprivation on auditory steady-state response (ASSR) to amplitude-modulated tones. Magnetoencephalography data were acquired while subjects performed an auditory detection task under both monaural and dichotic presentation conditions.

    5. You have free access to this content
      Negative emotion can enhance human motor cortical plasticity (pages 1637–1645)

      Satoko Koganemaru, Kazuhisa Domen, Hidenao Fukuyama and Tatsuya Mima

      Article first published online: 24 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08098.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The iTBS intervention was combined with 20 IAPS images that belonged to the same emotional category (negative, neutral, or positive). A 2-s train of iTBS started 2 s after the beginning of each image presentation.

    6. Action anticipation beyond the action observation network: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study in expert basketball players (pages 1646–1654)

      A. M. Abreu, E. Macaluso, R. T. Azevedo, P. Cesari, C. Urgesi and S. M. Aglioti

      Article first published online: 29 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08104.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The ability to predict the actions of others is quintessential for effective social interactions, particularly in competitive contexts (e.g. in sport) when knowledge about upcoming movements allows anticipating rather than reacting to opponents. Studies suggest that we predict what others are doing by using our own motor system as an internal forward model and that the fronto-parietal action observation network (AON) is fundamental for this ability.

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