European Journal of Neuroscience

Cover image for Vol. 35 Issue 11

June 2012

Volume 35, Issue 11

Pages 1655–1809

  1. REVIEW

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW
    3. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    4. NEUROSYSTEMS
    5. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    1. Migratory pathways of GABAergic interneurons when they enter the neocortex (pages 1655–1660)

      Daisuke H. Tanaka and Kazunori Nakajima

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08111.x

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      During rodent development, most neocortical interneurons are generated in the subpallium and migrate tangentially toward the neocortex. Because of recent discoveries regarding the novel origins and migratory pathways of neocortical interneurons, in this article we review the literature on the migratory pathways of interneurons when they enter the neocortex.

  2. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW
    3. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    4. NEUROSYSTEMS
    5. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    1. Subtype-dependent postnatal development of taste receptor cells in mouse fungiform taste buds (pages 1661–1671)

      Yoshitaka Ohtubo, Masafumi Iwamoto and Kiyonori Yoshii

      Article first published online: 30 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08068.x

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      Taste buds contain two types of taste receptor cells, inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor type 3-immunoreactive cells (type II cells) and synaptosomal-associating protein-25-immunoreactive cells (type III cells). We investigated their postnatal development in mouse fungiform taste buds immunohistochemically and electrophysiologically.

    2. Ampakine CX546 increases proliferation and neuronal differentiation in subventricular zone stem/progenitor cell cultures (pages 1672–1683)

      Clarissa Schitine, Sara Xapelli, Fabienne Agasse, Laura Sardà-Arroyo, Ana P. Silva, Ricardo A. De Melo Reis, Fernando G. de Mello and João O. Malva

      Article first published online: 16 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08072.x

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      Ampakines are chemical compounds known to modulate the properties of ionotropic α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA)-subtype glutamate receptors. The functional effects attributed to ampakines involve plasticity and the increase in synaptic efficiency of neuronal circuits, a process that may be intimately associated with differentiation of newborn neurons.

    3. Mushroom body neuronal remodelling is necessary for short-term but not for long-term courtship memory in Drosophila (pages 1684–1691)

      Christelle Redt-Clouet, Séverine Trannoy, Ana Boulanger, Elena Tokmatcheva, Elena Savvateeva-Popova, Marie-Laure Parmentier, Thomas Preat and Jean-Maurice Dura

      Article first published online: 9 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08103.x

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      The remodelling of neurons during their development is considered necessary for their normal function. One fundamental mechanism involved in this remodelling process in both vertebrates and invertebrates is axon pruning.

    4. Computational molecular phenotyping of retinal sheet transplants to rats with retinal degeneration (pages 1692–1704)

      M. J. Seiler, B. W. Jones, R. B. Aramant, P. B. Yang, H. S. Keirstead and R. E. Marc

      Article first published online: 17 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08078.x

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      Computational molecular phenotyping (CMP) was used to identify cells involved in the functional connections between retinal sheet transplants and degenerate rat retinas. Outer segments of transplant rods and cones were immunoreactive for opsin but nothing was seen in the host retina. Neuropil mingling occurred with absent glial barriers. CMP data indicate that horizontal cells and amacrine cells are involved in a novel circuit between transplant and host.

    5. Microtubule stabilization by peloruside A and paclitaxel rescues degenerating neurons from okadaic acid-induced tau phosphorylation (pages 1705–1717)

      Viswanath Das and John H. Miller

      Article first published online: 17 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08084.x

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      Many cellular organelles must travel long distances in neurons to perform their specific functions, and this transport is highly dependent on the microtubule network within the axon. Hyperphosphorylation of microtubule-associated tau protein destabilizes microtubules and leads to neuronal cell death.

  3. NEUROSYSTEMS

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW
    3. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    4. NEUROSYSTEMS
    5. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    1. γ-Aminobutyric acid receptor A-mediated inhibition in the honeybee’s antennal lobe is necessary for the formation of configural olfactory percepts (pages 1718–1724)

      Amir F. Choudhary, Ian Laycock and Geraldine A. Wright

      Article first published online: 20 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08090.x

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      Complex odours often possess perceptual qualities that are distinct from their components. Here, we show that GABA-A mediated inhibition is responsible for the formation of the unique perceptual properties of olfactory mixtures.

    2. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR5) activate transient receptor potential canonical channels to improve the regularity of the respiratory rhythm generated by the pre-Bötzinger complex in mice (pages 1725–1737)

      Faiza Ben-Mabrouk, Louella B. Amos and Andrew K. Tryba

      Article first published online: 22 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08091.x

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      Group I, mGluRs are proposed to play a major role in generating the breathing rhythm. Here our data suggests that mGluR5 signaling activates transient receptor protein canonical (TRPC) channels to reduce variability in cycle-by-cycle respiratory rhythm generation.

    3. Linking visual response properties in the superior colliculus to saccade behavior (pages 1738–1752)

      Robert A. Marino, Ron Levy, Susan Boehnke, Brian J. White, Laurent Itti and Douglas P. Munoz

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08079.x

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      Here we examined the influence of the visual response in the superior colliculus (SC) (an oculomotor control structure integrating sensory, motor and cognitive signals) on the development of the motor command that drives saccadic eye movements in monkeys. We varied stimulus luminance to alter the timing and magnitude of visual responses in the SC and examined how these changes correlated with resulting saccade behavior.

    4. Enhancement of neural representation capacity by modular architecture in networks of cortical neurons (pages 1753–1760)

      Ofri Levy, Noam E. Ziv and Shimon Marom

      Article first published online: 16 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08094.x

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      Biological networks are ubiquitously modular, a feature believed to be essential for the enhancement of their functional capacities. Here we have used a simple modular in vitro design to examine the possibility that modularity enhances network functionality in the context of input representation.

  4. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW
    3. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    4. NEUROSYSTEMS
    5. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    1.  

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    2. Featured Article
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      Novel biochemical manipulation of brain serotonin reveals a role of serotonin in the circadian rhythm of sleep–wake cycles (pages 1762–1770)

      Eiko Nakamaru-Ogiso, Hiroyuki Miyamoto, Kozo Hamada, Koji Tsukada and Katsuji Takai

      Article first published online: 24 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08077.x

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      Serotonin (5-HT) neurons have been implicated in the modulation of many physiological functions, including mood regulation, feeding, and sleep. Impaired or altered 5-HT neurotransmission appears to be involved in depression and anxiety symptoms, as well as in sleep disorders.

    3. Striatal dopamine modulates song spectral but not temporal features through D1 receptors (pages 1771–1781)

      Arthur Leblois and David J Perkel

      Article first published online: 17 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08095.x

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      The activity of midbrain dopaminergic neurons and their projection to the basal ganglia (BG) are thought to play a critical role in the acquisition of motor skills through reinforcement learning, as well as in the expression of learned motor behaviors. The precise role of BG dopamine (DA) in mediating and modulating motor performance and learning, however, remains unclear.

    4. Touching and feeling: differences in pleasant touch processing between glabrous and hairy skin in humans (pages 1782–1788)

      F. McGlone, H. Olausson, J. A. Boyle, M. Jones-Gotman, C. Dancer, S. Guest and G. Essick

      Article first published online: 17 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08092.x

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      Previous fMRI studies in two rare patients, together with microneurography and psychophysical observations in healthy subjects, have demonstrated a system of mechanosensitive C-tactile afferents (CT) sensitive to slowly moving stimuli. They project to posterior insular cortex and signal pleasant aspects of touch.

    5. 5′-Ectonucleotidase-knockout mice lack non-REM sleep responses to sleep deprivation (pages 1789–1798)

      Mark R. Zielinski, Ping Taishi, James M. Clinton and James M. Krueger

      Article first published online: 29 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08112.x

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      Adenosine and extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) have multiple physiological central nervous system (CNS) actions including regulation of cerebral blood flow, inflammation, and sleep. However, their exact sleep regulatory mechanisms remain unknown.

    6. Differential involvement of the basolateral amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex in the formation of sensory-specific associations in conditioned flavor preference and magazine approach paradigms (pages 1799–1809)

      Janina Scarlet, Andrew R. Delamater, Vincent Campese, Matthew Fein and Daniel S. Wheeler

      Article first published online: 5 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08113.x

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      Four experiments examined the roles of the basolateral amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex in the formation of sensory-specific associations in conditioned flavor preference and conditioned magazine approach paradigms using US devaluation and selective Pavlovian-instrumental transfer procedures in Long Evans rats. Experiment 1 found that pre-training amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex lesions had no detectable effect on the formation or flexible use of sensory-specific flavor-nutrient associations in a US devaluation task, where flavor cues were paired either simultaneously or sequentially with nutrient rewards in water-deprived subjects.

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