European Journal of Neuroscience

Cover image for Vol. 35 Issue 2

January 2012

Volume 35, Issue 2

Pages 166–340

  1. SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS

    1. Top of page
    2. SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    3. NEUROSYSTEMS
    4. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    5. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    1. The effector and scaffolding proteins AF6 and MUPP1 interact with connexin36 and localize at gap junctions that form electrical synapses in rodent brain (pages 166–181)

      X. Li, B. D. Lynn and J. I. Nagy

      Article first published online: 29 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07947.x

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      Electrical synapses formed by interneuronal gap junctions composed of connexin36 (Cx36) occur in most major structures in the mammalian central nervous system. These synapses link ensembles of neurons and influence their network properties.

    2. AMPA receptor modulation by cornichon-2 dictated by transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory protein isoform (pages 182–194)

      Martin B. Gill, Akihiko S. Kato, He Wang and David S. Bredt

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07948.x

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      Transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) are auxiliary subunits that modulate AMPA receptor trafficking, gating and pharmacology throughout the brain. Why cornichon-2 (CNIH-2), another AMPA receptor-associated protein, modulates AMPA receptor gating and pharmacology in hippocampal neurons but not cerebellar granule neurons remains unresolved.

  2. NEUROSYSTEMS

    1. Top of page
    2. SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    3. NEUROSYSTEMS
    4. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    5. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    1. Activity-dependent actin dynamics are required for the maintenance of long-term plasticity and for synaptic capture (pages 195–206)

      Rosalina Fonseca

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07955.x

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      The maintenance of long-lasting forms of plasticity, such as long-term potentiation (LTP) is dependent on the capture of plasticity-related proteins (PRPs) in an input-specific manner – synaptic capture. Here, it is shown that LTP, induced at Schaffer collaterals–CA1 synapses in acute rat hippocampal slice preparation, is not sensitive to protein synthesis inhibition if N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are blocked, suggesting that synaptic activation is involved in the modulation of LTP maintenance.

    2. Striatal NTS1, dopamine D2 and NMDA receptor regulation of pallidal GABA and glutamate release – a dual-probe microdialysis study in the intranigral 6-hydroxydopamine unilaterally lesioned rat (pages 207–220)

      Luca Ferraro, William T. O’Connor, Sarah Beggiato, Maria C. Tomasini, Kjell Fuxe, Sergio Tanganelli and Tiziana Antonelli

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07949.x

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      The current microdialysis study elucidates a functional interaction between the striatal neurotensin NTS1 receptor and the striatal dopamine D2 and N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors in the regulation of striatopallidal gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate levels after an ipsilateral intranigral 6-hydroxydopamine-induced lesion of the ascending dopamine pathways to the striatum. Lateral globus pallidus GABA levels were higher in the lesioned group while no change was observed in striatal GABA and glutamate levels.

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      Differential effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 on hindlimb function in paraplegic rats (pages 221–232)

      Vanessa S. Boyce, Jihye Park, Fred H. Gage and Lorne M. Mendell

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07950.x

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      We compared the effect of viral administration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or neurotrophin 3 (NT-3) on locomotor recovery in adult rats with complete thoracic (T10) spinal cord transection injuries, in order to determine the effect of chronic neurotrophin expression on spinal plasticity. At the time of injury, BDNF, NT-3 or green fluorescent protein (GFP) (control) was delivered to the lesion via adeno-associated virus (AAV) constructs.

    4. Impaired wake-promoting mechanisms in ghrelin receptor-deficient mice (pages 233–243)

      Matthew Esposito, Jacob Pellinen, Levente Kapás and Éva Szentirmai

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07946.x

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      Ghrelin receptors are expressed by key components of the arousal system. Exogenous ghrelin induces behavioral activation, promotes wakefulness and stimulates eating.

    5. Cellular anatomy, physiology and epileptiform activity in the CA3 region of Dcx knockout mice: a neuronal lamination defect and its consequences (pages 244–256)

      Michael Bazelot, Jean Simonnet, Céline Dinocourt, Elodie Bruel-Jungerman, Richard Miles, Desdemona Fricker and Fiona Francis

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07962.x

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      We report data on the neuronal form, synaptic connectivity, neuronal excitability and epileptiform population activities generated by the hippocampus of animals with an inactivated doublecortin gene. The protein product of this gene affects neuronal migration during development.

    6. Right–left asymmetry in the cortical processing of sounds for social communication vs. navigation in mustached bats (pages 257–270)

      Jagmeet S. Kanwal

      Article first published online: 29 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07951.x

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      In the Doppler-shifted constant frequency processing area in the primary auditory cortex of mustached bats, Pteronotus parnellii, neurons respond to both social calls and to echolocation signals. This multifunctional nature of cortical neurons creates a paradox for simultaneous processing of two behaviorally distinct categories of sound.

    7. Dispositional empathy modulates vicarious effects of dynamic pain expressions on spinal nociception, facial responses and acute pain (pages 271–278)

      Jean-Philippe Mailhot, Etienne Vachon-Presseau, Philip L. Jackson and Pierre Rainville

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07953.x

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      Pain communication is thought to promote automatic vicarious self-protective responses as well as empathic concern towards others’ suffering. This duality was recently highlighted in a study showing that highly empathic individuals display increased vicarious facilitation of low-level pain processing (nociceptive flexion reflex, NFR) combined with an unexpected reduced facilitation of self-pain perception (pain ratings) while viewing static pictures evoking pain in others.

  3. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    3. NEUROSYSTEMS
    4. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    5. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    1. Inputs from the basolateral amygdala to the nucleus accumbens shell control opiate reward magnitude via differential dopamine D1 or D2 receptor transmission (pages 279–290)

      Alessandra Lintas, Ning Chi, Nicole M. Lauzon, Stephanie F. Bishop, Ninglei Sun, Huibing Tan and Steven R. Laviolette

      Article first published online: 12 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07943.x

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      The basolateral amygdala (BLA), ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens (NAc) form a functionally connected neural circuit involved in the processing of opiate-related reward and memory. Dopamine (DA) projections from the ventral tegmental area to the BLA modulate associative plasticity mechanisms within the BLA.

    2. De novo synthesis of PERIOD initiates circadian oscillation in cultured mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus after prolonged inhibition of protein synthesis by cycloheximide (pages 291–299)

      Shin-ya Nishide, Daisuke Ono, Yoshiko Yamada, Sato Honma and Ken-ichi Honma

      Article first published online: 12 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07952.x

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      The circadian oscillation is known to stop with prolonged inhibition of protein synthesis and to restart from a particular phase after the removal of inhibition. In order to know the underlying molecular mechanisms, the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus was cultured and treated with a protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide (CHX), for various durations. Circadian rhythms in Bmal1 expression and PER2 protein were monitored by means of bioluminescence reporters.

    3. Regulator of calmodulin signaling knockout mice display anxiety-like behavior and motivational deficits (pages 300–308)

      Maya M. Davis, Peter Olausson, Paul Greengard, Jane R. Taylor and Angus C. Nairn

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07956.x

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      Regulator of calmodulin (CaM) signaling (RCS), when phosphorylated by protein kinase A (PKA) on Ser55, binds to CaM and inhibits CaM-dependent signaling. RCS expression is high in the dorsal striatum, nucleus accumbens and amygdala, suggesting that the protein is involved in limbic-striatal function.

  4. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    3. NEUROSYSTEMS
    4. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    5. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    1. The anterior superior parietal lobule and its interactions with language and motor areas during writing (pages 309–322)

      Emily Segal and Michael Petrides

      Article first published online: 20 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07937.x

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      Past neuroimaging studies of writing demonstrate activation foci in several regions of the posterior parietal cortex (PPC). The present study aimed to dissociate the role of the superior parietal lobule (SPL) from the other PPC regions using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and functional connectivity.

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      The modulation of motor cortex excitability during motor imagery depends on imagery quality (pages 323–331)

      Florent Lebon, Winston D. Byblow, Christian Collet, Aymeric Guillot and Cathy M. Stinear

      Article first published online: 15 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07938.x

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      Motor imagery (MI) increases corticomotor excitability and modulates intracortical inhibition. This study aimed to relate these neurophysiological mechanisms to imagery quality.

    3. Dissociation between unconscious motor response facilitation and conflict in medial frontal areas (pages 332–340)

      Kevin D’Ostilio and Gaëtan Garraux

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2011.07941.x

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      Masked prime tasks have shown that sensory information that has not been consciously perceived can nevertheless modulate behavior. The neuronal correlates of behavioral manifestations of visuomotor priming remain debated, particularly with respect to the distribution and direction (i.e. increase or decrease) of activity changes in medial frontal areas.

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