European Journal of Neuroscience

Cover image for Vol. 35 Issue 8

April 2012

Volume 35, Issue 8

Pages 1201–1380

  1. TECHNICAL SPOTLIGHT

    1. Top of page
    2. TECHNICAL SPOTLIGHT
    3. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    4. NEUROSYSTEMS
    5. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    1. You have free access to this content
      Thinking of Co2+-staining explant tissue or cultured cells? How to make it reliable and specific (pages 1201–1207)

      Mark R. P. Aurousseau, Ingrid K. Osswald and Derek Bowie

      Article first published online: 18 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08042.x

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      Ca2+ and/or Zn2+ entry into neurons and glial cells is often a key step driving the processes of neurodevelopment and disease. As a result, a major pre-occupation of many neuroscientists has been in tracking down when and where nervous tissues express ion channels with appreciable divalent ion permeability. The cobalt staining technique identifies cells expressing divalent-permeable ion-channels as shown here for HEK293 cells.

  2. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. TECHNICAL SPOTLIGHT
    3. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    4. NEUROSYSTEMS
    5. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    1. Neuroblast survival depends on mature vascular network formation after mouse stroke: role of endothelial and smooth muscle progenitor cell co-administration (pages 1208–1217)

      Lina R. Nih, Nicolas Deroide, Carole Leré-Déan, Dominique Lerouet, Mathieu Soustrat, Bernard I. Levy, Jean-Sébastien Silvestre, Tatiana Merkulova-Rainon, Marc Pocard, Isabelle Margaill and Nathalie Kubis

      Article first published online: 18 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08041.x

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      Pro-angiogenic cell-based therapies constitute an interesting and attractive approach to enhancing post-stroke neurogenesis and decreasing neurological deficit. However, most new stroke-induced neurons die during the first few weeks after ischemia, thus impairing total recovery.

    2. Prostaglandin E2 is an endogenous modulator of cerebellar development and complex behavior during a sensitive postnatal period (pages 1218–1229)

      Shannon L. Dean, Jessica F. Knutson, Desiree L. Krebs-Kraft and Margaret M. McCarthy

      Article first published online: 18 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08032.x

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      Prostaglandins are lipid-derived molecules that mediate the generation of fever in the central nervous system. In addition to their proinflammatory role, prostaglandins also impact neuronal development and synaptic plasticity, sometimes in a sex-specific manner.

    3. Spontaneous depolarization wave in the mouse embryo: origin and large-scale propagation over the CNS identified with voltage-sensitive dye imaging (pages 1230–1241)

      Yoko Momose-Sato, Tomoharu Nakamori and Katsushige Sato

      Article first published online: 17 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.07997.x

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      Spontaneous embryonic movements, called embryonic motility, are produced by correlated spontaneous activity in the cranial and spinal nerves, which is driven by brainstem and spinal networks. Using optical imaging with a voltage-sensitive dye, we have revealed previously that this correlated activity is a widely propagating wave of neural depolarization, which we termed the depolarization wave.

    4. Pharmacological mechanisms underlying switching from the large-scale depolarization wave to segregated activity in the mouse central nervous system (pages 1242–1252)

      Yoko Momose-Sato, Tomoharu Nakamori and Katsushige Sato

      Article first published online: 18 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08040.x

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      During the early development of the nervous system, synchronized activity is observed in a variety of structures, and is considered to play a fundamental role in neural development. One of the most striking examples of such activity is the depolarization wave reported in chick and rat embryos. In the accompanying paper (Momose-Sato et al., Eur. J. Neurosci., 2012), we have demonstrated that a depolarization wave is also present in the mouse embryo by showing large-scale optical waves, which spread remarkably over the central nervous system, including the spinal cord, hindbrain, cerebellum, midbrain, and forebrain.

  3. NEUROSYSTEMS

    1. Top of page
    2. TECHNICAL SPOTLIGHT
    3. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    4. NEUROSYSTEMS
    5. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    1. Topography of descending projections from anterior insular and medial prefrontal regions to the lateral habenula of the epithalamus in the rat (pages 1253–1269)

      Uhnoh Kim and Taehee Lee

      Article first published online: 18 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08030.x

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      The epithalamic lateral nucleus of the habenula (LHb) plays a key role in regulating firing of dopamine and serotonin neurons in the midbrain and is thereby involved in various cognitive and affective behaviors. It is not yet clear, however, from where the LHb receives cognitive and affective information relevant to its regulation of the midbrain monoaminergic systems.

    2. Functional and laminar dissociations between muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic neuromodulation in the tree shrew primary visual cortex (pages 1270–1280)

      Anwesha Bhattacharyya, Felix Bießmann, Julia Veit, Robert Kretz and Gregor Rainer

      Article first published online: 4 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08052.x

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      Acetylcholine is an important neuromodulator involved in cognitive function. The impact of cholinergic neuromodulation on computations within the cortical microcircuit is not well understood.

    3. Experience-dependent regulation of functional maps and synaptic protein expression in the cat visual cortex (pages 1281–1294)

      Sajjida Jaffer, Vasily Vorobyov, Peter C. Kind and Frank Sengpiel

      Article first published online: 18 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08044.x

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      Although the basis of our knowledge of experience-dependent plasticity comes from studies on carnivores and primates, studies examining the physiological and molecular mechanisms that underlie development and plasticity have increasingly employed mice. We have used several common rearing paradigms, such as dark-rearing and monocular deprivation (MD), to examine the timing of the physiological and molecular changes to altered experience in the cat primary visual cortex.

    4. Morphological patterns of the collateral sulcus in the human brain (pages 1295–1311)

      Sonja C. Huntgeburth and Michael Petrides

      Article first published online: 18 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08031.x

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      The collateral sulcal complex is an important landmark on the medial surface of the temporal lobe. Anteriorly, it delineates the limbic regions of the parahippocampal gyrus from the visual-processing areas of the fusiform gyrus. Posteriorly, it continues into the occipital lobe, bearing no relationship to the memory-related limbic regions.

    5. Different stressors produce excitation or inhibition of mesolimbic dopamine neuron activity: response alteration by stress pre-exposure (pages 1312–1321)

      Ornella Valenti, Kathryn M. Gill and Anthony A. Grace

      Article first published online: 18 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08038.x

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      Stressors can exert a wide variety of responses, ranging from adaptive responses to pathological changes; moreover, recent studies suggest that mild stressors can attenuate the response of a system to major stressful events. We have previously shown that 2-week exposure to cold, a comparatively mild inescapable stressor, induced a pronounced reduction in ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neuron activity, whereas restraint stress increases DA neuron activity.

  4. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. TECHNICAL SPOTLIGHT
    3. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    4. NEUROSYSTEMS
    5. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    1. Social experience affects neuronal responses to male calls in adult female zebra finches (pages 1322–1336)

      F. Menardy, K. Touiki, G. Dutrieux, B. Bozon, C. Vignal, N. Mathevon and C. Del Negro

      Article first published online: 18 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08047.x

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      Plasticity studies have consistently shown that behavioural relevance can change the neural representation of sounds in the auditory system, but what occurs in the context of natural acoustic communication where significance could be acquired through social interaction remains to be explored. The zebra finch, a highly social songbird species that forms lifelong pair bonds and uses a vocalization, the distance call, to identify its mate, offers an opportunity to address this issue.

    2. Lateralized reward-related visual discrimination in the avian entopallium (pages 1337–1343)

      Josine Verhaal, Janina A. Kirsch, Ioannis Vlachos, Martina Manns and Onur Güntürkün

      Article first published online: 27 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08049.x

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      In humans and many other animals, the two cerebral hemispheres are partly specialized for different functions. However, knowledge about the neuronal basis of lateralization is mostly lacking.

    3. Lentiviral-mediated gene delivery reveals distinct roles of nucleus accumbens dopamine D2 and D3 receptors in novelty- and light-induced locomotor activity (pages 1344–1353)

      Alinda R. Fernandes, Alanna C. Easton, Maria A. De Souza Silva, Gunter Schumann, Christian P. Müller and Sylvane Desrivières

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08028.x

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      The importance of the dopaminergic system for proper brain activity is demonstrated by findings that alterations in this system lead to severe disabilities, including motor impairment observed in various neurological and psychiatric disorders. Although the roles of specific dopamine receptors in behaviour have been extensively investigated using pharmacological agents and knockout mice, non-specificity of ligands and compensatory molecular adaptations in mutated animals restrict the interpretation of the results.

    4. Changes in nucleus accumbens and neostriatal c-Fos and DARPP-32 immunoreactivity during different stages of food-reinforced instrumental training (pages 1354–1367)

      Kristen N. Segovia, Merce Correa, Jessica B. Lennington, Joanne C. Conover and John D. Salamone

      Article first published online: 30 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08036.x

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      Nucleus accumbens is involved in several aspects of instrumental behavior, motivation and learning. Recent studies showed that dopamine (DA) release in the accumbens shell was significantly increased on the first day of training on a fixed ratio (FR) 5 schedule (i.e. the transition from FR1 to FR5) compared with those rats that continued FR1 training, even though the rats on their first day of FR5 training received less food reinforcement than rats continuing on the FR1 schedule.

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Serotonin2C receptors in the nucleus accumbens are involved in enhanced alcohol-drinking behavior (pages 1368–1380)

      Kanji Yoshimoto, Yoshihisa Watanabe, Masaki Tanaka and Minoru Kimura

      Article first published online: 18 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08037.x

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      Dopamine and serotonin (5-HT) in the nucleus accumbens (ACC) and ventral tegmental area of the mesoaccumbens reward pathways have been implicated in the mechanisms underlying development of alcohol dependence. We used a C57BL/6J mouse model with increased voluntary alcohol-drinking behavior by exposing the mice to alcohol vapor for 20 consecutive days.

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