European Journal of Neuroscience

Cover image for Vol. 35 Issue 9

May 2012

Volume 35, Issue 9

Pages 1381–1521

  1. SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS

    1. Top of page
    2. SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    3. NEUROSYSTEMS
    4. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    5. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    1. Endogenously released ACh and exogenous nicotine differentially facilitate long-term potentiation induction in the hippocampal CA1 region of mice (pages 1381–1395)

      Sakura Nakauchi and Katumi Sumikawa

      Article first published online: 30 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08056.x

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      We examined the role of α7- and β2-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP). Theta-burst stimulation (TBS), mimicking the brain’s naturally occurring theta rhythm, induced robust LTP in hippocampal slices from α7 and β2 knockout mice.

    2. Imbalanced suppression of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission onto mouse striatal projection neurons during induction of anesthesia with sevoflurane in vitro (pages 1396–1405)

      Yoshiyuki Oose, Masami Miura, Ritsuko Inoue, Nozomi Andou, Toshihiko Aosaki and Kinya Nishimura

      Article first published online: 16 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08065.x

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      Suppression of movement during induction of anesthesia is mediated through subcortical structures. We studied the effects of a brief, 5-min application of a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane (2 MAC) on the electrophysiological activities of the medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the striatum in brain slice preparations, using a whole-cell patch-clamp technique.

    3. Presynaptic inhibition of glutamate transmission by α2 receptors in the VTA (pages 1406–1415)

      Carlos A. Jiménez-Rivera, Johnny Figueroa, Rafael Vázquez-Torres, María E. Vélez-Hernandez, David Schwarz, María C. Velásquez-Martinez and Francisco Arencibia-Albite

      Article first published online: 7 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08029.x

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      The ventral tegmental area (VTA) forms part of the mesocorticolimbic system and plays a pivotal role in reward and reinforcing actions of drugs of abuse. Glutamate transmission within the VTA controls important aspects of goal-directed behavior and motivation.

  2. NEUROSYSTEMS

    1. Top of page
    2. SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    3. NEUROSYSTEMS
    4. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    5. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    1.  

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    2. Featured Article
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      Circadian waves of cytosolic calcium concentration and long-range network connections in rat suprachiasmatic nucleus (pages 1417–1425)

      Jin Hee Hong, Byeongha Jeong, Cheol Hong Min and Kyoung J. Lee

      Article first published online: 16 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08069.x

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      The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the master clock in mammals governing the daily physiological and behavioral rhythms. It is composed of thousands of clock cells with their own intrinsic periods varying over a wide range (20∼28 h).

    3. Convergent inputs from electrically and topographically distinct orexin cells to locus coeruleus and ventral tegmental area (pages 1426–1432)

      J. Antonio González, Lise T. Jensen, Lars Fugger and Denis Burdakov

      Article first published online: 16 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08057.x

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      Orexin/hypocretin (orx/hcrt) neurons are thought to ensure that reward-seeking is accompanied by alertness, but the underlying circuit organization is unclear. In this study, the authors examined the properties of projection-defined populations of orx/hcrt neurons by combining retrograde tracing with topographic mapping and electrophysiology.

    4. Noradrenaline-induced enhancement of oscillatory local field potentials in the mouse accessory olfactory bulb does not depend on disinhibition of mitral cells (pages 1433–1445)

      Emilia Leszkowicz, Selina Khan, Stephanie Ng, Nikita Ved, Daniel L. Swallow and Peter A. Brennan

      Article first published online: 4 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08070.x

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      Reciprocal synapses provide tight coupling of inhibitory feedback from granule cell interneurons to mitral cell projection neurons in the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), at the first stage of vomeronasal processing. Local infusions of either noradrenaline or the metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist DCG-IV suppressed mitral cell activity, contrary to their expected effects on the induction of mate recognition learning in the AOB.

  3. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    3. NEUROSYSTEMS
    4. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    5. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    1. Photoperiodic modulation of the hepatic clock by the suprachiasmatic nucleus and feeding regime in mice (pages 1446–1457)

      Daniela Parkanová, Marta Nováková, Serhiy Sosniyenko and Alena Sumová

      Article first published online: 7 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08045.x

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      Changes in photoperiod modulate the central circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) as well as the peripheral clocks. Consequently, the SCN-driven output rhythms in activity and feeding are also modulated by the photoperiod.

    2. Synchronization of PER1 protein in parabrachial nucleus in a natural model of food anticipatory activity (pages 1458–1465)

      Claudia Juárez, Elvira Morgado, Stefan M. Waliszewski, Armando J. Martínez, Enrique Meza and Mario Caba

      Article first published online: 3 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08051.x

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      Rabbit pups represent a natural model of food anticipatory activity (FAA). FAA is the behavioral output of a putative food entrainable oscillator (FEO). It had been suggested that the FEO is comprised of a distributed system of clocks that work in concert in response to gastrointestinal input by food.

    3. Role of vasoactive intestinal peptide in seasonal encoding by the suprachiasmatic nucleus clock (pages 1466–1474)

      Eliane A. Lucassen, Hester C. van Diepen, Thijs Houben, Stephan Michel, Christopher S. Colwell and Johanna H. Meijer

      Article first published online: 19 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08054.x

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      The neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is critical for encoding of seasonal information by the circadian system. Circadian rhythms in behavior and in neuronal activity of the SCN in VIP-deficient mice show no adaptation to different photoperiods.

  4. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    3. NEUROSYSTEMS
    4. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    5. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    1. You have free access to this content
      Transcranial magnetic stimulation reveals modulation of corticospinal excitability when observing actions with the intention to imitate (pages 1475–1480)

      Robert M. Hardwick, Craig J. McAllister, Paul S. Holmes and Martin G. Edwards

      Article first published online: 22 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08046.x

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      Studies using transcranial magnetic stimulation have demonstrated that action observation can modulate the activity of the corticospinal system. This has been attributed to the activity of an ‘action observation network’, whereby premotor cortex activity influences corticospinal excitability.

    2. Perceived helplessness is associated with individual differences in the central motor output system (pages 1481–1487)

      Tim V. Salomons, Massieh Moayedi, Irit Weissman-Fogel, Michael B. Goldberg, Bruce V. Freeman, Howard C. Tenenbaum and Karen D. Davis

      Article first published online: 7 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08048.x

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      Learned helplessness is a maladaptive response to uncontrollable stress characterized by impaired motor escape responses, reduced motivation and learning deficits. There are important individual differences in the likelihood of becoming helpless following exposure to uncontrollable stress but little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying these individual differences.

    3. Auditory perception and syntactic cognition: brain activity-based decoding within and across subjects (pages 1488–1496)

      Björn Herrmann, Burkhard Maess, Christian Kalberlah, John-Dylan Haynes and Angela D. Friederici

      Article first published online: 16 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08053.x

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      The present magnetoencephalography study investigated whether the brain states of early syntactic and auditory-perceptual processes can be decoded from single-trial recordings with a multivariate pattern classification approach. In particular, it was investigated whether the early neural activation patterns in response to rule violations in basic auditory perception and in high cognitive processes (syntax) reflect a functional organization that largely generalizes across individuals or is subject-specific.

    4. At what time is the cocktail party? A late locus of selective attention to natural speech (pages 1497–1503)

      Alan J. Power, John J. Foxe, Emma-Jane Forde, Richard B. Reilly and Edmund C. Lalor

      Article first published online: 30 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08060.x

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      Distinguishing between speakers and focusing attention on one speaker in multi-speaker environments is extremely important in everyday life. Exactly how the brain accomplishes this feat and, in particular, the precise temporal dynamics of this attentional deployment are as yet unknown.

    5. Categorical representation of objects in the central nucleus of the monkey amygdala (pages 1504–1512)

      Koji Kuraoka and Katsuki Nakamura

      Article first published online: 16 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08061.x

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      The primate amygdala consists of several subnuclei. Neurons in this brain area have been known to respond to stimuli belonging to specific categories of objects, such as faces, animals, and artifacts. However, little is known about the functional differences among the nuclei of the primate amygdala.

    6. Enhancement of motor imagery-related cortical activation during first-person observation measured by functional near-infrared spectroscopy (pages 1513–1521)

      Nagisa Kobashi, Lisa Holper, Felix Scholkmann, Daniel Kiper and Kynan Eng

      Article first published online: 18 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08062.x

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      Activity in secondary motor areas during observation of human limbs performing actions is affected by the observer’s viewpoint. In this article we show enhancement of activation when viewed arms are placed in the correct position relative to the user's egocentric viewpoint.

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