European Journal of Neuroscience

Cover image for Vol. 36 Issue 4

August 2012

Volume 36, Issue 4

Pages 2400–2570

  1. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    3. SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    4. NEUROSYSTEMS
    5. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    6. CORRIGENDUM
    1. Motor endplate disease affects neuromuscular junction maturation (pages 2400–2408)

      Ghislaine Caillol, Hélène Vacher, Magali Musarella, Sarah Bellouze, Bénédicte Dargent and Amapola Autillo-Touati

      Version of Record online: 30 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08164.x

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      The med (motor endplate disease) mouse phenotype appears at a crucial stage of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) development. In the med mice, there is a drastic decrease in Terminal Schwann Cells (TSC) number, persistent multiple-innervation and a defect in synaptic maturation. All together these findings suggest that the med pathology is related to NMJ postnatal structural developmental defects probably triggered by the progressive loss of the TSCs and an ineffective synaptic maturation.

  2. SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS

    1. Top of page
    2. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    3. SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    4. NEUROSYSTEMS
    5. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    6. CORRIGENDUM
    1. Identification, localization and function of glutamate-gated chloride channel receptors in the honeybee brain (pages 2409–2420)

      Abdessalam Kacimi El Hassani, Steffen Schuster, Yan Dyck, Fabien Demares, Gérard Leboulle and Catherine Armengaud

      Version of Record online: 27 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08144.x

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      We localised the expression of the honeybee GluClα subunit at the mRNA and protein levels. We studied their implication in olfactory learning and memory by means of RNA interference against the GluClα subunit. Injection of dsRNA or siRNA resulted in a decrease of retention performances around 24h after injection. Expression of the GluClα protein was necessary for the retrieval of olfactory memories.

    2. Synaptic plasticity from amygdala to perirhinal cortex: a possible mechanism for emotional enhancement of visual recognition memory? (pages 2421–2427)

      Alessandra Perugini, Michael Laing, Nicola Berretta, Giorgio Aicardi and Zafar I. Bashir

      Version of Record online: 23 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08146.x

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      A description of different mechanisms of synaptic plasticity at intracortical and amygdala to perirhinal synapses. The demonstration of an enhancement of perirhinal synaptic plasticity by amygdala stimulation. These results provide potential understanding of the mechanisms of emotional enhancement of memory.

    3. Auditory nerve fibre responses in the ferret (pages 2428–2439)

      Christian J. Sumner and Alan R. Palmer

      Version of Record online: 13 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08151.x

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      The ferret is increasingly used as a model of auditory processing. We characterized the pure tone response characteristics of their auditory nerve fibres. Responses were similar to other mammals. This includes response area shape dependence on characteristic frequency, the distribution of spontaneous rates and the relationship between spontaneous rate and threshold. Quantitatively, the ferret matched the guinea-pig in terms of tuning, the limit of phase-locking, and rate-level functions.

    4. Cholinergic responses in GABAergic and non-GABAergic neurons in the intermediate gray layer of mouse superior colliculus (pages 2440–2451)

      Thongchai Sooksawate, Yuchio Yanagawa and Tadashi Isa

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08169.x

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      Fluorescent photomicrographs of a SC slice (frontal section) of GAD67-GFP knock-in mouse. GABAergic neurons with GFP fluorescence in the SGI are shown in the inset.

    5. Postnatal experience modulates functional properties of mouse olfactory sensory neurons (pages 2452–2460)

      Jiwei He, Huikai Tian, Anderson C. Lee and Minghong Ma

      Version of Record online: 15 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08170.x

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      Early experience considerably modulates the organization and function of all sensory systems. In the mammalian olfactory system, deprivation of the sensory inputs via neonatal, unilateral naris closure has been shown to induce structural, molecular and functional changes from the olfactory epithelium to the olfactory bulb and cortex.

    6. β3 integrin is dispensable for conditioned fear and Hebbian forms of plasticity in the hippocampus (pages 2461–2469)

      A. B. McGeachie, A. E. Skrzypiec, L. A. Cingolani, M. Letellier, R. Pawlak and Y. Goda

      Version of Record online: 2 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08163.x

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      In rodent hippocampal pyramidal neurons, β3 integrin regulates synaptic AMPA receptors and is required for homeostatic plasticity. Here we find that the loss of β3 integrin activity is dispensable for conditioned fear behaviour in mice and for LTP and LTD in acute hippocampal slices, which is in contrast to the loss of β1 integrin that compromises LTP but not LTD. Our findings highlight differential roles for β3 and β1 integrins in supporting hippocampal circuit functions.

  3. NEUROSYSTEMS

    1. Top of page
    2. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    3. SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    4. NEUROSYSTEMS
    5. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    6. CORRIGENDUM
    1. The absence of Complexin 3 and Complexin 4 differentially impacts the ON and OFF pathways in mouse retina (pages 2470–2481)

      Immanuel Landgraf, Johanna Mühlhans, Karin Dedek, Kerstin Reim, Johann H. Brandstätter and Josef Ammermüller

      Version of Record online: 14 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08149.x

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      Complexins (Cplxs) regulate the speed and Ca2+-sensitivity of synaptic vesicle fusion. It has been shown that all four known Cplxs are present at mouse retinal synapses: At conventional amacrine cell synapses (Cplx 1 to Cplx 3) and at photoreceptor and bipolar cell ribbon synapses (Cplx 3 and Cplx4) [Reim, K. et al. (2005) J. Cell Biol., 169, 669–680].

    2. GABA transporter subtype 1 and GABA transporter subtype 3 modulate glutamatergic transmission via activation of presynaptic GABAB receptors in the rat globus pallidus (pages 2482–2492)

      Xiao-Tao Jin, Jean-Francois Paré and Yoland Smith

      Version of Record online: 23 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08147.x

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      The intra-pallidal application of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter subtype 1 (GAT-1) or GABA transporter subtype 3 (GAT-3) transporter blockers [1-(4,4-diphenyl-3-butenyl)-3-piperidinecarboxylic acid hydrochloride (SKF 89976A) or 1-[2-[tris(4-methoxyphenyl)methoxy]ethyl]-(S)-3-piperidinecarboxylic acid (SNAP 5114)] reduces the activity of pallidal neurons in monkey. This effect could be mediated through the activation of presynaptic GABAB heteroreceptors in glutamatergic terminals by GABA spillover following GABA transporter (GAT) blockade.

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      Remote effects of intermittent theta burst stimulation of the human pharyngeal motor system (pages 2493–2499)

      Satish Mistry, Emilia Michou, John Rothwell and Shaheen Hamdy

      Version of Record online: 28 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08157.x

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      The non-invasive brain stimulation protocol intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) is capable of facilitating long-term potentiation-like synaptic plasticity within the brain. We demonstrate for the first time, transcallosal facilitation of human pharyngeal primary motor cortex by iTBS of the contralateral hemisphere (Figures A–E). We conclude that iTBS may have potential novel therapeutic value in the treatment of dysphagia and other oro-motor dysfunctions commonly seen after Stroke.

    4. Visual and auditory cue integration for the generation of saccadic eye movements in monkeys and lever pressing in humans (pages 2500–2504)

      Peter H. Schiller, Michelle C. Kwak and Warren M. Slocum

      Version of Record online: 24 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08133.x

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      This study examined how effectively visual and auditory cues can be integrated in the brain for the generation of motor responses. The latencies with which saccadic eye movements are produced in humans and monkeys form, under certain conditions, a bimodal distribution, the first mode of which has been termed express saccades.

    5. Do proconvulsants modify or halt epileptogenesis? Pentylenetetrazole is ineffective in two rat models of temporal lobe epilepsy (pages 2505–2520)

      Marta Rattka, Claudia Brandt and Wolfgang Löscher

      Version of Record online: 5 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08143.x

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      Some recent studies in models of acquired epilepsy have suggested that proconvulsant drugs could have favourable effects on epileptogenesis. We tested this hypothesis by administering the GABAA receptor antagonist pentylenetetrazole at subconvulsant doses during epileptogenesis induced by status epilepticus in two rat models. This treatment did not prevent development of spontaneous recurrent seizures and did not decrease their frequency or severity, but only moderately shortened their duration.

  4. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    3. SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    4. NEUROSYSTEMS
    5. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    6. CORRIGENDUM
    1. The role of dopamine in the accumbens core in the expression of Pavlovian-conditioned responses (pages 2521–2532)

      Benjamin T. Saunders and Terry E. Robinson

      Version of Record online: 11 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08217.x

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      Ongoing debate exists about dopamine’s exact role in reward-related processes. We took advantage of natural individual variation in the degree to which reward cues are attributed with motivational value, and asked whether dopamine in the core of the nucleus accumbens is necessary for the performance of two forms of Pavlovian conditioned approach behavior - one in which the cue acquires powerful motivational properties (sign-tracking) and another related one in which it does not (goal-tracking). We found that blocking dopamine transmission within the core impaired the expression of sign-tracking responses, but not goal-tracking responses.

    2. Taste uncoupled from nutrition fails to sustain the reinforcing properties of food (pages 2533–2546)

      Jeff A. Beeler, James E. McCutcheon, Zhen F. H. Cao, Mari Murakami, Erin Alexander, Mitchell F. Roitman and Xiaoxi Zhuang

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08167.x

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      Recent findings suggest the reward system encodes metabolic value independent of taste, provoking speculation that the hedonic value of taste could be derived from nutritional value as a secondary appetitive property. We therefore dissociated and compared the impact of nutrition and taste on appetitive behavior in several paradigms.

    3. Identification of chronic stress-activated regions reveals a potential recruited circuit in rat brain (pages 2547–2555)

      Jonathan N. Flak, Matia B. Solomon, Ryan Jankord, Eric G. Krause and James P. Herman

      Version of Record online: 12 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08161.x

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      Chronic variable stress (CVS) causes specific enhancement of delta-FosB expression in select central regulatory circuits, including the prefrontal cortex, posterior hypothalamic nucleus and nucleus of the solitary tract. Delta-FosB changes are not observed in a habituating stress regimen (repeated restraint), implying that CVS-related changes are driven by recruitment of these key cortical, hypothalamic and hindbrain circuits.

    4. Twelve-hour days in the brain and behavior of split hamsters (pages 2556–2566)

      Matthew P. Butler, Megan N. Rainbow, Elizabeth Rodriguez, Sarah M. Lyon and Rae Silver

      Version of Record online: 18 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08166.x

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      In constant light, the hamster’s once-a-day activity bout splits into two 12 h days, and the right and left brain clocks, located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei, cycle in antiphase. We assessed the underlying changes in activity of brain regions that receive monosynaptic inputs from the brain’s circadian clock. Unlike the antiphase 24 h rhythms seen in the left vs. right suprachiasmatic nuclei, CNS target regions had 12 h rhythms in FOS expression that were in-phase between hemispheres.

  5. CORRIGENDUM

    1. Top of page
    2. MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    3. SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    4. NEUROSYSTEMS
    5. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    6. CORRIGENDUM
    1. You have free access to this content
      Ultrastructural characterization of the mesostriatal dopamine innervations in mice, including two mouse lines of conditional VGLUT2 knockout in dopamine neurons (pages 2567–2570)

      Noémie Bérubé-Carrière, Finette Guay, Guillaume M. Fortin, Klas Kullander, Lars Olson, Åsa Wallén-Mackenzie, Louis-Eric Trudeau and Laurent Descarries

      Version of Record online: 20 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08110.x

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