European Journal of Neuroscience

Cover image for Vol. 38 Issue 10

November 2013

Volume 38, Issue 10

Pages 3384–3527

  1. REVIEW

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW
    3. MOLECULAR AND SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    4. NEUROSYSTEMS
    5. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    6. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    7. CORRIGENDUM
    1. Saccade and vergence eye movements: a review of motor and premotor commands (pages 3384–3397)

      Olivier A. Coubard

      Version of Record online: 17 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12356

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      The behavior and neural underpinnings of saccade and vergence eye movements have been subjected to considerable investigations and findings. We review psychophysical and neurophysiological literature and show that motor and premotor neurons are both capable of monocular and/or binocular commands. This bridges apparently incompatible viewpoints of Hering and Helmholtz describing a complex phenomenon – binocular coordination – reconciling neo- Heringian and neo- Helmholtzian psychophysiologists.

  2. MOLECULAR AND SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW
    3. MOLECULAR AND SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    4. NEUROSYSTEMS
    5. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    6. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    7. CORRIGENDUM
    1. Effects of baclofen on mechanical noxious and innocuous transmission in the spinal dorsal horn of the adult rat: in vivo patch-clamp analysis (pages 3398–3407)

      Kaori Fukuhara, Toshihiko Katafuchi and Megumu Yoshimura

      Version of Record online: 20 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12345

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      Effects of a GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen, on mechanical noxious and innocuous transmission in the rat spinal cord were studied by in vivo patch-clamp method. Mechanical noxious transmission is presynaptically blocked through GABAB receptors in the SG and is more effectively suppressed compared with innocuous transmission.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Protein kinase C regulates tonic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition in the hippocampus and thalamus (pages 3408–3423)

      Damian P. Bright and Trevor G. Smart

      Version of Record online: 16 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12352

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      PKC activation causes a down-regulation in tonic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition in hippocampal dentate gyrus granule cells and thalamic dorsal lateral geniculate relay neurons. These findings are corroborated by studying recombinant α4β2δ receptors, which demonstrate a similar inhibition of receptor function, which involves the loss of surface receptors. PKC-mediated phosphorylation is considered an important physiological regulator of tonic GABA inhibition.

  3. NEUROSYSTEMS

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW
    3. MOLECULAR AND SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    4. NEUROSYSTEMS
    5. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    6. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    7. CORRIGENDUM
    1. Neuroprotection and reduction of glial reaction by cannabidiol treatment after sciatic nerve transection in neonatal rats (pages 3424–3434)

      Matheus Perez, Suzana U. Benitez, Luciana P. Cartarozzi, Elaine del Bel, Francisco S. Guimarães and Alexandre L. R. Oliveira

      Version of Record online: 25 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12341

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      Positive effects of cannabidiol on synapse preservation and neuronal survival in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia. Cannabidiol treatment also reduces astroglial and microglial reaction within the microenvironment of spinal motoneurons following early postnatal sciatic nerve axotomy.

    2. Synaptic gating at axonal branches, and sharp-wave ripples with replay: a simulation study (pages 3435–3447)

      Nikita Vladimirov, Yuhai Tu and Roger D. Traub

      Version of Record online: 1 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12342

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      The computational model of in vivo sharp-wave ripples with place cell replay. Excitatory post-synaptic potentials at dendrites gate antidromic spikes arriving from the axonal collateral, and thus determine when the soma and the main axon fire (A). The model allows synchronous replay of pyramidal cells during sharp-wave ripple event, and the replay is possible in both forward and reverse directions (B, excitatory synaptic connections; C, somatic voltage of the cells).

    3. Simple and complex acoustic regularities are encoded at different levels of the auditory hierarchy (pages 3448–3455)

      Heike Althen, Sabine Grimm and Carles Escera

      Version of Record online: 1 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12346

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      Frequency-location deviants of an auditory feature-conjunction paradigm did not elicit any modulations of the Na, Pa or Nb auditory middle latency waves. In contrast, deviants of a frequency oddball paradigm elicited an enhancement of the Nb wave. These findings corroborate the notion that simple auditory regularities are encoded upstream to more complex auditory regularities and go in line with the idea of a hierarchically working auditory novelty system.

    4. Visual cortex organisation in a macaque monkey with macular degeneration (pages 3456–3464)

      Yibin Shao, Georgios A. Keliris, Amalia Papanikolaou, M. Dominik Fischer, Ditta Zobor, Herbert Jägle, Nikos K. Logothetis and Stelios M. Smirnakis

      Version of Record online: 23 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12349

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      FMRI study on a macaque monkey with macular degeneration suggests that the border of the V1 lesion projection zone remained stable while population receptive field (pRF) size of non-deafferented V1 increased slightly. Remarkably, V5/MT of the MD animal showed extensive activation compared to controls with pRF size distributions differing markedly. These results suggest that V5/MT has a higher potential for reorganisation after macular degeneration than earlier visual cortex.

  4. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW
    3. MOLECULAR AND SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    4. NEUROSYSTEMS
    5. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    6. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    7. CORRIGENDUM
    1. Functional integrity of the habenula is necessary for social play behaviour in rats (pages 3465–3475)

      Linda W. M. van Kerkhof, Ruth Damsteegt, Viviana Trezza, Pieter Voorn and Louk J. M. J. Vanderschuren

      Version of Record online: 16 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12353

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      During post-weaning development, a marked increase in peer-peer interactions is observed in mammals, including humans, which is signified by the abundance of social play behaviour. This paper describes the importance of habenula function for processing of positive (i.e. social play behaviour) and negative (i.e. social isolation) social information in adolescent rats.

    2. Portal glucose influences the sensory, cortical and reward systems in rats (pages 3476–3486)

      Fabien Delaere, Hideo Akaoka, Filipe De Vadder, Adeline Duchampt and Gilles Mithieux

      Version of Record online: 8 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12354

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      Intestinal gluconeogenesis and portal glucose (PoG) sensing mediate the satiety effect of protein-enriched diets (PED). In addition to brain regions classically involved in energy homeostasis (parabrachial nucleus, hypothalamus), PoG might also influence food preference and reward via multiple targets including the olfactory bulb, amygdala, nucleus accumbens and orbitofrontal cortex. PED induce similar effects in the hypothalamus and olfactory bulb, while diets rich in fat and sucrose do not.

    3. Extended-access, but not limited-access, methamphetamine self-administration induces behavioral and nucleus accumbens dopamine response changes in rats (pages 3487–3495)

      Romain Le Cozannet, Athina Markou and Ronald Kuczenski

      Version of Record online: 23 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12361

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      In the extended but not in limited access groups, the microdialysis results revealed tolerance to the methamphetamine-induced increases in extracellular dopamine in the nucleus accumbens, which may be associated with the increased lever pressing (higher methamphetamine intake), and drug seeking observed during the first hour of drug exposure, and may result in more severe consequences in other structures responsible for the behavioral deficits observed.

  5. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW
    3. MOLECULAR AND SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    4. NEUROSYSTEMS
    5. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    6. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    7. CORRIGENDUM
    1. Not all errors are created equally: specific ERN responses for errors originating from distractor-based response retrieval (pages 3496–3506)

      Daniel Wiswede, Klaus Rothermund and Christian Frings

      Version of Record online: 20 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12340

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      We tested whether the error-related negativity (ERN) differs depending on the error source. Errors originating from distractor-based response retrieval produced a more negative ERN compared to other types of errors. The mechanism we reported here helps to detect previous Stimulus-Response-episodes that have led to a wrong response due to the repetition of an accompanying irrelevant stimulus. This control mechanism is adaptive because it prevents the emergence of inadequate response routines.

    2. Goal or movement? Action representation within the primary motor cortex (pages 3507–3512)

      Andrea Cavallo, Giulia Bucchioni, Umberto Castiello and Cristina Becchio

      Version of Record online: 20 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12343

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      How exactly are observed actions mapped on the observer's motor system? In the present TMS study, we demonstrate that at movement onset, motor evoked potentials recorded from intrinsic hand muscles reflect the program necessary to achieve the action goal within a certain situational context. During movement observation, however, the type of observed movement is taken into account and a transition towards a movement-related modulation is observed.

    3. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation over the supramarginal gyrus facilitates pitch memory (pages 3513–3518)

      Nora K. Schaal, Victoria J. Williamson and Michael J. Banissy

      Version of Record online: 22 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12344

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      By using anodal direct current stimulation over the left supramarginal gyrus, we aimed to determine whether pitch memory performance could be improved. Post stimulation, the anodal group performed significantly better on two pitch memory tasks; performance did not differ on the face memory control task. These findings provide strong support for the causal involvement of the left SMG in the pitch memory process and highlight the potential efficacy of tDCS as a tool to improve cognitive abilities.

    4. Differential modulation of activity related to the anticipation of monetary gains and losses across the menstrual cycle (pages 3519–3526)

      Janine Bayer, Pia Bandurski and Tobias Sommer

      Version of Record online: 25 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12347

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      Women were examined by functional neuroimaging during performing a modified version of the ‘Monetary Incentive Delay’ task in two phases of their menstrual cycle. While the anticipation of gain and loss magnitude elicited similar activation patterns when hormones were low, high hormone levels altered brain activity differentially during the anticipation of high vs. low gains compared to losses. Current results connect to literature on different mechanisms underlying the processing of gains and losses.

  6. CORRIGENDUM

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW
    3. MOLECULAR AND SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    4. NEUROSYSTEMS
    5. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    6. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    7. CORRIGENDUM
    1. You have free access to this content
      Alterations in hippocampal network oscillations and theta-gamma coupling arise before Aβ overproduction in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (page 3527)

      Romain Goutagny, Ning Gu, Chelsea Cavanagh, Jesse Jackson, Jean-Guy Chabot, Rémi Quirion, Slavica Krantic and Sylvain Williams

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12446

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