European Journal of Neuroscience

Cover image for Vol. 38 Issue 12

December 2013

Volume 38, Issue 12

Pages 3679–3807

  1. NEUROSYSTEMS

    1. Top of page
    2. NEUROSYSTEMS
    3. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    4. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    5. DISORDERS OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM
    1. Microarray-assisted fine mapping of quantitative trait loci on chromosome 15 for susceptibility to seizure-induced cell death in mice (pages 3679–3690)

      P. E. Schauwecker

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12351

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      It is clear that genetic factors play a role in determining susceptibility to seizure-induced cell death among strains of mice. Here, we used an integrative transcriptomic and genomic approach to identify novel candidate genes contributing to the trait of seizure-induced cell death in mice. We identified nine putative candidate genes that are alternatively spliced between the strains and may provide new insights into the neuropathological sequelae of epilepsy.

    2. Electrical stimulation accelerates nerve regeneration and functional recovery in delayed peripheral nerve injury in rats (pages 3691–3701)

      Jinghui Huang, Yongguang Zhang, Lei Lu, Xueyu Hu and Zhuojing Luo

      Article first published online: 10 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12370

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Brief ES to proximal nerve stumps is capable of promoting nerve regeneration and functional recovery in DNIR, with the longest duration of 24 weeks. BDNF-mediated neurotrophin signaling might be one of the contributing factors to the beneficial effect of brief ES on DNIR. Brief ES might be used as a useful method to improve functional recovery for delayed repair of peripheral nerve lesions.

    3. Rapid and persistent impairments of the forelimb motor representations following cervical deafferentation in rats (pages 3702–3711)

      Yu-Qiu Jiang, Preston T. J. A. Williams and John H. Martin

      Article first published online: 6 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12372

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Skilled motor control is regulated by the convergence of somatic sensory and motor signals. Using rats with C4–C8 dorsal rhizotomy, we investigated the effect of sensory deprivation on the cortical motor representations using ICMS. We found an immediate reduction in the distal forelimb representation, a delayed expansion of the elbow representation, and a delayed distal threshold elevation. Degradation of the distal representation likely contributes to the motor deficits after deafferentation.

    4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Parallelism in the brain's visual form system (pages 3712–3720)

      Yoshihito Shigihara and Semir Zeki

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12371

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to determine whether increasingly complex forms constituted from the same elements (lines) activate visual cortex with the same or different latencies. Twenty right-handed healthy adult volunteers viewed two different forms, lines and rhomboids, representing two levels of complexity.

    5. Monkey gaze behaviour during action observation and its relationship to mirror neuron activity (pages 3721–3730)

      Monica Maranesi, Francesca Ugolotti Serventi, Stefania Bruni, Marco Bimbi, Leonardo Fogassi and Luca Bonini

      Article first published online: 9 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12376

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Mirror neurons (MNs) can discharge stronger during action observation depending on whether or not the monkey looks at the action. MN response is triggered by the onset of the experimenter's movement, but when the gaze is proactive the peak of activity is earlier and the discharge intensity stronger than when the gaze is reactive. We propose that feed-forward and feed-back mechanisms might contribute to both MN response and the control of gaze behaviour during action observation.

  2. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. NEUROSYSTEMS
    3. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    4. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    5. DISORDERS OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM
    1. Newly paired zebra finches have higher dopamine levels and immediate early gene Fos expression in dopaminergic neurons (pages 3731–3739)

      Sunayana B. Banerjee, Brian G. Dias, David Crews and Elizabeth Adkins-Regan

      Article first published online: 8 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12378

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Most birds are socially monogamous, yet little is known about the neural pathways underlying avian monogamy. Recent studies have implicated dopamine as playing a role in courtship and affiliation in a socially monogamous songbird, the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata).

    2. Avoidance-based human Pavlovian-to-instrumental transfer (pages 3740–3748)

      Andrea H. Lewis, Michael A. Niznikiewicz, Andrew R. Delamater and Mauricio R. Delgado

      Article first published online: 10 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12377

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In this study, we used fMRI to investigate how aversive Pavlovian cues can motivate avoidance behavior in humans using a Pavlovian-to-instrumental transfer paradigm. Specific and general transfer effects were observed, both of which correlated with increased activity in corticostriatal circuits. This finding suggests that the neural representation of avoidance-based PIT is similar to that of PIT in an appetitive context, and has implications for negative reinforcement-based models of drug-seeking behavior.

    3. Withdrawal from extended-access cocaine self-administration results in dysregulated functional activity and altered locomotor activity in rats (pages 3749–3757)

      Erin S. Calipari, Thomas J. R. Beveridge, Sara R. Jones and Linda J. Porrino

      Article first published online: 13 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12381

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Functional and behavioral effects of 48 h withdrawal from cocaine self-administration were assessed and compared to controls. Reductions in glucose metabolism were measured in a broad expanse of the brain, including circuits involved in reward processing, learning and memory, attention and sleep, and were accompanied by altered locomotor activity. Data demonstrate that disruptions are present in absence of drug and persist after cocaine has been cleared.

  3. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. NEUROSYSTEMS
    3. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    4. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    5. DISORDERS OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM
    1. Spatiotopic perceptual learning mediated by retinotopic processing and attentional remapping (pages 3758–3767)

      En Zhang, Gong-Liang Zhang and Wu Li

      Article first published online: 30 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12379

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      By combining perceptual learning with a gaze-contingent experimental design, we studied the mechanisms underlying spatiotopic (world-centered) visual representation. Learning induced a specific spatiotopic preference, which was in turn specific to the trained retinal location and stimulus attribute and was affected by the deployment of attention. Our results indicate a pliable spatiotopic processing mechanism mediated by interactions between retinotopic processing and attentional remapping.

    2. The effect of task-irrelevant visual backgrounds on human transcranial magnetic stimulation-evoked electroencephalography responses and cortical alpha activity (pages 3768–3777)

      Renate Rutiku, Anu Einberg, Kuniyasu Imanaka and Talis Bachmann

      Article first published online: 30 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12374

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Are EEG responses to TMS modulated by the type of information the visual cortex currently contains? We found that TMS-evoked responses differ between categories of photographs. More general classes of backgrounds, such as sinusoidal gratings and moving dot-patterns, have an effect on ongoing alpha-ocillations as well as TMS-evoked responses. We therefore conclude that different types of steady perceptual input modulate visual cortex reactivity and/or connectivity and it is possible to measure these modulations by combining TMS with EEG.

    3. Effects of transcranial direct current stimulation on risky decision making are mediated by ‘hot’ and ‘cold’ decisions, personality, and hemisphere (pages 3778–3785)

      Jürgen Pripfl, Renate Neumann, Ulla Köhler and Claus Lamm

      Article first published online: 11 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12375

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We used two different versions of a risky decision making game and investigated whether anodal left/cathodal right or vice versa tDCS over the DLPFC influences the risky choices made in this game in smokers vs. non-smokers. Left anodal/right cathodal stimulation decreased risk taking in the “cold” cognition version of the task, in both groups, while in the “hot” affect-charged version, right anodal/left cathodal stimulation decreased risk taking in smokers and increased it in non-smokers.

  4. DISORDERS OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM

    1. Top of page
    2. NEUROSYSTEMS
    3. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    4. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    5. DISORDERS OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM
    1. Phagocytic microglial phenotype induced by glibenclamide improves functional recovery but worsens hyperalgesia after spinal cord injury in adult rats (pages 3786–3798)

      Elena Redondo-Castro, Joaquim Hernández, Nicole Mahy and Xavier Navarro

      Article first published online: 2 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12382

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Injury to CNS involves an initial microgliosis followed by a more persistent astrogliosis. Ideally, both populations might come back to their resting phenotypes once the lesion is repaired and neuroinflammation is resolved. Spinal cord injuries usually imply an abnormally persistent glial activation, which contributes to the detrimental effects of the secondary phase, such as hyperexcitability and neuropathic pain. Our treatment with GB is aimed to trigger the initial activation of microglia in order to better scavenge all the myelin and cell debris just after the contusion. Indeed, GB promotes a minor infiltration of macrophage and microglia, but with an enhanced phagocytic phenotype. This results as a better functional performance, better tissular preservation, but also a worsening in neuropathic pain signs.

    2. Multiple sessions of transcranial direct current stimulation to the intact hemisphere improves visual function after unilateral ablation of visual cortex (pages 3799–3807)

      R. J. Rushmore, C. DeSimone and A. Valero-Cabré

      Article first published online: 3 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12373

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Seventy sessions of cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS; 2 mA, 20' each session, 5 days a week for 14 weeks) to the contralesional visuoparietal cortex produced lasting recovery of visual function after unilateral lesion of visual cortex. Recovery was progressive, plateaued at week 10 of treatment (50 sessions of tDCS), and restored approximately 50% of prelesion performance. These findings highlight the importance of multiple sessions of tDCS to produce recovery of function after unilateral lesion.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION