European Journal of Neuroscience

Cover image for Vol. 38 Issue 5

September 2013

Volume 38, Issue 5

Pages 2649–2811

  1. DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    3. MOLECULAR AND SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    4. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    5. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    1.  

      Commentary on Featured article
    2. Featured article
      Paradoxical increase in survival of newborn neurons in the dentate gyrus of mice with constitutive depletion of serotonin (pages 2650–2658)

      Silvina L. Diaz, Nicolas Narboux-Nême, Sara Trowbridge, Sophie Scotto-Lomassese, Felix B. Kleine Borgmann, Sebastian Jessberger, Bruno Giros, Luc Maroteaux, Evan Deneris and Patricia Gaspar

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12297

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      Although increased adult neurogenesis is a neurobiological correlate of the beneficial effects of antidepressants, the consequences of 5-HT depletion are still unclear. We analysed 2 genetic models and a pharmacological model of 5-HT depletion. In all models, including the Pet1-KO mice, we found significant increase in the survival of newborn neurons. Administration of the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT normalised this prosurvival effects. Our results indicate a role of 5-HT in selective neuronal elimination.

    3. Type I phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase γ is required for neuronal migration in the mouse developing cerebral cortex (pages 2659–2671)

      Yoshinobu Hara, Masahiro Fukaya, Hideaki Tamaki and Hiroyuki Sakagami

      Version of Record online: 27 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12286

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      PIP5Kγ_i2 regulates neuronal migration during cortical formation possibly through recruitment of talin and FAK in adherence sites.

  2. MOLECULAR AND SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS

    1. Top of page
    2. DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    3. MOLECULAR AND SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    4. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    5. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    1. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-coactivator-1 alpha coordinates sphingolipid metabolism, lipid raft composition and myelin protein synthesis (pages 2672–2683)

      Alberto Camacho, Jeffrey K. Huang, Ilse Delint-Ramirez, Chong Yew Tan, Maria Fuller, Christopher J. Lelliott, Antonio Vidal-Puig and Robin J. M. Franklin

      Version of Record online: 14 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12281

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      Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-coactivator-1 alpha (PGC1a) is involved in energy and lipid metabolism, and its loss leads to neurodegeneration. Ablation of PGC1a increased phosphatidylcholine and decreased ceramides in the brain. An analysis of lipid raft fractions revealed increased ceramide, glucocylceramides and GM1 ganglioside in the PGC1a mutants. We suggest that PGC1a coactivator coordinates brain age-dependent sphingolipid metabolism and oligodendrocyte differentiation.

    2. The majority of newly generated cells in the adult mouse substantia nigra express low levels of Doublecortin, but their proliferation is unaffected by 6-OHDA-induced nigral lesion or Minocycline-mediated inhibition of neuroinflammation (pages 2684–2692)

      Maik M. A. Worlitzer, Thomas Viel, Andreas H. Jacobs and Jens C. Schwamborn

      Version of Record online: 5 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12269

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      The majority of newly generated cells in the substantia nigra are positive for Doublecortin (Dcx). Generation of this cells is independent from Parkinson's disease associated neuronal degeneration and accompanying neuroinflammation. Importantly, there is no evidence that these Dcx positive cells differentiate into neurons or oligodendrocytes, consequently they seem to represent a novel cell type.

    3. Dysregulation of the neuregulin-1–ErbB network modulates endogenous oligodendrocyte differentiation and preservation after spinal cord injury (pages 2693–2715)

      Marie-Krystel Gauthier, Kamilla Kosciuczyk, Laura Tapley and Soheila Karimi-Abdolrezaee

      Version of Record online: 13 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12268

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      Neuregulin-1 (Nrg-1) and ErbB receptors modulate several aspects of oligodendrocyte biology including differentiation and myelination. In rat spinal cord injury (SCI), we found a rapid and sustained downregulation of Nrg-1 that is correlated with the poor replacement of oligodendrocytes and remyelination seen after SCI. We show that increasing the bio-availability of Nrg-1 after SCI augments the generation of new oligodendrocytes while reducing scar forming astrocytes. Our work suggests a potential for Nrg-1 as a therapeutic target for promoting remyelination following SCI.

    4. Modulation of presynaptic Ca2+ currents in frog motor nerve terminals by high pressure (pages 2716–2729)

      Ben Aviner, Gideon Gradwohl, Homer J. Moore and Yoram Grossman

      Version of Record online: 5 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12267

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      Pressure effects on terminal Ca2+ currents were studied in frog Rana pipiens peripheral motor nerve. The terminal currents, evoked by nerve or direct stimulation, were recorded under the nerve perineurial sheath. The combined use of Na+ and K+ channel blockers, [Ca2+]o changes, voltage dependent Ca2+ channel (VDCC) blockers treatments, and high pressure (HP) perturbations revealed two components of presynaptic Ca2+ currents: an early fast phase (ICaF) and a late slow and long lasting phase (ICaS). HP reduced the amplitude and decreased the maximum (saturation level) of the Ca2+ currents, the ICaF being more sensitive to pressure. HP also moderately diminished the Na+ action current, which contributed to the depression of VDCC currents. Computer based modeling was used to verify the interpretation of the currents and investigate HP influence on the presynaptic currents. The direct HP reduction of the VDCCs currents and the indirect effect due to action potential decrease are probably the major cause of pressure depression of synaptic release.

    5. Multiple episodes of sodium depletion in the rat: a remodeling of the electrical properties of median preoptic nucleus neurons (pages 2730–2741)

      Aurore N. Voisin, Didier Mouginot and Guy Drolet

      Version of Record online: 5 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12273

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      In rat brain, the detection and integration of chemosensory and neural signals are achieved, inter alia, by the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) during a disturbance of the hydromineral balance. This is allowed through the presence of the sodium (Na+) sensor neurons.

  3. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    3. MOLECULAR AND SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    4. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    5. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    1. Reduced brain corticotropin-releasing factor receptor activation is required for adequate maternal care and maternal aggression in lactating rats (pages 2742–2750)

      Stefanie M. Klampfl, Inga D. Neumann and Oliver J. Bosch

      Version of Record online: 7 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12274

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      In lactating rats, either bred for extremes in anxiety or non-selected, activating brain CRF receptors with CRF reduced maternal care under basal conditions and impaired maternal aggression while blocking CRF receptors with D-Phe improved the stress-induced impairment of maternal care and reduced anxiety. Thus, reduced activation of brain CRF receptors is a necessary prerequisite for the expression of appropriate maternal care and aggression as well as for attenuated anxiety in lactation.

    2. Unilateral inactivation of the basolateral amygdala attenuates context-induced renewal of Pavlovian-conditioned alcohol-seeking (pages 2751–2761)

      N. Chaudhri, C. A. Woods, L. L. Sahuque, T. M. Gill and P. H. Janak

      Version of Record online: 12 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12278

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      Environmental contexts associated with drug use can have a profound impact on drug-seeking behaviour. The present data reveal that unilateral inactivation of the basolateral amygdala attenuates context-induced renewal of Pavlovian-conditioned alcohol-seeking in rats. This novel result suggests that the capacity of alcohol-contexts to influence conditioned responses elicited by Pavlovian alcohol cues is highly reliant on the basolateral amygdala.

    3. A role for the ventral pallidum in context-induced and primed reinstatement of alcohol seeking (pages 2762–2773)

      Christina J. Perry and Gavan P. McNally

      Version of Record online: 17 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12283

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      Mu opioid receptors in the ventral pallidum mediate context-induced and primed reinstatement of alcohol seeking. Reinstatement is associated with multiple active projections to the ventral pallidum, including accumbens core, basolateral amygdala, and paraventricular thalamus.

    4. Cholinergic control of morphine-induced locomotion in rostromedial tegmental nucleus versus ventral tegmental area sites (pages 2774–2785)

      David I. Wasserman, Haoran G. Wang, Asim J. Rashid, Sheena A. Josselyn and John S. Yeomans

      Version of Record online: 17 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12279

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      M5-HSV transfections of VTA dopamine and non-dopamine neurons increased morphine-induced locomotion in wild-type and M5 knockout mice. M5-HSV transfections of RMTg GABA neurons reduced morphine-induced locomotion in the wild-types and knockouts. Cholera-toxin B retrograde tracing from VTA identified RMTg GABA neurons, and caudal PT and LDT cholinergic neurons as inputs.

  4. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    3. MOLECULAR AND SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS
    4. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    5. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
    1. Effects of regularity on the processing of sound omission in a tone sequence in musicians and non-musicians (pages 2786–2792)

      Kentaro Ono, Masao Matsuhashi, Tatsuya Mima, Hidenao Fukuyama and Christian F. Altmann

      Version of Record online: 14 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12254

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      We tested with MEG whether perceptual grouping affects the processing of sound omission in a tone sequence. Omission in a random tone sequence, compared to a regular tone sequence, elicited larger brain responses in both musicians and nonmusicians. However, the cortical activation pattern differed between them. This indicates that, depending on musical experience, different cortical areas might be implicated in the perceptual grouping of tone sequences.

    2. Functional activation during reading in relation to the sulci of the angular gyrus region (pages 2793–2801)

      Emily Segal and Michael Petrides

      Version of Record online: 17 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12277

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      Neurological studies suggest that the angular gyrus region of the inferior parietal lobule may be critical for reading. However, unambiguous demonstration of angular involvement from lesion and functional neuroimaging studies is lacking, partly because of the absence of detailed morphological descriptions of the angular gyrus region.

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      Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation over auditory cortex degrades frequency discrimination by affecting temporal, but not place, coding (pages 2802–2811)

      Matthew F. Tang and Geoffrey R. Hammond

      Version of Record online: 14 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12280

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      We found that anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (red lines) over human auditory cortex had no effect on rapid perceptual learning but degraded frequency discrimination (A), compared to sham stimulation (blue lines). Two further experiments showed that stimulation degraded frequency discrimination by affecting temporal (B), but not place (C), coding.

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