European Journal of Neuroscience

Cover image for Vol. 39 Issue 6

March 2014

Volume 39, Issue 6

Pages 875–1056

  1. DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    3. NEUROSYSTEMS
    4. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    5. DISORDERS OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM
    1. Site-specific regulation of adult neurogenesis by dietary fatty acid content, vitamin E and flight exercise in European starlings (pages 875–882)

      Zachary J. Hall, Ulf Bauchinger, Alexander R. Gerson, Edwin R. Price, Lillie A. Langlois, Michelle Boyles, Barbara Pierce, Scott R. McWilliams, David F. Sherry and Scott A. MacDougall-Shackleton

      Version of Record online: 27 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12456

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      Exercise and diet are known to have a strong effect on neuroproliferation in mammals ranging from rodents to humans. Here, we found that diet and exercise also upregulate neurogenesis, as measured using the immature neuronal marker doublecortin, in the adult avian brain.

  2. NEUROSYSTEMS

    1. Top of page
    2. DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    3. NEUROSYSTEMS
    4. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    5. DISORDERS OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM
    1. Differential subcellular localization of SK3-containing channels in the hippocampus (pages 883–892)

      Carmen Ballesteros-Merino, Masahiko Watanabe, Ryuichi Shigemoto, Yugo Fukazawa, John P. Adelman and Rafael Luján

      Version of Record online: 9 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12474

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      Highlights:Localization of SK3 channel subunit in the hippocampus

      • We show the molecular expression of the auxiliary SK3 protein in the mouse hippocampus during postnatal development;
      • We provide the precise subcellular localization of the SK3 channel subunit in pyramidal cells and granule cells of the hippocampal formation;
      • The localization of SK3 demonstrate a differential distribution in a cell-type dependent-manner: SK3 are unevenly distributed in pyramidal cells but homogeneously distributed in granule cells.
    2. Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields enhance the survival of newborn neurons in the mouse hippocampus (pages 893–903)

      Maria V. Podda, Lucia Leone, Saviana A. Barbati, Alessia Mastrodonato, Domenica D. Li Puma, Roberto Piacentini and Claudio Grassi

      Version of Record online: 30 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12465

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      The study demonstrates that in vivo exposure to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELFEFs) enhances newborn neuron survival in the mouse hippocampus, resulting in improved spatial learning and memory. ELFEFs rescue differentiating neural stem cells from apoptosis as suggested by TUNEL assay and Western blot analyses of Bax and Bcl-2 expression. Our results support the use of ELFEFs to increase adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Quantitative analysis of neuronal response properties in primary and higher-order auditory cortical fields of awake house mice (Mus musculus) (pages 904–918)

      Bettina Joachimsthaler, Michaela Uhlmann, Frank Miller, Günter Ehret and Simone Kurt

      Version of Record online: 7 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12478

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      Because of its great genetic potential, the mouse (Mus musculus) has become a popular model species for studies on hearing and sound processing along the auditory pathways. Here, we present the first comparative study on representation of neuronal response parameters to tones in primary and higher-order auditory cortical fields of awake mice.

    4. Spatially extended forward suppression in primate auditory cortex (pages 919–933)

      Yi Zhou and Xiaoqin Wang

      Version of Record online: 26 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12460

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      This study investigated the responses of neurons in marmoset auditory cortex to masker and probe stimuli presented from same or different spatial locations. We found that moving the masker away from the center of the spatial receptive field (SRF) of a neuron reduced the response amplitude of a neuron to the masker. However, the location of the masker had little effect on the frequency dependence of forward suppression, which persisted even when the masker was delivered from a “far” location, at which weak or no masker responses were observed.

    5. Spike synchronization in cat primary visual cortex depends on similarity of surround-suppression magnitude (pages 934–945)

      Tomoyuki Naito, Takuji Kasamatsu and Hiromichi Sato

      Version of Record online: 7 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12469

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      We investigated the relationship between spike synchronization and suppressive modulation derived from classical receptive-field surround (surround suppression) in cat primary visual cortex (V1). We found that both layer 4 and layer 2/3 pairs and layer 2/3 and layer 2/3 pairs exhibited spike synchronization that was dependent on the similarity of surround suppression. Our results suggest that in cat V1 there exists a functional network that depends on the similarity in surround suppression.

  3. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    3. NEUROSYSTEMS
    4. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    5. DISORDERS OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM
    1. Effects of maternal care on the development of midbrain dopamine pathways and reward-directed behavior in female offspring (pages 946–956)

      Catherine Jensen Peña, Yael D. Neugut, Cali A. Calarco and Frances A. Champagne

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12479

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      Variation within mesolimbic dopamine (DA) pathways has significant implications for behavioral responses to rewards, and previous studies have indicated long-term programming effects of early life stress on these pathways. In the current study, we examined the impact of natural variations in maternal care in Long Evans rats on the development of DA pathways in female offspring and the consequences for reward-directed behaviors.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Respiratory cycle entrainment of septal neurons mediates the fast coupling of sniffing rate and hippocampal theta rhythm (pages 957–974)

      Marian Tsanov, Ehsan Chah, Richard Reilly and Shane M. O'Mara

      Version of Record online: 11 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12449

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      The novel findings in our manuscript can be summarised as follow: slow-spiking septal neurons are phase-locked to the sniffing cycle, fast-spiking and theta septal neurons correlate their spiking with sniffing rate, hippocampal field and single unit activity couples with sniffing phase during olfactory perception episodes, pharmacological inactivation of medial septum induces parallel decrease of theta and sniffing frequencies and their coherence.

    3. Food rewards modulate the activity of song neurons in Bengalese finches (pages 975–983)

      Yoshimasa Seki, Neal A. Hessler, Kate Xie and Kazuo Okanoya

      Version of Record online: 16 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12457

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      Area X is a basal ganglia nucleus of the avian song system. We found that the spiking activity of singing-related Area X neurons was modulated by food rewards and reward signals in an operant task.

    4. Intact brown adipose tissue thermogenesis is required for restorative sleep responses after sleep loss (pages 984–998)

      Éva Szentirmai and Levente Kapás

      Version of Record online: 26 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12463

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      Sleep loss stimulates brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis. Uncoupling protein-1 (UCP-1) knockout mice show fragmented sleep phenotype and attenuated compensatory sleep increases after sleep loss. Sensory denervation of BAT also diminishes sleep rebound after sleep deprivation. The metabolic activity of BAT is required for generating metabolic environment that is permissive for normal sleep. Impaired BAT function may be a common underlying cause of sleep insufficiency and metabolic disorders.

    5. Epigenetic and pharmacological regulation of 5HT3 receptors controls compulsive ethanol seeking in mice (pages 999–1008)

      Jacqueline M. Barker, Huiping Zhang, J. Joshua Villafane, Tiffany L. Wang, Mary M. Torregrossa and Jane R. Taylor

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12477

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      Factors underlying individual vulnerability to develop alcoholism are largely unknown. In humans, risk for alcoholism is associated with elevated cue reactivity.

    6. Knockdown of tropomyosin-related kinase B receptor expression in the nucleus accumbens shell prevents intermittent social defeat stress-induced cross-sensitization to amphetamine in rats (pages 1009–1017)

      Junshi Wang, Robert W. Bina, Jeffrey C. Wingard, Ernest F. Terwilliger, Ronald P. Hammer Jr and Ella M. Nikulina

      Version of Record online: 19 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12464

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      We demonstrated in rats that BDNF-TrkB signaling in the nucleus acuumbens (NAc) shell is the prerequisite factor of the neuroplasticity in mesolimbic circuitry required for social defeat stress-induced cross-sensitization to amphetamine. We found that viral vector-mediated TrkB knockdown in the NAc shell prevented social defeat stress-induced cross-sensitization to amphetamine. Also stress-induced ΔFosB accumulation in the NAc, the elevation of BDNF and GluA1 subunit of AMPAR in the ventral tegmental area were prevented by intra-NAc shell TrkB knockdown.

  4. DISORDERS OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM

    1. Top of page
    2. DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
    3. NEUROSYSTEMS
    4. BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    5. DISORDERS OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM
    1. Region-specific impairments in striatal synaptic transmission and impaired instrumental learning in a mouse model of Angelman syndrome (pages 1018–1025)

      Volodya Hayrapetyan, Stephen Castro, Tatyana Sukharnikova, Chunxiu Yu, Xinyu Cao, Yong-Hui Jiang and Henry H. Yin

      Version of Record online: 13 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12442

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      Using mutant mice with maternal deficiency of AS E6-AP ubiquitin protein ligase Ube3a (Ube3am−/p+), we assessed the effects of Ube3a deficiency on instrumental conditioning and striatal glutamatergic synaptic transmission. We show for the first time a selective deficit in instrumental conditioning in the Ube3a deficient mouse model, and suggest a specific impairment in glutmatergic transmission in the associative corticostriatal circuit in AS.

    2. Widespread microRNA dysregulation in multiple system atrophy – disease-related alteration in miR-96 (pages 1026–1041)

      Kiren Ubhi, Edward Rockenstein, Christine Kragh, Chandra Inglis, Brian Spencer, Sarah Michael, Michael Mante, Anthony Adame, Douglas Galasko and Eliezer Masliah

      Version of Record online: 5 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12444

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      There is widespread miRNA dysregulation in mouse models of neurodegenerative disorders. Analysis of miRNA profiles may help identify disease-specific and/or disease-common patterns of miRNA dysregulation. miRNA dysregulation in murine models of multiple system atrophy recapitulate the human profile. Dysregulation of miR-96 and its target genes may play a role in multiple system atrophy.

    3. Time course of dopamine neuron loss and glial response in the 6-OHDA striatal mouse model of Parkinson's disease (pages 1042–1056)

      Simon R.W. Stott and Roger A. Barker

      Version of Record online: 26 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12459

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      This report presents a time course study of midbrain dopamine neuron degeneration following 6-OHDA lesion of the adult mouse striatum. We found that while the initial loss of dopamine fibres in the striatum was immediate, morphological changes to the cell body of the dopamine neurons was delayed by several days and a reduction in their number was not observed until 6-9 days after surgery. In addition, the response of microglia and astrocytes in the midbrain was also delayed. This study offers new insight into how these cells die, and provides a timeframe for testing therapeutic agents.

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