A Proposed Framework for Evaluating Alignment Studies

Authors


Susan Davis-Becker, Alpine Testing Solutions, Inc., 51 West Center Street, Orem, UT 84057; Susan.DavisBecker@alpinetesting.com. Chad W. Buckendahl, Alpine Testing Solutions, Inc., 51 West Center Street, Orem, UT 84057; chad.buckendahl@alpinetesting.com.

Abstract

Evaluating the multiple characteristics of alignment has taken a prominent role in educational assessment and accountability systems given its attention in the No Child Left Behind legislation (NCLB). Leading to this rise in popularity, alignment methodologies that examined relationships among curriculum, academic content standards, instruction, and assessments were proposed as strategies to evaluate evidence of the intended uses and interpretations of test scores. In this article, we propose a framework for evaluating alignment studies based on similar concepts that have been recommended for standard setting (Kane). This framework provides guidance to practitioners about how to identify sources of validity evidence for an alignment study and make judgments about the strength of the evidence that may impact the interpretation of the results.

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