Trafficking of NMDA receptors during status epilepticus: Therapeutic implications

Authors

  • Claude G. Wasterlain,

    Corresponding author
    1. UCLA Brain Research Institute, West Los Angeles, California, U.S.A
    2. David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, West Los Angeles, California, U.S.A
    • Department of Neurology, Veterans Administration Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, West Los Angeles, California, U.S.A
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  • David E. Naylor,

    1. Department of Neurology, Veterans Administration Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, West Los Angeles, California, U.S.A
    2. UCLA Brain Research Institute, West Los Angeles, California, U.S.A
    3. Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, West Los Angeles, California, U.S.A
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  • Hantao Liu,

    1. Department of Neurology, Veterans Administration Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, West Los Angeles, California, U.S.A
    2. UCLA Brain Research Institute, West Los Angeles, California, U.S.A
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  • Jerome Niquet,

    1. Department of Neurology, Veterans Administration Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, West Los Angeles, California, U.S.A
    2. UCLA Brain Research Institute, West Los Angeles, California, U.S.A
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  • Roger Baldwin

    1. Department of Neurology, Veterans Administration Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, West Los Angeles, California, U.S.A
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Address correspondence to Claude G. Wasterlain, Department of Neurology (127), West L.A. VA Medical Center, 11301 Wilshire Boulevard, West Los Angeles, CA 90073, U.S.A. E-mail: wasterla@ucla.edu

Summary

We used two models of status epilepticus (SE) to study trafficking of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. SE is associated with increased surface expression of NR1 subunits of NMDA receptors, and with an increase of NMDA synaptic and extrasynaptic currents suggesting an increase in number of functional NMDA receptors on dentate granule cells. The therapeutic implications of these results are discussed.

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