Long-term monitoring of brain tumors: When is it necessary?

Authors

  • Jeffrey Kennedy,

    1. Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, Department of Neurology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Stephan U. Schuele

    Corresponding author
    1. Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, Department of Neurology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A
    • Address correspondence to Stephan U. Schuele, Department of Neurology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Abbott Hall # 1425, 710 North Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60611, U.S.A. E-mail: s-schuele@northwestern.edu

    Search for more papers by this author

Summary

Tumors, particularly low grade glioma and glioneuronal tumors, account for 25–35% of patients who are undergoing epilepsy surgery for intractable seizures. A comprehensive epilepsy evaluation including video–electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring is useful for most of these patients, to determine the optimal extent of resection for the achievement of seizure-free outcome without causing postoperative deficits. Video-EEG monitoring for patients with brain tumor should also be considered in specific situations, such as patients with new postoperative seizures or advanced tumors with unexplained mental status change.

Ancillary