Resecting the epileptogenic tuber: What happens in the long term?

Authors

  • Asim Shahid

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Pediatric Epilepsy, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.A
    • Address correspondence to Asim Shahid, Division of Pediatric Epilepsy, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, 11100 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH 44106, U.S.A. E-mail: asim.shahid@uhhospitals.org

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Summary

Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant, neurocutaneous disorder causing benign noninvasive lesions in multiple organ systems. Cognitive delays and neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism are common. Epilepsy is very common and is associated with single or multiple epileptogenic cortical tubers. More than half of these individuals will become medically refractory over time. For these patients, epilepsy surgery with resection of the epileptogenic tuber or tubers not only can render a select patient population seizure-free, but also improves IQ and cognitive behaviors over time.

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