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Energy Science & Engineering

Cover image for Vol. 1 Issue 2

September 2013

Volume 1, Issue 2

Pages i–ii, 53–108

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Perspectives
    4. Research Articles
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      Issue Information (pages i–ii)

      Version of Record online: 6 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ese3.15

  2. Perspectives

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Perspectives
    4. Research Articles
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Advances on waste valorization: new horizons for a more sustainable society (pages 53–71)

      Rick Arneil D. Arancon, Carol Sze Ki Lin, King Ming Chan, Tsz Him Kwan and Rafael Luque

      Version of Record online: 1 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ese3.9

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      Advanced waste valorization practices provide an infinite number of possibilities to convert residues into chemicals, fuels, and materials.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Photovoltaics: between a bright outlook and uncertainty (pages 72–80)

      Pellumb Berberi, Spiro Thodhorjani, Perparim Hoxha and Valbona Muda

      Version of Record online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ese3.10

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      There is “breakneck” growth in the global photostatics market, with the global installed capacity in 2011 was three times more than 2009. Italy and Germany are leading with 57% of the global market. Costs are dropping rapidly and photovoltaics (PV) power generation is an attractive option for investors. Increasing support of European Union (EU) for renewable energy in general and PV aims to diversify sources of energy and reduce reliance on fossil fuels, on nuclear and on imported energy. The current situation in which Germany and Italy account for almost 2/3 of global PV market growth and, also, the strong reliance on supporting policies is unstable. If PV power generation is to continue growing, the balance of development will have to shift to new markets

  3. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Perspectives
    4. Research Articles
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Practical evaluation of organic polymer thermoelectrics by large-area R2R processing on flexible substrates (pages 81–88)

      Roar R. Søndergaard, Markus Hösel, Nieves Espinosa, Mikkel Jørgensen and Frederik C. Krebs

      Version of Record online: 21 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ese3.8

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      Organic polymer–based thermoelectrics can be printed at high speed on flexible polyester substrates that are easily wound around hot/cold tubes or reservoirs to extract electrical energy from heat.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Comparing oxidative and dilute acid wet explosion pretreatment of Cocksfoot grass at high dry matter concentration for cellulosic ethanol production (pages 89–98)

      Stephen I. Njoku, Hinrich Uellendahl and Birgitte K. Ahring

      Version of Record online: 31 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ese3.11

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      Cocksfoot grass (Dactylis glomerata), was pretreated using wet explosion (WEx) to release maximum hemicellulose sugars in the liquid hydrolysates. This is evident as the highest ethanol concentrations were found under the pretreatment condition at lower severity.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Fuel-mix and energy utilization analysis of Port Harcourt Refining Company, Nigeria (pages 99–108)

      Ismaila Badmus, Richard Olayiwola Fagbenle and Olanrewaju Miracle Oyewola

      Version of Record online: 22 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ese3.12

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      This study analyses fuel-mix of Port Harcourt Refining Company from 2000 to 2011. The average fuel-mix over the 12-year period is 43% refinery fuel gas, 0% liquefied petroleum gas, 44% LPFO, 8% Coke and 5% AGO. Our proposal is that the present AGO and LPFO consumption levels are replaced with equivalent amounts of natural gas.

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