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EuroChoices

Cover image for Vol. 16 Issue 2

August 2017

Volume 16, Issue 2

Pages 3–54

  1. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Original Articles
    4. Point de Vue
    5. Parlons Graphiques
    6. Original Articles
    7. Issue Information
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  2. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Original Articles
    4. Point de Vue
    5. Parlons Graphiques
    6. Original Articles
    7. Issue Information
    1. You have free access to this content
      Brexit, Trade Agreements and CAP Reform (pages 4–9)

      Alan Swinbank

      Version of Record online: 14 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1746-692X.12156

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      Although a number of reforms have significantly changed the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) over the past two decades, a defining characteristic of the policy is its prohibitively high import tariffs on a number of key commodities as tariff cuts have not formed part of CAP reform. These high tariffs, whilst protecting EU producers, complicate the EU's attempts to negotiate Free Trade Area (FTA) agreements around the world, and will likewise be problematic for agri-food trade with a post-Brexit UK, particularly over the politically sensitive border between the EU-27 and the UK on the island of Ireland. An open border could be more easily secured if the UK's tariff barriers on CAP products matched those of the EU-27.

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      Brexit and Tariff Rate Quotas on EU Imports: A Complex Problem (pages 10–17)

      Brian J. Revell

      Version of Record online: 14 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1746-692X.12157

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      Tariff rate quotas (TRQs) are a means by which non-EU suppliers of agri-food products can be given preferential access to EU markets within a regulated framework of quotas at tariff rates below the Most Favoured Nation rates bound in the GATT. TRQs are common in governing trade in the meat and dairy sectors of the EU, although they apply to a wide range of other agricultural commodity and processed agri-food products. Brexit poses a complex set of problems regarding TRQs in terms of how the respective parties should divide up jointly undertaken commitments within the WTO, since TRQs have been negotiated by the Commission on behalf of all EU Member States.

  3. Point de Vue

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Original Articles
    4. Point de Vue
    5. Parlons Graphiques
    6. Original Articles
    7. Issue Information
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      The United Kingdom's Domestic Policy for Agriculture after Brexit (pages 18–23)

      Berkeley Hill

      Version of Record online: 14 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1746-692X.12158

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      The decision in June 2016 by the UK to leave the EU found government departments responsible for domestic agriculture without detailed plans for a post-Brexit national agricultural policy. In February 2017, the Secretary of State indicated five broad ‘priorities’ that largely continue the direction of previous domestic policy. While agricultural trade issues must remain unsettled for some years, consideration can be given now to the shape of UK post-Brexit domestic agricultural policy in each of the devolved administrations (England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland). This article considers from first principles the interventions that could justify public funding. Market failure lies behind the rationale for a range of actions that broadly correspond with current Rural Development Programmes, though not all elements are likely to survive scrutiny.

  4. Parlons Graphiques

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Original Articles
    4. Point de Vue
    5. Parlons Graphiques
    6. Original Articles
    7. Issue Information
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      Brexit and the Dutch Fishing Industry (pages 24–25)

      Mike Turenhout, Katell Hamon, Niels Hintzen and Krijn Poppe

      Version of Record online: 14 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1746-692X.12159

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  5. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Original Articles
    4. Point de Vue
    5. Parlons Graphiques
    6. Original Articles
    7. Issue Information
    1. You have free access to this content
      Brexit Impacts on Irish Agri-food Exports to the UK (pages 26–32)

      Alan Matthews

      Version of Record online: 14 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1746-692X.12160

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      The Irish agri-food sector is particularly exposed to the consequences of the UK's departure from the EU given that the UK is the destination for 37 per cent of its exports. This article discusses the main channels whereby Brexit may impact this trade. They include the impact of possible further depreciation of sterling and the loss of the protected market status that Irish exporters currently enjoy on their sales on the UK market. There is the possibility that tariffs may be imposed on trade flows between the two countries as well as higher trade costs when either exporting to or importing from the UK. There would also be potential disruption of supply chains on the island of Ireland and the particular difficulties of policing the land border between the North and South of Ireland.

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      Geographical Indications and Transatlantic Trade Negotiations: Different US and EU Perspectives (pages 34–40)

      Maria Cecilia Mancini, Filippo Arfini, Mario Veneziani and Erik Thévenod-Mottet

      Version of Record online: 27 JUL 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1746-692X.12131

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      Intellectual Property Rights (IPRs) are an important issue in the negotiations between the United States (US) and the European Union (EU) for a Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) currently underway. However, Geographical Indications (GIs) are one of the most disputed topics because, for decades, the US and the EU have each led one of two seemingly irreconcilable camps on how to address the protection of GIs at the international level. Agreeing on GIs protection in international trade raises important issues related to four dimensions of the GI system, which are likely to become ever more relevant as the TTIP negotiations proceed: i) legal and institutional protection; ii) domestic and international trade; iii) rural/local development and sustainability; and iv) consumers, quality and food safety.

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      Good Governance in the Bioeconomy (pages 41–46)

      Laura Devaney, Maeve Henchion and Áine Regan

      Version of Record online: 13 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1746-692X.12141

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      In response to growing societal and environmental challenges, the concept of the bioeconomy has emerged in Europe, shifting society away from fossil fuels to utilising renewable biological resources to meet food, feed, fuel and material needs. The bioeconomy poses unique questions for governing stakeholders, with a need to simultaneously consider issues of food, fuel and resource security, competition for biomass supply, environmental degradation, climate change, economic growth and rural development. It thus represents one of the most politically complex areas facing agri-food and rural resource sectors internationally. Further development of the bioeconomy and its impact on society will depend on how it is governed.

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      How Advanced Efficiency Techniques Can Support Production Disease Control Decisions on Dairy Farms (pages 47–53)

      Mariska van der Voort, Jef Van Meensel, Johannes Charlier, Guido Van Huylenbroeck and Ludwig Lauwers

      Version of Record online: 15 MAY 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1746-692X.12152

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      Production diseases in dairy cows can have significant effects on farm business performance. Decisions about controlling production diseases are mainly based on veterinary advice. However, from an economic perspective, mere diagnosis of disease does not provide enough information for intervention decisions. Well-founded decisions are based on knowledge of the economic effects of production diseases and their control measures. One challenge for dairy farmers and advisors is to access farm-specific tools that can determine the effect of a disease on farm business performance. Efficiency analysis facilitates a more integrated economic-epidemiological view by considering the aggregate transformation of inputs into outputs; it also enables advanced benchmarking within a set of farms. With efficiency analysis, the effect of diseases on economic performance can be studied and farm-specific economic-epidemiological win–win scenarios can be identified.

  6. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Original Articles
    4. Point de Vue
    5. Parlons Graphiques
    6. Original Articles
    7. Issue Information
    1. You have free access to this content
      Issue Information - Society Diary (page 54)

      Version of Record online: 14 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1746-692X.12133

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