Extensive umbilical herniation of the large colon in a foal

Authors

  • C. J. Bodaan,

    1. Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Institute of Veterinary Animal and Biomedical Sciences, College of Sciences, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand
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  • L. Panizzi,

    Corresponding author
    1. Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Institute of Veterinary Animal and Biomedical Sciences, College of Sciences, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand
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  • A. J. Stewart,

    1. Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama, USA
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  • E. Cypher,

    1. Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Institute of Veterinary Animal and Biomedical Sciences, College of Sciences, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand
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  • L. Whitfield,

    1. Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Institute of Veterinary Animal and Biomedical Sciences, College of Sciences, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand
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  • C. B. Riley

    1. Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Institute of Veterinary Animal and Biomedical Sciences, College of Sciences, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand
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Summary

A 5-month-old Warmblood cross colt was presented with focal swelling of the ventral abdomen extending from the umbilicus to the scrotum in the absence of colic signs. Palpation and ultrasound examination revealed the presence of incarcerated large intestine within the subcutaneous space adjacent to the caudal ventral abdomen and prepuce. Surgery was performed and revealed that the umbilical hernia sac had ruptured, and confirmed that the left dorsal and ventral colon were present in the subcutaneous space. The mild degree of vascular compromise of the large colon did not necessitate resection and so it was replaced within the abdomen. The abdominal wall defect was closed and the subcutaneous dead space was reduced by using a walking suture pattern. Herniation of the large colon through the umbilicus with dissection through the subcutaneous tissues of the ventral abdominal wall and prepuce has not been previously reported in foals. Ultrasonography permits differentiation of herniated small intestine from large intestine.

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