PUPARIATION SITE PREFERENCE WITHIN AND BETWEEN DROSOPHILA SIBLING SPECIES

Authors

  • Deniz F. Erezyilmaz,

    1. Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology and Center for Developmental Genetics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York
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  • David L. Stern

    1. Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey
    Current affiliation:
    1. Janelia Farm and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, Virginia
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Abstract

Holometabolous insects pass through a sedentary pupal stage and often choose a location for pupation that is different from the site of larval feeding. We have characterized a difference in pupariation site choice within and between sibling species of Drosophila. We found that, in nature, Drosophila sechellia pupariate within their host fruit, Morinda citrifolia, and that they perform this behavior in laboratory assays. In contrast, in the laboratory, geographically diverse strains of Drosophila simulans vary in their pupariation site preference; D. simulans lines from the ancestral range in southeast Africa pupariate on fruit, or a fruit substitute, whereas populations from Europe or the New World select sites off of fruit. We explored the genetic basis for the evolved preference in puariation site preference by performing quantitative trait locus mapping within and between species. We found that the interspecific difference is controlled largely by loci on chromosomes X and II. In contrast, variation between two strains of D. simulans appears to be highly polygenic, with the majority of phenotypic effects due to loci on chromosome III. These data address the genetic basis of how new traits arise as species diverge and populations disperse.

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