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The FEBS Journal

Cover image for Vol. 279 Issue 22

November 2012

Volume 279, Issue 22

Pages 4111–4245

  1. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Original Articles
    3. Author index
    1. You have free access to this content
      Influence of peptide dipoles and hydrogen bonds on reactive cysteine pKa values in fission yeast DJ-1 (pages 4111–4120)

      Peter Madzelan, Tetyana Labunska and Mark A. Wilson

      Version of Record online: 11 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12004

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      The structural determinants of cysteine pKa depression are incompletely understood. We show that a hydrogen bond between a threonine side chain and a peptide group lowers the pKa value of a proximal reactive cysteine in Schizosaccharomyces pombe DJ-1. This result provides experimental support for the role of peptide dipoles in modulating cysteine pKa values.

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      Deficiency in the nuclear-related factor erythroid 2 transcription factor (Nrf1) leads to genetic instability (pages 4121–4130)

      Diane H. Oh, Diamanda Rigas, Ara Cho and Jefferson Y. Chan

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12005

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      Transcription factor Nrf1 regulates cellular stress response. In this study, we showed that loss of Nrf1 function leads to increased micronuclei, formation of abnormal nuclei, and aneuploidy. These defects were associated with decreased expression of various genes encoding kinetochore and mitotic checkpoint proteins suggesting that Nrf1 may serve a function in maintaining genomic integrity.

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      Phosphorylation on threonine 11 of β-dystrobrevin alters its interaction with kinesin heavy chain (pages 4131–4144)

      Federica Fratini, Gianfranco Macchia, Paola Torreri, Andrea Matteucci, Anna Maria Salzano, Marco Crescenzi, Pompeo Macioce, Tamara C. Petrucci and Marina Ceccarini

      Version of Record online: 11 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12006

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      β-dystrobrevin, a component of the dystrophin complex, can be phosphorylated by PKA and PKC. By mass spectrometry analysis, we have identified β-dystrobrevin residues phosphorylated in vitro by both the kinases and, using pull-down assays and surface plasmon resonance measurements, demonstrated that threonine 11 is a key residue for β-dystrobrevin–kinesin interaction.

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      Why in vivo may not equal in vitro – new effectors revealed by measurement of enzymatic activities under the same in vivo-like assay conditions (pages 4145–4159)

      Rodolfo García-Contreras, Paul Vos, Hans V. Westerhoff and Fred C. Boogerd

      Version of Record online: 12 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12007

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      Does the understanding of the dynamics of biochemical networks in vivo, in terms of the properties of their components determined in vitro, require the latter to be determined under the same conditions? An in vivo-like assay medium for enzyme activity determination was designed based on the concentrations of the major ionic constituents of the E. coli cytosol.

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      A surprising observation that oxygen can affect the product enantiopurity of an enzyme-catalysed reaction (pages 4160–4171)

      Anna Fryszkowska, Helen S. Toogood, David Mansell, Gill Stephens, John M. Gardiner and Nigel S. Scrutton

      Version of Record online: 12 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12008

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      Pentaerythritol tetranitrate reductase catalyses the NAD(P)H-dependent reduction of (E)-2-phenyl-1-nitroprop-2-ene. Under aerobic conditions, it undergoes FMNred reoxidation by oxygen, generating hydrogen peroxide and superoxide (ROS). The presence of oxygen and ROS influenced 2-phenyl-1-nitropropane product enantiopurity, by increasing the proportion of (R)- and (S)-alkane generated, respectively. This may be due to the presence of oxidatively modified cysteine and/or methionine residues.

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      20-Residue and 11-residue peptaibols from the fungus Trichoderma longibrachiatum are synergistic in forming Na+/K+-permeable channels and adverse action towards mammalian cells (pages 4172–4190)

      Raimo Mikkola, Maria A. Andersson, László Kredics, Pavel A. Grigoriev, Nina Sundell and Mirja S. Salkinoja-Salonen

      Version of Record online: 16 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12010

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      The T. longibrachiatum strains produced 11- and 20-residue peptaibols (green and blue) forming Na+/K+ permeable ion-channels in lipid bilayer with synergistic properties. The combined 11- and 20-residue peptaibols generated channels that remained in an open state for a longer time than those formed by either peptaibol alone. As a result the two peptaibols were synergistically toxic toward mammalian cells.

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      Does human leukocyte elastase degrade intact skin elastin? (pages 4191–4200)

      Christian E. H. Schmelzer, Michael C. Jung, Johannes Wohlrab, Reinhard H. H. Neubert and Andrea Heinz

      Version of Record online: 15 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12012

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      Elastin is a vital and extremely durable protein of the extracellular matrix of vertebrates and provides elasticity to many tissues. Here, we report that human leukocyte elastase, an enzyme often proposed to be important in elastin catabolism at inflammatory sites did not degrade intact skin elastin, but hydrolyzed elastin derived from the skin of old people.

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      Downregulation of miR-101 in gastric cancer correlates with cyclooxygenase-2 overexpression and tumor growth (pages 4201–4212)

      Xiao-Pu He, Yun Shao, Xiao-Lin Li, Wei Xu, Guo-Sheng Chen, Huan-Huan Sun, Hai-Chen Xu, Xian Xu, Dan Tang, Xi-Feng Zheng, Yi-Ping Xue, Guo-Chang Huang and Wei-Hao Sun

      Version of Record online: 22 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12013

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      COX-2 plays important role in the carcinogenesis and progression of gastric cancer. We found an inverse correlation between miR-101 and COX-2 expression in gastric cancer specimens and cell lines. Overexpression of miR-101 inhibited cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo, suggesting that miR-101 may function as a tumor suppressor in gastric cancer, with COX-2 as a direct target.

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      Size homeostasis can be intrinsic to growing cell populations and explained without size sensing or signalling (pages 4213–4230)

      Thomas W. Spiesser, Christiane Müller, Gabriele Schreiber, Marcus Krantz and Edda Klipp

      Version of Record online: 22 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12014

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      Cells coordinate growth and division to maintain a regular size. The cell division cycle orchestrates cellular growth and division, but the mechanisms that couple its progression with the physiological state of the cell remain unknown. Here, we model complete pedigrees of growing and dividing cells under a variety of growth conditions to elucidate this coupling in budding yeast.

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      Accumulation of squalene is associated with the clustering of lipid droplets (pages 4231–4244)

      Minh T. Ta, Tamar S. Kapterian, Weihua Fei, Ximing Du, Andrew J. Brown, Ian W. Dawes and Hongyuan Yang

      Version of Record online: 22 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12015

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      The biogenesis, growth and cellular distribution of lipid droplets are not well understood. Through genome-wide screening in the budding yeast, we found extensive clustering of lipid droplets (arbitrarily defined as aggregation of six or more droplets) in cells that accumulate squalene due to reduced expression of ERG1. Additional experiments establish a link between squalene and the clustering of lipid droplets.

  2. Author index

    1. Top of page
    2. Original Articles
    3. Author index
    1. You have free access to this content
      Author index (page 4245)

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2012.08342.x

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