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The FEBS Journal

Cover image for Vol. 279 Issue 24

December 2012

Volume 279, Issue 24

Pages 4423–4629

  1. Review Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Review Article
    3. Original Articles
    4. Author index
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      Protein arginine methylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (pages 4423–4443)

      Jason K. K. Low and Marc R. Wilkins

      Version of Record online: 22 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12039

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      There has been significant interest in the study of protein arginine methylation in the last 5 years. The widespread nature of this modification and its importance in eukaryotic systems is now apparent. This review covers recent progress in understanding arginine methylation and its function, with a focus on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and how this compares to mammalian systems

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  2. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Review Article
    3. Original Articles
    4. Author index
    1. You have free access to this content
      Electron transport during aceticlastic methanogenesis by Methanosarcina acetivorans involves a sodium-translocating Rnf complex (pages 4444–4452)

      Katharina Schlegel, Cornelia Welte, Uwe Deppenmeier and Volker Müller

      Version of Record online: 8 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12031

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      Methanogenesis from low-energy substrate acetate as carried out by Methanosarcina acetivorans involves an anaerobic electron transport chain from ferredoxin to heterodisulfide. Inside-out membrane vesicles of M. acetivorans catalyzed primary and electrogenic Na+ transport coupled to this electron transport chain. In a ∆rnf mutant the ferredoxin:heterodisulfide oxidoreductase-coupled Na+ transport was abolished, indicating that the Rnf complex is Na+-motive

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      A diverse set of family 48 bacterial glycoside hydrolase cellulases created by structure-guided recombination (pages 4453–4465)

      Matthew A. Smith, Andrea Rentmeister, Christopher D. Snow, Timothy Wu, Mary F. Farrow, Florence Mingardon and Frances H. Arnold

      Version of Record online: 9 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12032

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      We recombine the catalytic domains of three family 48 bacterial cellulases (Cel48, EC 3.2.1.176) to create a diverse collection of chimeric cellulases having an average of 106 mutations from the closest native enzyme. Thermostable and catalytically active chimeric family 48 cellulases can be accurately predicted using a simple sequence-function model trained on data from a small sample of chimeras

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      Crystal structure of greglin, a novel non-classical Kazal inhibitor, in complex with subtilisin (pages 4466–4478)

      Chrystelle Derache, Christophe Epinette, Alain Roussel, Guillaume Gabant, Martine Cadene, Brice Korkmaz, Francis Gauthier and Christine Kellenberger

      Version of Record online: 12 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12033

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      The crystal structure of the complex between subtilisin and greglin, a serine protease from the locust Schistocerca gregaria, shows that greglin is a non-classical Kazal inhibitor with an additional fourth disulphide bond and an unusual C-terminal region, which may be responsible for the inhibitory specificity. Greglin bears unusual post-translational modifications in the N-terminal region characterised by mass spectrometry

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      Expression of LY6D is induced at the surface of MCF10A cells by X-ray irradiation (pages 4479–4491)

      Maiko Kurosawa, Anand D. Jeyasekharan, Eva-Maria Surmann, Noboru Hashimoto, Vignesh Venkatraman, Gene Kurosawa, Koichi Furukawa, Ashok R. Venkitaraman and Yoshikazu Kurosawa

      Version of Record online: 22 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12034

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      In order to identify membrane proteins whose expression is induced by X-ray irradiation, we developed an antibody (Ab)-directed strategy using a phage Ab library. Using this approach, we found that expression of LY6D is induced in MCF10A cells by X-ray irradiation. This method is a new proteomic strategy for analysis of membrane proteins, and is applicable to various biological phenomena

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      Evidence for a dual functional role of a conserved histidine in RNA·DNA heteroduplex cleavage by human RNase H1 (pages 4492–4500)

      Nageswara R. Alla and Allen W. Nicholson

      Version of Record online: 9 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12035

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      The conserved enzyme RNase H1 is the catalytic agent in gene silencing by oligodeoxynucleotide antisense drugs. An optimized in ;vitro assay involving purified recombinant human RNase H1 can recapitulate the in vivo pathway of antisense oligonucleotide-directed RNA cleavage, and is used to show that the highly conserved histidine 264 is important for both the hydrolytic and product release steps

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      How is the distal pocket of a heme protein optimized for binding of tryptophan? (pages 4501–4509)

      Nishma Chauhan, Jaswir Basran, Sara A. Rafice, Igor Efimov, Elizabeth S. Millett, Christopher G. Mowat, Peter C. E. Moody, Sandeep Handa and Emma L. Raven

      Version of Record online: 22 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12036

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      How is the distal pocket of a heme protein optimised for binding of tryptophan? Binding of tryptophan is a particular speciality of the distal active sites of the tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase catalytic enzymes. Using mutagenesis, we probe the functional role various active site residues in both human enzymes and make comparisons with other related heme enzymes

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      miR-16 inhibits the proliferation and angiogenesis-regulating potential of mesenchymal stem cells in severe pre-eclampsia (pages 4510–4524)

      Yaping Wang, Hongye Fan, Guangfeng Zhao, Dan Liu, Leilei Du, Zhiqun Wang, Yali Hu and Yayi Hou

      Version of Record online: 22 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12037

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      The differential expression of miRNAs in decidua-derived mesenchymal stem cells from normal and pre-eclampsia groups was analysed using microarrays and bioinformatics. Over-expressed miR-16 inhibited the proliferation and migration of dMSCs and induced cell cycle arrest by targeting CCNE1. miR-16-over-expressed dMSCs reduced the ability of HUVEC to form blood vessels and the migration of the trophoblast cells

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      Structural basis of peptide recognition by the angiotensin-1 converting enzyme homologue AnCE from Drosophila melanogaster (pages 4525–4534)

      Mohd Akif, Geoffrey Masuyer, Richard J. Bingham, Edward D. Sturrock, R. Elwyn Isaac and K. Ravi Acharya

      Version of Record online: 22 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12038

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      Human somatic angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) is the principal component of the renin angiotensin-aldosterone system that regulates blood pressure, and is therefore an important therapeutic target. The structures of AnCE (Drosophila melanogaster homologue of ACE) co-crystallised with mammalian peptide substrates are reported here. This study improves our understanding of the mechanism by which peptides inhibit this family of enzymes

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      Involvement of transcription factor Ets-1 in the expression of the α3 integrin subunit gene (pages 4535–4546)

      Go Kamoshida, Ayaka Matsuda, Kouji Katabami, Takumi Kato, Hiromi Mizuno, Wakana Sekine, Teruaki Oku, Saotomo Itoh, Makoto Tsuiji, Yoshiyuki Hattori, Yoshie Maitani and Tsutomu Tsuji

      Version of Record online: 22 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12040

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      We analyzed gene expression of ɑ3β1 integrin, a member of the integrin family of adhesion molecules, by electrophoretic mobility shift assay, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, luciferase assay, and dominant-negative mutation. The results suggest that Ets-1 is involved in transcriptional activation of the ɑ3 integrin gene through its binding to the Ets-consensus sequence at −133 bp of mouse ɑ3 integrin gene

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      Structural basis for dual inhibitory role of tamarind Kunitz inhibitor (TKI) against factor Xa and trypsin (pages 4547–4564)

      Dipak N. Patil, Anshul Chaudhary, Ashwani K. Sharma, Shailly Tomar and Pravindra Kumar

      Version of Record online: 22 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12042

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      The dual inhibitory activity of Kunitz type dual inhibitor (TKI) of factor Xa (FXa) and trypsin has been investigated biochemically and structurally. The crystal structure of free TKI and its complex structure with trypsin were determined. Molecular docking was performed to examine the mode of interaction of TKI with FXa. Structural and modeling studies show that a versatile reactive site loop is responsible for dual inhibition

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      Active site analysis of yeast flavohemoglobin based on its structure with a small ligand or econazole (pages 4565–4575)

      Emna El Hammi, Eberhard Warkentin, Ulrike Demmer, Nejib M. Marzouki, Ulrich Ermler and Laura Baciou

      Version of Record online: 21 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12043

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      Flavohemoglobins protect microorganisms against NO-mediated toxicity. The X-ray structures of Saccharomyces cerevisae flavohemoglobins in complex with an unknown small ligand and econazole reveal, beside a high architectural accordance between prokaryotic and eukaryotic family members, a catalytically productive active site geometry that reliably suggests the NO and O2 binding site

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      The S100A6 calcium-binding protein regulates endothelial cell-cycle progression and senescence (pages 4576–4588)

      Leyuan Bao, Adam F. Odell, Sam L. Stephen, Stephen B. Wheatcroft, John H. Walker and Sreenivasan Ponnambalam

      Version of Record online: 22 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12044

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      The S100 family of calcium-binding proteins regulates many aspects of cell function in higher eukaryotes. Biochemical, cellular and genetic studies on S100A6 in vascular endothelial cells revealed a functional role in cell cycle progression and senescence. S100A6 regulates expression of specific genes that control endothelial cell cycle progression. Depletion of S100A6 increased endothelial cell senescence thus confirming its important regulatory role

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      Insulin solubility transitions by pH-dependent interactions with proinsulin C-peptide (pages 4589–4597)

      Michael Landreh, Gunvor Alvelius, Hanna Willander, Jan-Bernd Stukenborg, Olle Söder, Jan Johansson and Hans Jörnvall

      Version of Record online: 21 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12045

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      Proinsulin C-peptide is stored with insulin in the β-cell secretory granules under mildly acidic conditions. We report that C-peptide co-precipitates with insulin at pH 5 and removes soluble insulin oligomers. The interaction of the negatively charged C-peptide with the positively charged insulin is dependent on glutamate residues relatively conserved in the otherwise little conserved C-peptide sequence

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      Androgen receptor association with mitotic chromatin – analysis with introduced deletions and disease-inflicting mutations (pages 4598–4614)

      Sanjay Kumar and Rakesh K. Tyagi

      Version of Record online: 23 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12046

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      Utilizing GFP/RFP-tagged AR, its domain deletion and NLS mutants, we have shown that androgen receptor (AR) domains and bipartite NLS govern intracellular localization and organization of the receptor. Full-length AR is mandatory for mitotic chromatin association. AR bipartite NLS region also functions as ‘mitotic chromatin binding-determining region’ and has a novel role in regulation of AR association with mitotic chromatin

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      SET overexpression decreases cell detoxification efficiency: ALDH2 and GSTP1 are downregulated, DDR is impaired and DNA damage accumulates (pages 4615–4628)

      Luciana O. Almeida, Renata N. Goto, Cezar R. Pestana, Sérgio A. Uyemura, Silvio Gutkind, Carlos Curti and Andréia M. Leopoldino

      Version of Record online: 23 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12047

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      Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) and glutathione S-transferase pi 1 (GSTP1) are important enzymes for cellular detoxification and low efficiency favors oral cancer. SET protein, a histone acetylation modulator accumulated in HNSCC, decreased ALDH2 and GSTP1 mRNA levels and protein activities, increased DNA damage in association with TP53 up-regulation and BRCA2 recruitment, promoting DDR impairment

  3. Author index

    1. Top of page
    2. Review Article
    3. Original Articles
    4. Author index
    1. You have free access to this content
      Author index (page 4629)

      Version of Record online: 4 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2012.08344.x

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